#1
I want to start recording some stuff and put it together with a couple of my buddies but i don't really know anything about recording. What i want to know is what equipment do i need to effectively record (what goes between the mic and the computer) as well as good price effective gear that will get the job done well.

I would like specific gear and an explanation on what it does.

Thanks!
#3
For an amateur just starting out, I'd recommend the following:
- A DAW to record, mix and master your recordings. Something like Reaper or Mixcraft.
- A decent set of speakers or headphones. You don't need expensive studio monitors for amateur recordings, just something with a decent flat frequency response and range. The best way to learn how to mix is to learn by doing, but there are lots of guides on how to do this online.
- Although not necessary, a cheap audio interface with the appropriate drivers would be good. Something like a Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 USB interface. It'll clean up your sound and help with latency issues. However, you can record straight through the microphone/line-in input of your computer.
- If on a budget, I'd recommend a single dynamic mic for all recording. A Shure SM57 would be perfect. Drums can be recorded with a single mic. Bass can be recorded straight through audio interface/line-in to your computer. Guitar can be recorded through a decent cabinet and mic, although if you're limited by a budget you may want to use VST cabinet simulation, like the LePou Plugins: LeCab2 Impulse loader. Use the dynamic mic for recording vocals. If you want to spend a bit more, buy a condenser mic as well. This will enable you to record drums with 2 mics in one of the following ways:

1) Roomy: Condenser: Snare + Kick (+ Toms), Dynamic: Room + Overheads
OR
2) Tight: Condenser: Snare + Toms, Dynamic: Kick

Hope this helps!
Last edited by Joeseye at Nov 27, 2014,
#4
Quote by Joeseye
- If on a budget, I'd recommend a single dynamic mic for all recording. A Shure SM57 would be perfect. Drums can be recorded with a single mic.

Drums can sort-be recorded with a single omni-directional condenser microphone, not with a 57.

Quote by Joeseye

1) Roomy: Condenser: Snare + Kick (+ Toms), Dynamic: Room + Overheads
OR
2) Tight: Condenser: Snare + Toms, Dynamic: Kick

That has got to be one of the worst suggestions I've seen for drum mic setups. Firstly, most directional condensers (like TS would probably buy unless he's specifically told to look for a different pattern) aren't going to pick up the snare and kick, or snare and toms evenly. There's nowhere you could put the mic that would do that without it getting washed out by the cymbals.
Dynamic for a room/overhead mic is also terrible. Most dynamics (like the 57 you recommended) are specifically designed to pick up as little as possible from outside the space just infront of it. To put all cymbals in it's capture area you'd have to raise it too high for it to pick them up at a reasonable volume. And a cardioid dynamic mic directly above a kit will pick up jack all good room sounds because it'll be drowned out by whatever of the kit it is actually picking up.
#5
Chatterbox is right. Joeseye, your advice is not good or useful. Sorry, I'm not trying to be a jerk or to insult you, but it's just the way it is.

Also, how is an interface not necessary for recording? Plugging guitars, basses and microphones straight into the computer is awful.

Enisa, which instruments do you want to record?
#6
Everyone seems to think that using a daw and interface is the only way to record this century. Get a stand alone 8 or 16 track. Zoom R16 has 8 inputs, 8 track simultaneous recording. 16 track playback. Its portable. Has condenser mics for grabbing ideas down fast or throwing in a corner at rehearsal to record and playback to let the drummer know how out of time he is. lol. Starting this way teaches you the basics of line input level, bouncing, panning etc. Basic skills you need. Also works as a daw interface when you want to FIZZ UP your mixes with some VST plugins. Ability to transfer recorded material to DAW via USB and enables you to mix down to the fantastically modern, 20 yr old MP3 format. The same as everything else.There are other options out there. As listed above. But try taking your PC interface monitors etc to a gig in your bag when a mate asks you to record their band.
#7
Quote by crackerjack123
Everyone seems to think that using a daw and interface is the only way to record this century. Get a stand alone 8 or 16 track. Zoom R16 has 8 inputs, 8 track simultaneous recording. 16 track playback. Its portable. Has condenser mics for grabbing ideas down fast or throwing in a corner at rehearsal to record and playback to let the drummer know how out of time he is. lol. Starting this way teaches you the basics of line input level, bouncing, panning etc. Basic skills you need. Also works as a daw interface when you want to FIZZ UP your mixes with some VST plugins. Ability to transfer recorded material to DAW via USB and enables you to mix down to the fantastically modern, 20 yr old MP3 format. The same as everything else.There are other options out there. As listed above. But try taking your PC interface monitors etc to a gig in your bag when a mate asks you to record their band.

No most people (not everyone) think it's the most flexible way to record. Firstly, the entry price is lower. I doubt you'd find any multitrackers cheaper than the zoom, but I can record guitar's for ~$10 through a guitar link with amp sims, or grab a blue icicle for ~$60 to record with a microphone.
The chances of someone with a $300 interface/multitracker having the equipment to record a full kit (all the microphones, a good sounding room, etc.) are slim to none. And a kit recorded in a crap room will sound crap.
16 tracks is great if you know what to do with them, but I know I couldn't record 90% of my stuff with that (I'd be lucky to get all the vocals on that).
And if a mate asks you to multitrack his band live at a gig you tell them no way. There is absolutely 0 chance of you getting a good sound out of that. The people who make all those live videos on youtube can't do it well, what on earth makes you think a beginner can?
Also I've taken a laptop and interface to gigs a couple of times, it's not too hard really.
#8
Multitrackers can be the right answer....for a hobbyist wanting the easiest way to record themselves at home.

For someone wanting to record a band playing a gig, you're talking about getting some serious pro equipment for anything decent. If all you're after is a basic recording of the gig for reference purposes, then a handheld record like the Zoom H4 or one of the many equivalents would be best.

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