#1
just got a heavily gigged/toured road worn used Egnater Tourmaster 4100. sounds great looks like shit haha id like to throw on new tolex... maybe red or sea foam green but I'm wondering what materials will i need? and where can i get them? not looking to order stuff on the internet.

i have no experience doing this. should i just pay someone to do it. or is it not as hard as i think. i want it to look pro.
Godin Passion RG-3
Gibson SG Standard
Egnater Tourmaster 4100
Fender Blues Deluxe Reissue
Marshall JVM215C
JHS Sweet Tea V2
Guyatone WRM5
TC Flashback Delay
#2
If you want it to look pro, have someone do it for you.

I've given up on Tolex, unless the amp is going to sit around the house and look pretty.

I'm doing one of two things, these days, with any speaker cabinet that leaves the house.

1. I'm painting it with Duratex. This is a sort of rubberized, textured paint that can be put on with a roller (or sprayed), and that shows up on most pro audio gear these days. It's available in colors, it doesn't rip or tear like tolex, it's much more durable than tolex, and it's very easy to repair. It's available in colors and/or if you start with a white version, it can be colored as standard paint is.

2. I'm having the cabinet hosed down with Line X. This adds at least an eighth of an inch to the cabinet and it's brutal (to other cabinets) and structural. Adds a little weight. Also available in colors. This stuff is SO tough the military is using it for explosion mitigation (check out the military application stuff on the Line X website). Mythbusters (TV show) gets giddy with it, trying it for all kinds of stuff, and there are a bunch of videos of people dropping a NON LineX'd something or other off the side of a building compared to one that's been sprayed.

If it's something like a 4x12 and a tube head cabinet, you're already hauling a certain amount of weight. A couple of pounds more won't make a difference, but the cabinets will be feared by any other cabinets you pack around them. Note that I didn't suggest Rhino or any of the other pickup truck bed liners, NOR did I suggest the stuff that comes in cans. Take the cabinets to a Line X dealer. This stuff goes on hot (it's actually two parts that are mixed at the tip of the sprayer) and is ready to handle within a few minutes. It'll continue to cure for a couple of days, but after that, it's tougher than nails.
#3
Quote by jon_six

...i have no experience doing this. should i just pay someone to do it...


Yes. It is every bit as hard as you think it is and then some.

I like the sound of the coatings noted previously, from a practical point of view, but would be concerned that they would completely remove any residual value the gear might otherwise have.
#4
Quote by John Sims
Yes. It is every bit as hard as you think it is and then some.

I like the sound of the coatings noted previously, from a practical point of view, but would be concerned that they would completely remove any residual value the gear might otherwise have.


If it's well done (as in "looks good"), it shouldn't.

Bass players have been handing Duratex'd gear around for a while now, Pro Audio has made it all but standard, though there may still be a few places that use that old "mouse fur" covering. NO one in Pro Audio does tolex. Line-X as a speaker cabinet coating is a relatively recent concept (though I did it several years ago) and has only two drawbacks: weight and expense. It'll add a pound or two to your gear, and if you have cheap gear, it's probably not worth doing.

Guitar players, of course, are often sixty years behind with this stuff.

On a similar note; I redid a Carvin Belair (originally in faux tolex "tweed") with real tweed and lacquered it. That was a bit of a mistake, in that real tweed is MUCH thicker than tolex, so radii and corners had to be re-thunk. The lacquering process made the cabinet nearly indestructible. That poor amp went through the mill and came out looking a bit dirty (a few circular stains from adult beverages) but untorn and unbowed. The same amp wrapped in tolex would have been a study in shreds and rips.

The cabinets I had done in Line-X took a beating, but you can't tell it. No rips, no tears, no dings. Tolexed cabinets that went through the same treatment look like they've been through a zombie apocalypse.