#1
I want to do a solo project using just my guitar and a drum machine and I have some ideas for the guitar but i'm not sure if they'd work.

I strung up my guitar's low E string slot with a bass guitar D string to make up for a lack of a bass(ist) and plan on playing it through my Marshall DSL 401 but I don't know if A) it would give me enough low end if I roll up the bass enough or B) if doing so would damage my speaker. I'd be playing small venues and cafes so I don't think i'd need too much bass and it could fit the lo-fi aesthetic that seems cool with folks. What do you guys think?
Last edited by OnlyTwin at Nov 20, 2014,
#2
Honestly just get an octave pedal if you want to play the basslines, aguitar is shorter scaled then a bass, and it has a very different timbre. If you're using drum machine why not use a synth to play basslines in time with the drums?

Often Ill set up my chain as this :

Guitar > OC3 > Dry signal > One amp
> Effected signal > another amp




I dont know if using bass strings on a guitar will ruin a speaker, but I do know that you cant play bass through guitar speakers.
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#3
I have an out of order octave pedal that I COULD try to fix up but it would mean everything I play doubled lower so i've passed on that idea. but honestly, I like the way the bass string sounds... slinky and dirty. I just like the idea of confining both the guitar and bass parts to one instrument in a classical guitar sorta way. Personally, I also don't like the idea of a bass part as a backing track...

Also, what about adding a subwoofer/bass speaker and playing this through that?
#4
That larger string may be a little rough on the necks tension and you have to really cut the nut channel pretty heavily which means theres no going back until you put on a new nut. The other thing may be that you are limiting yourself heavily to the chord inversions you want to play on guitar if you want to use that one string for all the bass lines not to mention what your action will have to like to keep that bigger string from buzzing. Nice idea though.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Nov 21, 2014,
#5
Well, I didn't want to be playing to a recorded bass track but I food that there are drum machines with bass and thought, "I am okay with this..." The original idea seemed pretty dumb afterwards. I think this thread is over with but thanks for the advice guys.
#7
Quote by OnlyTwin

I strung up my guitar's low E string slot with a bass guitar D string to make up for a lack of a bass(ist) and plan on playing it through my Marshall DSL 401 but I don't know if A) it would give me enough low end if I roll up the bass enough or B) if doing so would damage my speaker. I'd be playing small venues and cafes so I don't think i'd need too much bass and it could fit the lo-fi aesthetic that seems cool with folks. What do you guys think?


Borrow an older Variax.

You can actually set up alternate tunings on each individual string of up to an octave down and a bit less than that up. I've routinely set up one of the models on my Variax Acoustic 700 with standard tuning on the top four strings. The bottom two strings are tuned standard on the guitar, but the pitch replacement technology has them tuned down an octave (into bass territory). I play bass with my thumb, chords and melody with fingers. There's some editing software that will allow you to set the volume of each individual string, so you can dial the bass back if you think it's too loud.

Worth noting, by the way, that there are keyboards that include 16-track sequencers, extremely high-quality drum kits (and patterns) and a whole lot of instrumentation. You can actually do anything up to and including a hi-fi aesthetic to back you.