#1
So I have a Schecter c-1 Elite with DiMarzio Joe and Fred pickups in it. My dilemma is that I am not really digging how much natural sustain the guitar has and the pickups have issues cutting out from time to time. I've rewired the jack and cleaned the contacts, but it still happens. For this reason, I have been thinking of getting a new guitar...Well along with the fact it's just fun to look for one to buy haha.

My issue is this...I have a lot of different options I am looking at. I currently like the PRS SE Custom 24. Agile has the Hawker, which I gather is close. I have also considered some Ibanez options. What I can't decide is if I should replace my current guitar with a similar style, or get another agile or some used guitar in the 300-500 range as an accent guitar. I like to play mostly rock such at Alter Bridge, Metallica, Staind, Pink Floyd and so forth. I wouldn't mind also getting into some Breaking Benjamin stuff that has a bit heavier of a feel.

My skill level isn't terribly high. I can play fairly cleanly, just not fast (which is something I would like to change). That keeps my current music choices in slower paced songs. Is it possible to fix poor sustain in a guitar? I would imagine probably not considering the guitar is set up pretty well. No fret buzz, offset where it needs to be, relative medium action. I think I want to avoid having a licking trem like a floyd simply because I am not a huge fan of having to bust out a wrench if I want to change tunings. This isn't a deal breaker, but just a small preference.

Help me decide what to do, because I can't make up my mind!
Last edited by lilcurtis at Nov 23, 2014,
#2
have you checked your chords and the wiring on the pickups themselves. if the pickups aren't working properly then a loss of sustain can certainly result. I'd have all that checked before I dumped the guitar
#3
Is it difficult to rewire everything if I need new wires? I could take it to Guitar Center, but I feel like they will end up charging me $100+ for it.
#4
Quote by lilcurtis
Is it difficult to rewire everything if I need new wires? I could take it to Guitar Center, but I feel like they will end up charging me $100+ for it.


most likely it would be a bad solder connection. give them a call describe the problem and see what they say.
#5
Quote by lilcurtis
SNo fret buzz, offset where it needs to be, relative medium action. I think I want to avoid having a licking trem like a floyd simply because I am not a huge fan of having to bust out a wrench if I want to change tunings.


I hate having a licking trem. Tickles.

Major sustain:

Neck-through guitar with a small but very dense *solid* body (LP style works fine). Mahogany or denser wood on the neck Mine mostly have ebony fretboards. I have my frets superglued (this actually makes a difference -- see the StewMac newsletter referencing this) and PLEK'd (no fret buzz at very low action levels.

The pickups are NOT close to the strings (magnetic flux can actually affect the string motion) The bridge is solid and dense (the old Schaller harmonica bridges are great for this, or see the Old Ibanez Gibralter bridges). And the really seriously well sustaining guitars have a 10.5 ounce solid brass sustain block screwed (routed) into the body, and the bridge is screwed into that. See the old late '70's and early '80's Ibanez Artist AR-300 and the Yamaha SG-2000.
#6
Quote by lilcurtis
I think I want to avoid having a licking trem like a floyd simply because I am not a huge fan of having to bust out a wrench if I want to change tunings.


I have a Line 6 Variax JTV 89F. It comes with a locking (not licking) Floyd Rose and the Variax electronics allow me to select virtually any tuning without having to bust out a wench. Or...uh...a wrench.
#7
I don't like having a wet hand while playing, therefor I didn't want a licking trem

I think right now I still plan on getting a used PRS SE Custom 24. Then from there I can decide to keep both, or sell one.
#8
Here's the StewMac newsletter regarding supergluing frets:

http://www.stewmac.com/How-To/Online_Resources/Neck_Building_and_Repair_and_Setup/Super_glue_your_frets_for_better_tone.html

I did NOT do this myself (or I would have probably had a sticky mess). But the tech I use has apparently done this for years. Says it absolutely helps eliminate "flyer" frets and dead frets. Custom builders often glue their frets (usually with titebond) when they're building up the fretboard, but manufacturers usually don't do that in a production environment. I personally think it makes a difference in the sound of the guitar.