#1
Hi, I am trying to improve my soloing and trying to sound different, versus playing the same riffs over and over again so I want to learn the movable shapes of the aeolian mode, I am looking for something similar to this: http://www.coniferguitar.com/Blues_scales_for_guitar/Em_sixnote_blues_scale/Em_sixnote_blues_scale.html is this the best way to learn scales? I know I should know where all the notes are to construct each scale, anyway I want but I cant remember ALL the notes and where they are so for now I -think- I should just learn the patterns as I am more of a visual learner, is this the right thing to do? Please help, thanks.
#2
Here you go... colour of circles gives the intervals. (See bottom of each picture for colour assigned to each interval). These shapes would just all slide along the neck. The red circle is the 1 of the scale.











cheers, Jerry
#3
Quote by Frenetixx
Hi, I am trying to improve my soloing and trying to sound different, versus playing the same riffs over and over again so I want to learn the movable shapes of the aeolian mode, I am looking for something similar to this: http://www.coniferguitar.com/Blues_scales_for_guitar/Em_sixnote_blues_scale/Em_sixnote_blues_scale.html is this the best way to learn scales? I know I should know where all the notes are to construct each scale, anyway I want but I cant remember ALL the notes and where they are so for now I -think- I should just learn the patterns as I am more of a visual learner, is this the right thing to do? Please help, thanks.


easy to understand patterns...

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to play them in E, simply play them where the root (colored note) = E

for example play pattern 1 but with the root at the 12th fret, which is E.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Nov 28, 2014,
#4
I see you are interested in the fingering shapes for modes? would you be interested in testing an android app that shows them all to you?

let me know.

reply here or pm.

scbeebe.
#5
The best advice I can give you is to derive these shapes yourself.

You know one position. Use it to find the others and write them down. Use your ear. Use your ability to find octaves and unisons.

You don't have to memorize all the note names, not yet ... but try deriving the shapes yourself, and then play them to make sure that they all sound the same.