#1
My teenage cousin is planning to learn guitar, and I am still thinking to buy her a Fretlight guitar (http://www.amazon.com/Fretlight-Traditional-Electric-Learning-FG-521SB/dp/B00IZJQWXW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1415835810&sr=8-1&keywords=fretlight ) but I've heard that Rocksmith method (http://www.amazon.com/Rocksmith-2014-PC-Mac-Cable-Included/dp/B00D6PTMHI/ref=sr_1_1_twi_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1415835904&sr=8-1&keywords=rocksmith ) is better than the former. Has anybody some experiences with any of them?
#2
Think about Fretlight this way: if you spent an hour playing guitar, and stared at the fretboard almost the entire time, how would your neck feel afterward? And if you did that every day for a year how many thousands of dollars would you have to spend on physical therapy to fix your neck? Because that’s Fretlight in a nutshell.

Rocksmith is great—I spend at least an hour in Rocksmith most days. And if you install the custom DLC patch the music selection is pretty good. But Rocksmith has serious drawbacks for a beginner. It doesn’t teach anything about theory. There’s a minigame about scales, but that’s it. And Rocksmith teaches very little about technique (just crappy videos) and provides no feedback about technique. It also doesn’t teach reading music—not even tabs. So also get her the Hal Leonard bass method book/CD set and make sure she understands that if she doesn’t learn that she’ll be trapped in whatever is available for Rocksmith.
Last edited by jpnyc at Nov 23, 2014,
#3
Quote by SamuelJohns
My teenage cousin is planning to learn guitar, and I am still thinking to buy her a Fretlight guitar but I've heard that Rocksmith method is better than the former. Has anybody some experiences with any of them?


I've looked at both briefly, and I'd suggest "neither." jpnyc's advice is on the money.

Any standard guitar that doesn't get in her way ("It's too heavy" "this neck is too thick" "This feels funny on my lap" "I think it's ugly" "All my girlfriends think it's ugly", etc.) will be good. It should be set up properly for relatively low action, with fairly light strings and no buzzing frets.

As for the learning process, there are a lot of possibilities. Books, DVDs, YouTube videos, online courses and that old standby, face-to-face lessons. There's good news and bad news in that last selection; she'll have someone to ask questions of who can give her immediate answers. But selection of a teacher is important. I taught guitar for a while at a small music store, but I was often just a lesson or two ahead of my best students myself. That they learned anything at all was a surprise. A teacher who starts her with decent technique and teaches her with patience and encouragement is probably the most important catalyst for her budding career.