#1
Hi everyone,

I was hoping you'd be able to help me. There's a certain guitar tone that I find completely elusive. Clapton is probably the best example of it, like at 0.43 here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0YLtzUJQnuo

Jack White also often comes close.

It's obviously high-gain, but there's a thickness and a sort of raggedness to the distortion that I'm just not able to even approximate. My guess is that there's perhaps some compression there, which really emphasises the attack? But beyond that I'm unsure!

I'm using a humbucker guitar into a tiny terror with a 1x12 cabinet.

Any ideas appreciated!

Thanks!
#3
Dimed Fender Tweed amp, strat on bridge PU with tone rolled off to taste, and maybe a TS9 for boost. I also hear a bit of flange or chorus on that track. Classic Clapton tone.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#4
To me it sounds like both the preamp and power amp are pretty distorted and it's the interaction between the different sources of distortion that is giving it that gritty quality.

What I am going to suggest is going to be VERY loud even on the 7 watt setting on the amp, but should work pretty well - Set the amp to a moderately overdriven setting at lower volumes - the minimum amount of gain where it still "feels" like an overdriven sound, for example. Then turn the master volume all the way up!

I think a lot of the attack and "raggedness" is down to the fact it sounds like Clapton used a strat with single coils here, though.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#5
Thanks everyone!

I think I've just given my neighbours tinnitus trying to dime the amp, but no real luck there.

Whilst I don't think Clapton uses fuzz, I think that might be my best route to approximating the sound with my current amp and guitar. I've got a line6 thing that I think does fuzz hanging around somewhere, so I'll give that a try...
#6
Quote by Blompcube
To me it sounds like both the preamp and power amp are pretty distorted and it's the interaction between the different sources of distortion that is giving it that gritty quality.


+1

or maybe fuzz.

one of the two.
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#7
I would also look into the mods Clapton has going on in just about all of his strats. Besides the noiseless pickups, he uses a 15db mid boost circuit which give his single coils an almost humbucker sound. Also has a treble or bass boost that acts close to an eq. More info of those on the Fender site for his signature guitars. When I'm looking for that particular Clapton tone in the video, I use my amp's mid boost along with an overdrive pedal. Then I'll usually use the neck pick up or bridge and middle (strat player btw) and roll the tone back a bit and volume accordingly with how much bite I'd like.