#1
My son just started playing guitar a couple of months ago. I got him a J.Reynolds and practice amp for 40.00. Just recently a really nice acoustic for his birthday (13th). He can't/wont put the guitars down. Homework and chores are taking a back seat to his new hobby. It's a problem but a good one. So for xmas he's getting a Peavey VK 1200 from granny. I got him a pedal already, MXR Classic distortion, and picked up a Bad Monkey last night (suggestion from another thread, stocking stuffer for xmas). So he will have a distortion pedal and a OD pedal.

I stopped by a music store and told them what amp and guitar he will have, told me that the amp already has distortion and overdrive. No need to get those kind of pedals. Steered me towards chorus or flanger type.

My son has delved himself into Floyd, Zeppelin, Hedrix, Who, you know where I'm going. So when I explained to the clerk what bands he's into, he steered me towards fuzz and faze pedals (Big Muff, FuzzFace).

When I look at some of these CL ads, I see where ppl have 6-10 pedals for sale. I can see where this search for the perfect tone can get out of hand.

My thoughts: he's got two pedals to play around with. Let him figure out what he's going to want. Youtube will be his friend. But.... I still want to hear from the community here so I can at least be somewhat educated and steer him in the direction he thinks he wants to go. So many pedals......

So what pedals will give him the classic 70's rock sound (if I don't have them already)? I'm guessing there's 1000's of variables here. Just looking for a good starting point.

Thanks for reading.
#2
the distortion probably wont be the sound hes after however the OD is a great choce and will help achive the sound that he wants.

a chorus is always a good place to start when looking into modulation type effects.
check out: EHX small clone or if you wanna go a bit more versatile the TC electronic corona chorus. If hes after specific tones and a tiny size go for the mini one(bit cheaper) but the full one is great.

a delay pedal would be another good addition. There are tons and tons out there.
Personally as he is starting out a digital delay with lots of options would be a good place to look. Any secong hand boss would do. (dd3 up to dd7 depending on how much you want to spend.) or i have heard excellent things about the Hardwire DL-8 (trying to get my hands on a second hand one myself atm).

Wahs are pretty much essential for any 70s based sound.
Cry babys are the industry standard but everyone has their own taste.

As for Fuzz.....
There are way too many options for me to go into here...
However you can pick up many clones of stuff like the fuzz face for cheap.

Big Muff is a good place to start, mixed reviews around here but has been used by so many pros you cant really not look at it.

Hope that helps
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#4
You're on the right track with the fuzzes. As you noticed, though, pedals are like bananas in that they only come in bunches.

I think the best thing you could do would be to get a Line 6 M5 or M9 (or other similar quality multi-fx). They have a ton of different effects, most of them pretty good. That way he can mess around with flanger and chorus and phaser and pitch shifter and several types of reverb and delay and looper without buying each of those pedals individually. It's not a perfect replacement for all of those pedals, but it will cut down a lot on the "I have 15 pedals but I still need a third delay because none of mine do a dotted eighth with tap tempo" syndrome, which gets really expensive in a hurry. It also models a handful of fuzzes so he can get the flavor of them before deciding which one to buy.
#5
You're off to a good start.

Amplifying *ahem* what Roc8995 said, a good multieffects (MFX) unit of some kind is a good way to let someone experiment with tones without breaking the bank and filling big plastic tubs with pedals.

Personally, I prefer the portable digital modelers to the MFX pedals.* Portable digital modelers are devices about the same size as an old portable cassette player that operate on battery or DC power. Here is a visual comparison of (left to right) Tascam, my PX-5 and one of my Px4s to my old Aiwa cassette player:



Besides the ability to simulate a variety of amps and pedals, they are typically loaded with features like a tuner, metronome, drum samples, and some kind of recording and/or computer interface. Because of their size, they'll fit nicely in most guitar cases, giving you the ability to practice anywhere you can carry your guitar. They're usually used with headphones- meaning you don't disturb others when you play- but also work with amps just like guitar pedals. They cost anywhere from $99-300 new, and are made by companies like Korg, Line6, Boss, Tascam and others.


* but I have a MFX pedal, too.
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#6
Quote by Grumpy_one


I stopped by a music store and told them what amp and guitar he will have, told me that the amp already has distortion and overdrive. No need to get those kind of pedals. Steered me towards chorus or flanger type.



Yes Valveking has a distortion channel and chances are a much better one than the MXR Classic Distortion box has. But overdrive pedal is a different beast. Yes technically it is just a low gain distortion box but the shopkeeper is probably not aware of its other uses (and quite frankly possibly the most common reason people use one with their rigs costing thousands of dollars).

Usually people use overdrive pedal to boost the dirt channel of tube amps. For example classic hard rock bands kick one one solos to get more compression and dirt. Heavy metal players like me one the other hand have tend to just boost the living shit out of their amps (on pedal maxed volume and gain/dirt off) and have it on all the time. The amp they use may have all the distortion they need but usually the amp just sounds better with gain turned down a bit and then hammering the amp with overdrive.

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#7
I think your son needs a nice MFX board. A POD HD 500/500x, HD desktop, BOSS GT100 or maybe a ME80. He can mess around with different a hundred or so effects (plus amps, cab, mic, settings) till kingdom come and it will cost you less in the end.
#8
Seems that I disagree with some of the above. Do NOT give him a multiFX pedal (IMHO). From personal experience I can tell you that they can be way to much resulting in a distraction from the playing. Instead of noodlin' about your son could get lost in miles and miles of menu's. Fine tweaking microseconds of delay, decay of reverbs and other mumbojumbo a starting guitarist doesn't need. Let him focus on his playing instead.

What I would recommend is a way pedal. Or a tuner pedal! Very handy and a investment on the long term since they don't really effect your sound but are always usefull. I wish someone would have thought me the importances of being in tune when I started

But yeah that or a way pedal.
#9
A crybaby or some kind of wah would be a good gift. Also maybe a delay pedal. These effects are less subtle than chorus type effects. The crybaby is pretty essential for Hendrix, and a delay pedal does lots of different stuff that would keep a kid busy.
#10
Quote by Roc8995
You're on the right track with the fuzzes. As you noticed, though, pedals are like bananas in that they only come in bunches.

I think the best thing you could do would be to get a Line 6 M5 or M9 (or other similar quality multi-fx). They have a ton of different effects, most of them pretty good. That way he can mess around with flanger and chorus and phaser and pitch shifter and several types of reverb and delay and looper without buying each of those pedals individually. It's not a perfect replacement for all of those pedals, but it will cut down a lot on the "I have 15 pedals but I still need a third delay because none of mine do a dotted eighth with tap tempo" syndrome, which gets really expensive in a hurry. It also models a handful of fuzzes so he can get the flavor of them before deciding which one to buy.


+1

Quote by MaaZeus
Yes Valveking has a distortion channel and chances are a much better one than the MXR Classic Distortion box has. But overdrive pedal is a different beast. Yes technically it is just a low gain distortion box but the shopkeeper is probably not aware of its other uses (and quite frankly possibly the most common reason people use one with their rigs costing thousands of dollars).

Usually people use overdrive pedal to boost the dirt channel of tube amps. For example classic hard rock bands kick one one solos to get more compression and dirt. Heavy metal players like me one the other hand have tend to just boost the living shit out of their amps (on pedal maxed volume and gain/dirt off) and have it on all the time. The amp they use may have all the distortion they need but usually the amp just sounds better with gain turned down a bit and then hammering the amp with overdrive.


+1

(though the classic distortion may well do a different flavour of distortion than the amp and may well still be worth hanging onto)
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#11
Quote by jhymadesh
Seems that I disagree with some of the above. Do NOT give him a multiFX pedal (IMHO). From personal experience I can tell you that they can be way to much resulting in a distraction from the playing. Instead of noodlin' about your son could get lost in miles and miles of menu's. Fine tweaking microseconds of delay, decay of reverbs and other mumbojumbo a starting guitarist doesn't need. Let him focus on his playing instead.

What I would recommend is a way pedal. Or a tuner pedal! Very handy and a investment on the long term since they don't really effect your sound but are always usefull. I wish someone would have thought me the importances of being in tune when I started

But yeah that or a way pedal.


A work mate here just told me the same thing, spent too much time fiddling around with it instead of just playing, he sold right away. He plays bass from time time in a band.

Quote by rickyvanh
A crybaby or some kind of wah would be a good gift. Also maybe a delay pedal. These effects are less subtle than chorus type effects. The crybaby is pretty essential for Hendrix, and a delay pedal does lots of different stuff that would keep a kid busy.


One on CL 40.00 dunlop, might consider it and call it good. Then he's on his own. He has chores and makes money. He'll have a real good start I'm thinking.
#12
I'm also anti-muliFX , including amp modelers, because I found them way too much of a distraction. IMO, there are already too many variables in producing electric guitar tones without adding to the confusion. It's a case of finding a balance between a satisfying tone that will keep him interested and having him spend all his time messing about with interesting sounds.
#13
Personally, I find the modelers help me make my purchases. I get to try out different tones, then go looking for pedals to match/improve upon what the modelers deliver.

But these are personality issues.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#14
mentioned this before but will say this again. don't sweat the fx so much now. I'd get an overdrive (you said on other thread you already have bad monkey so you're good) and perhaps a wha which was a very used effect in the 70s. down the road a delay will come in handy. chorus is more 80s (but still very useful), phaser or flanger are cool but not essential (once again great fx though). fuzz is fun but is a bit of an art form to use for the best tone.

I strongly suggest just getting a good basic tone and have your son concentrate on the playing end of things for now. plenty of time later for the icing stuff. I play a great deal of 70s stuff (this was the soundtrack of my teen years) and much of it doesn't require a ton of fx.
#15
As he starts to figure out which guitarists' tone he wishes to emulate most, he'll have more concrete and defined needs.

For instance, if he loves David Gilmour's tone, he might want to track down a rotary pedal of some kind, since DG uses a bit of that in many of his tunes. He doesn't use it full bore, just as a way to flavor his tone in unique ways.

Here's a demo of "Shine on you crazy diamond" with a guy using a Boss Rt-20. (I have one- it's a gooooood pedal.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0QrXsrPAFIc&sns=em
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#16
Delay, chorus and flange are probably the most popular after what he already has but I think maybe some kind of all in one phrase trainer/practice solution might be a better idea, or even lessons with someone locally that you think is good. Don't get him used on too much gear, he might just go the whiny route and waste time switching amps for the next coolest thing, etc. I think what you got him so far is more than perfect.