#1
Firstly, apologies if this is a technique question and is in the wrong place but I wasn't sure.

Essentially I'm wondering if there is a pedal, or way to set up my amp (Peavey, nothing extra on it than the usual) so that when I switch from playing a rhythm to a lead solo the chord I was playing keeps ringing? I'm the only guitarist and when I try and move from say the chord at the end of the chorus to say the lead, be it a short riff or solo the silence is very noticeable unless it comes straight in, even then the change can be distinct.

Playing an epiphone Sheraton 2 if that makes any difference.
#2
I'm not aware of any such pedal, aside from having a delay on that has a trail.

I play as the only guitarist lots. I just write my solo's / transitions such that there are no real dead spaces. I'm usually striking the last chord, then sliding into my solo right away. I'm thinking you're just having a timing issue. Let the chord rig out, and start the solo right on the first beat of the backing groove.

I mean, from what you're describing, you would likely have the same issue even if you had a 2nd guitarist. You're still stopping, and leaving a gap between your rhythm and lead.
Guitars:
PRS Custom 24
Gibson Les Paul 60's Tribute
85' MIJ Strat
97' Snakepit Les Paul
LP Traditional 1960 Zebra
MIJ Tele
MIA Strat

Amps:
Silver Jubilee 2525
Peavey Ultra 112
Jet City JCA50H
66' Bassman
Pink Paisley Princeton RV
74' Vibro Champ
#3
Cool, you're most probably right. Were doing covers so it maybe I need throw in some extra bits to move from one bit to the next. Cheers, sometimes you need to hear it from others, d'ya know what I mean.
#4
If the last chord contains open strings, let the open strings ring and start playing the solo. Or as said above, just slide to the note that begins the solo. You could of course use loops/backing tracks. I don't recommend that though. If you are using them, you need to play with a click all the time. Also, if you make a mistake (for example start playing the chorus too early or repeat it too many times), you are pretty much screwed. This isn't a problem without backing tracks because you can just use your ears and listen to other musicians. But backing tracks can't hear you. They play what they are programmed to play so you can't skip a section. And that kind of mistakes do happen even to professional bands (I heard that that happened to U2 - IIRC they accidentally skipped a section and that made them out of synch with the backing track and they had to stop playing the song). I would only recommend using backing tracks if your songs aren't doable any other way.

Yeah, as said above, it may have to do with your timing. You need to switch really fast from rhythm to lead. Practice that.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Nov 22, 2014,
#5
For sure man. Listen to the way that the bands your covering play the tunes live. Some bands will lay down multiple rhythm parts that are playing throughout, that way there are no gaps on the recording. Sometimes they're not very loud or noticeable, but its enough to distract your ear.

Edit: ^ Yea my last band used backing tracks for some songs. It was mostly for syth tho. We also ran a light show, so we always played to a click, and had everything synced up anyways. It can be tricky tho.
Guitars:
PRS Custom 24
Gibson Les Paul 60's Tribute
85' MIJ Strat
97' Snakepit Les Paul
LP Traditional 1960 Zebra
MIJ Tele
MIA Strat

Amps:
Silver Jubilee 2525
Peavey Ultra 112
Jet City JCA50H
66' Bassman
Pink Paisley Princeton RV
74' Vibro Champ
Last edited by red.guitar at Nov 22, 2014,
#6
You just gotta get the hang of jumping to the lead break faster so that there is no gap. It takes a lot of practice and I'd say was the thing I found the hardest to learn how to do. That's what makes the power trio hard to do well. You gotta be able to jump from one part to the other seamlessly. You're on your own, nobody to cover the transition for you, it's all down to you.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#7
one piece of advice is to see if you can start the lead with one of the notes in the chord. makes the transition a little smoother. as cathbard said practice.
#9
Oh dear. A gadget to compensate for poor technique? Seriously? Everybody that plays in a 3 piece band has to overcome this difficulty. It simply means he has to practice more - or hire another guitarist.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#10
Quote by Cathbard
Oh dear. A gadget to compensate for poor technique? Seriously? Everybody that plays in a 3 piece band has to overcome this difficulty. It simply means he has to practice more - or hire another guitarist.


Couldn't of said it better. Get you technique down, and worry about toy's later.
Guitars:
PRS Custom 24
Gibson Les Paul 60's Tribute
85' MIJ Strat
97' Snakepit Les Paul
LP Traditional 1960 Zebra
MIJ Tele
MIA Strat

Amps:
Silver Jubilee 2525
Peavey Ultra 112
Jet City JCA50H
66' Bassman
Pink Paisley Princeton RV
74' Vibro Champ
#12
Quote by monwobobbo
one piece of advice is to see if you can start the lead with one of the notes in the chord. makes the transition a little smoother. as cathbard said practice.


This works really well.
Or at the least, try to play the first note or two of the lead on the fretboard close to where you are playing that last chord.
And of course, practice, practice, practice.
#13
Cheers for the input folks, I'm off to practice some more!!!
#14
No one thinks what he really needs is a new amp?

Jackson RR3 Rhoads and DK2M Dinky
Peavey 6505+ w/ Avatar 212 cab
Ibanez TS9, ISP Decimator, MXR 10 Band EQ
-Digitech RP1000
#15
Well... It couldn't hurt, right?
Guitars:
PRS Custom 24
Gibson Les Paul 60's Tribute
85' MIJ Strat
97' Snakepit Les Paul
LP Traditional 1960 Zebra
MIJ Tele
MIA Strat

Amps:
Silver Jubilee 2525
Peavey Ultra 112
Jet City JCA50H
66' Bassman
Pink Paisley Princeton RV
74' Vibro Champ