#1
DI Out same thing as direct out on an amp?


Is DI Out the same thing as direct out on an amp? Or is this perhaps considered just line out?

Example:

This AER amp has an xlr di out.

Thanks
#2
Yes.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#3
Quote by Cajundaddy
Yes.



What about line out vs direct out? Same thing?

This ampeg amp has an xlr output labeled on the amp as xlr line out, however in the specs, the amp is described as having Balanced direct out.

Does this amp have line out or direct out?
#4
Quote by bachfantasia
What about line out vs direct out? Same thing?

This ampeg amp has an xlr output labeled on the amp as xlr line out, however in the specs, the amp is described as having Balanced direct out.

Does this amp have line out or direct out?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Line_level

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DI_unit

not exactly the same thing, but i think for your purposes they'll both do what you pretty much need them to do.

line level outputs can be balanced or unbalanced. you typically plug these into another device's 'line level input'.

direct out is exclusively balanced (usually an XLR output). you should plug these signals into a 'microphone' input.

both signals seem to provide a similar impedance (100 ohms +) but i think the line level operates at a higher voltage.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

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#5
Functionally a line out, direct out, and DI out are the same thing for the same purpose. Some are balanced, some are +4db, some are -10db, and some are "cab voiced". They all allow you to run a signal to the mixing board and avoid needing a mic. A good thing to have especially for bass.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#6
So "Line Out" and "Direct Out" are or are not the same thing? I've tried researching this elsewhere too, but can't seem to get a straight answer. From the amps I have investigated, I have seen outputs labeled as Line Out with both 1/4" jacks and XLR jacks in addition to seeing amp output connections labeled as Direct Out with both 1/4" Jacks and XLR jacks.

Are these two terms synonymous and different amp brands just choose to use both terms depending on how they want to label their amps, or are these two types of outputs indeed the different types of outputs? Sorry for the confusion.

Thanks.
#7
Quote by bachfantasia
So "Line Out" and "Direct Out" are or are not the same thing? I've tried researching this elsewhere too, but can't seem to get a straight answer. From the amps I have investigated, I have seen outputs labeled as Line Out with both 1/4" jacks and XLR jacks in addition to seeing amp output connections labeled as Direct Out with both 1/4" Jacks and XLR jacks.

Are these two terms synonymous and different amp brands just choose to use both terms depending on how they want to label their amps, or are these two types of outputs indeed the different types of outputs? Sorry for the confusion.

Thanks.



Ummmm, see post below. Yes functionally they are the same thing.

Within the "category" of line out/direct out/DI out you will still find some differences in output gain, line balance, and voice emulation. It's the same as bass, treble, and mid controls on different amps. Functionally they do the same thing but may have different shelving points and slopes. They serve the same purpose but are not identical circuits.

Does this make any sense to you?
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#8
Quote by Cajundaddy
Ummmm, see post below. Yes functionally they are the same thing.

Within the "category" of line out/direct out/DI out you will still find some differences in output gain, line balance, and voice emulation. It's the same as bass, treble, and mid controls on different amps. Functionally they do the same thing but may have different shelving points and slopes. They serve the same purpose but are not identical circuits.

Does this make any sense to you?


Yes, this makes sense. What about Emulated Out? Is this essentially the same as well?
#9
Yes, stop thinkng about it, your making my head hurt
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#10
Quote by Robbgnarly
Yes, stop thinkng about it, your making my head hurt


+1
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#11
Thanks guys.

So basically what is happening is that depending on the brand, an amp will be labeled various things (direct out, line out, emulated line out, etc...) but this is all referring to the same thing, which is using this line out to hook up to a mixer without the need of a direct box, or other similar uses?

Basically there is no written rule that says an amp needs to label this feature a specific way, so regardless of what it is called, or what type of jacks it has (xlr, 1/4", etc.. ) it is the same thing?

Thanks.
#12
Yeah you got it
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#13
Well, a DI is supposed to be balanced so, XLR. If it's a phono plug it will be unbalanced even though the voltage levels are the same. You will probably get away with it but it is sub-optimal.
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#14
Quote by Cathbard
Well, a DI is supposed to be balanced so, XLR. If it's a phono plug it will be unbalanced even though the voltage levels are the same. You will probably get away with it but it is sub-optimal.



Thank you. I think I understand. I just get confused because there are so many exceptions depending on the brand.

Examples:

DI but it's not XLR
The Laney Ironhear 15w head has a quarter inch output jack labeled as Line Emulated DI.

Balanced Line out but it's not XLR
The Traynor K1 Keyboard Amp has a quarter inch jack labeled as Bal. Line Out.


Direct Out but it's not XLR
The Line 6 Spider IV HD150 has a quarter inch jack labeled as Phones/Direct Out.

Described as both balanced and unbalanced with an XLR jack.
In the user manual, the Momark TA 500 Bass Head is described as "This balanced XLR (8) output" in the rear panel description and as "LINE OUT unbalanced" in the MOMARK Amplifier SECTIONS Technical Details section.


Are such examples just an exception to the rule, or do you think they are not labeled accurately?

Thanks.
Last edited by bachfantasia at Dec 9, 2014,
#15
You're over-thinking it. All of those are producing the same sorts of voltage and would work. Balanced is preferable but not necessary. A balanced phono plug is a stereo plug where shield is earth, tip and ring are the two legs of the signal. To use it as a DI box you would need a cable with stereo phono on one end and XLR on the other.
DI is a term used for direct injection into a desk. Most desks and drop boxes are XLR's so your normal DI box is balanced XLR to make DI'ing your signal easy, otherwise you need an adapter. So it's not exactly direct, is it? All a DI box is actually doing is providing a hot enough signal to drive through the multicore to the desk.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band