#1
Iam open to anyones suggestions/advice/opinions. Specially interested in those who have a career in music/makes their living off music. Those with music degrees (even if its not in guitar), those who gig/tour and know from personal or shared experience how the music industry is like for guitarists in this day and age and economy, anyone who can contribute would be appreciated. Thanks


Would you recommend a guitarist to go to music college if they want to pursue a career in music?

In your opinion, do you think its plausible for a guitarist in america in 2014 to graduate from a music college and be able to pay off their student debt? In this day and age an economy, whats your opinion on someone going to music college to pursue a career in music? Anecdotes that are as true as possible would help me get a better idea on making my choice, giving me things to consider and help reflect on.

What about not going to college and just pursuing a career in music as a guitarist without a degree? How have you seen people with degrees and without them fair? (Please mention those you know or seen their career path unfold, but try to mention the average joe. Not necessarily the Steve Vai's and Frank Zappas, but your average person whos a guitar player that survives playing guitar and doing music related jobs.

Any kind of insight would be appreciated. Thank you in advance, again.
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The ideal path of this "career in music" I could see myself doing is as follows:

-Session work
-Original music (touring & recording artist)
-Guitar teacher
- Songwriting Composing (scoring for tv/film/movies/video games/commercials etc.)
-Freelance guitar player
___________________________________________________________________
Some background on me:

-Age: 24
-Location: New York City
-Genre/Styles: Metal, blues, classic rock, classical, & jazz
-Guitar Ability Level/Musical Skill: Intermediate
___________________________________________________________________
#2
Quote by Guitargasmic
Would you recommend a guitarist to go to music college if they want to pursue a career in music?


No.

In your opinion, do you think its plausible for a guitarist in america in 2014 to graduate from a music college and be able to pay off their student debt?


No

In this day and age an economy, whats your opinion on someone going to music college to pursue a career in music?


Lacking in real world applicable experience, desperate to get something.

Anecdotes that are as true as possible would help me get a better idea on making my choice, giving me things to consider and help reflect on.


Most of the music majors I have known are losers with no real talent. The ones with talent would be in the exact same position as if they hadn't gone to school... not gainfully employed in music beyond teaching lessons.

What about not going to college and just pursuing a career in music as a guitarist without a degree?


There are a million guitarists that are better than you and not much demand. If you want to seriously make a career, you need to start playing in a genre where there is more demand, so your only viable options are pop or pop country.

How have you seen people with degrees and without them fair? (Please mention those you know or seen their career path unfold, but try to mention the average joe. Not necessarily the Steve Vai's and Frank Zappas, but your average person whos a guitar player that survives playing guitar and doing music related jobs.


Either not working in music or working in a music store in retail or instruction.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#3
Depends on the subject. Some art courses are far far more beneficial than others and worth the investment (though with today's fees...), but unlike violin, tuba etc. guitar is and always has been something you don't strictly need education-bought connections and information from. You'd be better off working your ass off and building a name from the bottom up, as those fees make it simply too expensive and investment. There's also the question of whether you're considering this for finance or education. Which comes first to you? What can you get from college that you can't from books and tutors?

Unless you're the next great composer and/or go to the most reputable one in the country, in which case it could be worth it.And as Theogonia said above, it depends on your intentions. If you want to make money, pop. If you want to do what you want to do, you're gounna be poor. That's all art subjects right now. Even the big experimental names don't do great bar few.
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
Last edited by Banjocal at Nov 23, 2014,
#4
You'll get work, but only if you suck a LOT of dicks.

I had similar aspirations to me, but I renounced my pipe dreams and have gone for a better option -

Piano Technician
A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
Last edited by Pastafarian96 at Nov 23, 2014,
#5
You are 24? It's too late now m8.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#6
Neo's back.

huh.

cool.
A poem.
Quote by yoman297
no girl, movember isnt for you. shave your stache pls

I can out-bore you any day
#7
Don't ask the pit.
Ask a section of the forum that plays guitar or a section that contains intelligent life.
#8
First things first: do not define whether you consider university or college education 'worth it' based on whether you pay back your student loan. It's not just a financial investment, you go to university for personal development.

Having said that, it would be optimal for your personal development to study something more flexible. Example: my degree is in music technology. I went in thinking I'd do something like studio production for rock/pop music when I graduated, but while I was there I discovered lots of other things that I liked better and now I'm a sound designer and I do experimental music and stuff.

So my advice is DO go to university but DON'T go in thinking you know exactly what you want when you graduate, and pick a degree that will give you lots of options.
#9
Quote by institutions
Don't ask the pit.
Ask a section of the forum that plays guitar or a section that contains intelligent life.



This.


This thread has been done so many times here, and all you are going to get is a bunch of people who don't really know what they are talking about because they haven't actually been to college, or they didn't go for music and are just making assumptions. ESPECIALLY don't listen to theogonia


I'll tell you this. With hard work, you can make a career at anything.
Last edited by MeGaDeth2314 at Nov 23, 2014,
#10
Quote by institutions
Don't ask the pit.
Ask a section of the forum that plays guitar or a section that contains intelligent life.
AKA get off of ultimate-guitar.com
Name's Luca.

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I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
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Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
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#11
Quote by captainsnazz
First things first: do not define whether you consider university or college education 'worth it' based on whether you pay back your student loan. It's not just a financial investment, you go to university for personal development.

Having said that, it would be optimal for your personal development to study something more flexible. Example: my degree is in music technology. I went in thinking I'd do something like studio production for rock/pop music when I graduated, but while I was there I discovered lots of other things that I liked better and now I'm a sound designer and I do experimental music and stuff.

So my advice is DO go to university but DON'T go in thinking you know exactly what you want when you graduate, and pick a degree that will give you lots of options.

This guy man. This guy gets it. :')
#13
I studied music in college for a year and a half - left the course halfway through the second year. My course benefitted me in a few ways. First, my playing really improved. We had 3 really good guys teaching us and they opened my eyes and ears to new ways of learning guitar. I learnt a huge amount of music theory stuff which has helped me drastically too. My biggest problem with the course (and most education in my experience) is that it's not personalised. Most classes will have a few slackers in it who could slow down the lessons for everyone else. For example, my guitar exam in first year was simplified because a few people in the class didn't put any effort in to learn the difficult stuff, and the theory classes were kept simple to cater to some singers and drummers who didn't know the basic stuff, leaving a load of us sitting wasting time. Since I left I've been able to build on everything I learnt there at my own pace and I've gotten a lot better. I've also had more time to perform live.

I don't know much about music business or sound courses.


The guy below me mentioned networking... since I left college I've kept in touch with other musicians and sound engineers and have continued playing gigs with them. Meeting new people is a huge advantage of studying music - you're literally surrounded by people with similar interests.
Last edited by derek8520 at Nov 23, 2014,
#14
a) Going to music school will help you network
b)Make use of all the facilities in a music school
c) Interact with as many musicians as possible
d)Stay on top of your game and keep upping yourself
e) Keep working on your craft. If this is what you want to earn your living from then realise that you must dedicate a lot of time and effort towards it. "You reap what you sow" "The amount of excellence you have at something is directly proportional to how much time you spent achieving it"

Of course, this is all easier said than done but you get the drift. It is possible to make a living as a musician but as someone has already stated and i'll say it again differently, do NOT be close minded. As an artist that's the last thing you'd want to do.

Lastly, if you're willing to give it all for this industry (and it is a bitch) realise that there will be a lot of ups and down's (mostly downs) to begin with but keep your chin up and keep going.

Best of luck!
#15
Quote by stratkat
you could learn a lot in college, and it could help you build upon your portfolio, but really all that matters is a good portfolio.

Same with all art really.
Knowing the business side of it and being able to actually explain the philosophy and history of your work is also vital

worst thing is an artist who doesn't even know where their work comes from
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
#16
Quote by Banjocal
Knowing the business side of it and being able to actually explain the philosophy and history of your work is also vital

worst thing is an artist who doesn't even know where their work comes from

I imagine the person paying you to write a theme song or whatever doesn't care.

But yeah, if you're working with other musicians and knowing the buisness side is useful.
#17
I was talking more from a creative side and those involved in more experimental scenes rather than business
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
#18
Go in for general engineering, then specialize once you find out what suits you.


Get a real degree and a real job, you can always take courses for music as an elective.
Legato and fluidity in your playing is where it's at

DJENT!!
ಠ_ಠ
#19
Quote by Shredwizard445
Get a real degree and a real job,
grow up
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
#20
The only people I know who make a living off of music are old guys who play covers at bars and restaurants for 5+ hours, 5-6 days a week. Singing + guitar only, which is how they make more because they dont have to split with a band. But none of them really enjoy it. All the well respected musicians who've actually accomplished something have day jobs. Some of them have legit careers like IT technicians and some of them flip burgers.

You can have a career in music, just know that it wont be the career that pays your bills.
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Last edited by Wiegenlied at Nov 23, 2014,
#22
I'd like nothing more than to play guitar and sing for a living, but I'm too apprehensive to take such a risk.

What a great parallel to the paper I'm currently writing about the failures of capitalism.
#23
You might as well flip a coin for this.


A couple of factors,

If you are only "intermediate" at 24, I suggest that you might look for a non-musical career and be an amateur musician.

If you wanted to be a star I would suggest you find the best band you can in the latest rising genre. But you appear to only want to be a jobbing musician.
#24
Quote by Banjocal
grow up



I did
Legato and fluidity in your playing is where it's at

DJENT!!
ಠ_ಠ
#26
Quote by captainsnazz
what happened then


he didn't get a music job because he has no talent and is an loser
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#27
Quote by theogonia777
he didn't get a music job because he has no talent and is an loser








@Hewhoissnazz

I started my undergrad for biochem, and started interning in a biolab. Now I play hindustani classical stuff on a fretless guitar for brown people weddings and crooner covers (sinatra dean martin etc) for less $ at a couple venues
Legato and fluidity in your playing is where it's at

DJENT!!
ಠ_ಠ
Last edited by Shredwizard445 at Nov 23, 2014,