#1
I'm not trying to sound arrogant or like an asshole, but how does knowing all the notes on the fretboard improve one's ability to play the guitar?

I wish I paid more attention in music theory in high school 25 years ago! I love to "play" the guitar (just for me), and I know I suck. But I still like it. I was wishing that someone could tell me something, then bang! I finally get it. But I know it doesn't work that way. I do realize to play the guitar you need at least 3 qualities: Passion, Practice, and Patience. What the hell, lets just throw in another Practice, for good measure! Lol. Any advice would be truly apprectiative.

I humbly thank you all!
#2
I think it's one of those things that won't instantly by itself make you a monster player, but I doubt it's going to hurt either. (I don't know all the notes instantly but I can work them out given a few seconds.)
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#3
I find it helps me understand the scales. By having an idea where the notes are I am better at finding the patterns which help when improvising. Plus now that I am doing this for fun, being 42 years old, I actually enjoy learning it.
#4
It helps for obvious stuff like finding notes/chords people are talking about without hearing anything.

But for me, the big strength is fast mobility. Like, if you're playing a G7 on the 3rd fret, you can easily know you can play that higher up on the 10th, where you can get a different sound for it.

You can do that with any note also.

It can also help you work things out a little faster.

But most of the time, everything needs to be so fast and so smooth that you don't have time to realize what the name of anything is. You think of the sound of the sound you want and miliseconds later you're playing it.

I find every approach is good. Do you want to be as good as you can be? Do you want to just know a couple of songs?

I find pattern and degree more important I think, but note names is good too.
#5
It makes a difference when you're soloing over non-diatonic progressions.

eg, you're in C, but playing a Bb major chord. It helps to be able to switch all your Bs into Bbs in your scale without thinking about it.
#6
Easy: knowing the fretboard means you know where all the notes are. So, if you want/need to play an A note, you know already where all the A notes possible are.
#7
Quote by HotspurJr
It makes a difference when you're soloing over non-diatonic progressions.

eg, you're in C, but playing a Bb major chord. It helps to be able to switch all your Bs into Bbs in your scale without thinking about it.

Without thinking about it? Doubt it.
#8
My advice is learn intervals (very easy to nail these), and learn enough of the fretboard notes (say on E and A strings) to get you some landmarks, and then apply octave shapes to find same pitches in other octaves.

If you have the intervals down, they'll reinforce your memory for scale shapes and chord shapes. And you don't need a single note name for that. But of course you do need a note name to pin these down somewhere on the neck.

And learn to recognise by ear these intervals, measured against the key note, as they crop up in a progression based on a key.

cheers, Jerry
#10
Im curently just starting to learn the fretboard, since i recently started taking lessons. My teacher showed me this way: get a backing track that has a simple 4 chord progression in C major. Then you figure out what notes are in which chords. Then you play along the track, only playing the notes that are in the chord that is currently playing. You start by only focusing on one octave of the C major scale, and after you have that one down, you go one higher or one lower, and then try to connect them. And after you have the Cmajor scale notes down, you go for the other scales, for example G major. I usually record my own backing track and then play over it. Its pretty cool, and the progress seems quite fast to me.
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#12
Quote by Elintasokas
Without thinking about it? Doubt it.


Your doubts are misplaced.

So much of what goes on in creating music happens at a subconscious place. As my ear was starting to develop, I found myself sometimes incorporating non-diatonic chord tones without even knowing that's what was going on.

I use language metaphors a lot, but they're apt. You don't have to think at all to take a sentence i tell you in the present tense and repeat it to someone else in the past tense, do you? From a conceptual standpoint, that's actually a lot more complicated than subbing ina single non-diatonic note.

You've just practiced it a heck of a lot more.
#13
Quote by HotspurJr
It makes a difference when you're soloing over non-diatonic progressions.

eg, you're in C, but playing a Bb major chord. It helps to be able to switch all your Bs into Bbs in your scale without thinking about it.
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I think it's helpful to learn the notes on the fretboard. I think you can get away with learning the pitches that those notes represent, but having a distinct name for those sounds is pretty useful.
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