#2
It's fun to do scales in groups of notes, and to start the next group a note above or below where the last group started.
For example, ascending the Gmajor scale in groups of 4. You could play G A B C, A B C D, B C D E, C D E F, G.
#3
Going to need a bit more information than that, I could point you to literally thousands.
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#4
I really like runs in a Harmonic Minor. Compared to a regular minor, just sharpen the 7th so it's a major 7, and you have a full two fret gap between the 6 and 7. I like to play those scales and do lots of hovering around the back to back semitone intervals of the 2-3 and the 7-1. Real evil sounding.
Last edited by the_bi99man at Nov 22, 2014,
#5
Quote by the_bi99man
I really like runs in a Melodic Minor. Compared to a regular minor, just sharpen the 7th so it's a major 7, and you have a full two fret gap between the 6 and 7. I like to play those scales and do lots of hovering around the back to back semitone intervals of the 2-3 and the 7-1. Real evil sounding.


The scale you're talking about there is the harmonic minor. Melodic minor is, I think, a natural 6 and 7 on the way up, but I also don't think many guitarists observe the differences between the ascending and descending versions of the scale anyway.
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#6
I was trying scale runs on pentatonic scale fpr the first time, man it sure has some big stretches, how common are these?

and also I was tryig 4 note a string, its really hard for me as my fingers are small. Any advice for that?

and yes I like the harmonic minor. And yes I want thousands of scale runs ^^^^^ lol
#7
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
The scale you're talking about there is the harmonic minor. Melodic minor is, I think, a natural 6 and 7 on the way up, but I also don't think many guitarists observe the differences between the ascending and descending versions of the scale anyway.


Haha. You beat me to it as I was editing my post. Almost immediately after I wrote that I was like, "wait a minute...." And yeah, the melodic minor is, at least the way I've understood it, a natural 6 and 7 on the way up, then flat 6 and 7, so regular minor scale, when descending. It also sounds really cool. I'm a big fan in general of scales that use a minor third with a major seventh. Gives the whole 7-1-2-3 range a diminished feel, with the two separated one-semitone intervals.
#8
Straight scale runs are actually pretty uncommon, mainly because they sound boring...you'll rarely get more than 3 or 4 sequential notes. Longer runs tend to be more arpeggio based, larger intervals but a more harmonically coherent sound.

However what I think are called "braid" runs are quite common, certainly far more common than straight scale sequences. I think they're referred to as braids brcause the patterns "loop back" on themselves as they ascend/descend, stuff like this.

e|--15-12-----12--------------------------------------------------------------------
B|--------15----15-12--15-12-----12-------------------------------------------------
G|---------------------------14-----14-12----14-12-----12---------------------------
D|-------------------------------------------------14-----14-12---14-12----12-------
A|----------------------------------------------------------------------14----14-12-
E|----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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#9
Hey is that called a loop back? I have been doing those recently they are quite cool. Please explain those diminished scale and stuff.
#10
Quote by inchindar
Hey is that called a loop back? I have been doing those recently they are quite cool. Please explain those diminished scale and stuff.



ahh the diminished scale .. a real treasure..just the basic info on it for now..its an 8 tone scale...C D Eb F Gb Ab A B..its a symmetrical scale. common name is Whoe/Half diminished..it repeats on every minor 3rd note..so the arpeggio is C Eb Gb A ..

Move it up to Db and then D..and you have all the diminished scales..

the C dim scale works well on dominate chords a half step lower..in this case B7..now you can start the scale on B.(this is commonly called a Half step/Whole step diminished) BUT it is still a C diminished scale .. no need in making it super complicated - you can name the scale any of the notes in the arpeggio..C Eb Gb A..but remember that the main scale name is C..same with Db and D dim

the scale is also know for producing 7b9 chords..in C dim they would be: B7b9 D7b9 F7b9 Ab7b9--all with no root tone!

now..find other chords that are within the scale (hint: D7 is one)..have fun

play well

wolf