#1
Can anyone suggest any books or videos on sequencing scales such as harmonic minor and minor pentatonic?

I have been looking around on the internet, local guitar shop and even went to a book shop and i could find nothing. the closest thing i could find is scales and modes and i don't think that's what i'm looking for.

Thanks in advance!
#2
I'm really not sure what kind of information you're looking for, could you be more specific?
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#3
What i'm looking for is a way to make scales sound interesting instead of up and down. I thought they would be called sequences but obviously not. sorry for so much confusion.
#4
There is no real "way". It's like asking "what way should I use words in order to say interesting things?".


It doesn't work that way. You have ideas in your mind and you say the words you need to express them.

Guitar is this way as well. You hear what you want in your mind, and you play it. The scales help you find it.

Start with a simple song you like, find the key, and play that key scale over it. Try and guess stuff, try things randomly as well. Timing imo is the most important thing. You could make cool music with only 3 notes if you want.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Dec 2, 2014,
#5
I was starting to think that but i just wanted to know if there was something out there to help me. Anyway thanks for your comment. I do appreciate it a lot.
#6
I like to play my scales broken. So instead of playing straight up and down i might go R-3-2-4-3-4-5-6-5-7 or something.

I often pedal too, so i'll pedal the root with the rest of the notes, then pedal the 2 with the rest of the notes, then the 3 and so on.
#7
They are very easy to make up for yourself.

Choose how many notes you want in a sequence pattern (e.g, 3). Suppose this means choosing 3 consecutive scale notes. How many ways can those be ordered?

e.g. lowest, middle, highest. or middle, lowest, highest etc ..

Choose one of these, e.g lowest, middle,highest. Then apply that pattern starting at each scale note in turn. So, 1,2,3, 2,3,4, 3,4,5 etc.

Or if you choose middle, lowest, highest you'd get

2,1,3 3,2,4 4,3,5 etc.

But the above has limited use. Sequences usually aren't used for long periods of time ... they sound too predictable. They don't really get you nearer to improvising musically.

Here's a few suggestions to help you:

One way to think of a scale is as a palette of notes you can use, and the choice of note(s) at any one time can be (doesn't have to be) guided by what a chord progression is doing, and finding suitable landing notes on the chords as they go by (e.g. 3rds and 7ths), and then "filling in" between the landing notes (follow the scale), or adding additional notes in the vicinity of the landing note, or jumping to that landing note up. Look up the use of approach notes, neighbour tones, passing tones.

As your aural skills improve, you'll be able to hear this in your imagination, but till then, you can see these in chord shapes and scale shapes.

However, a great deal of interest comes from phrasing, and it's extremely useful to have a selection of rhythmic patterns you can draw one, when not playing at high speed. Even when literally playing a scale in order, using such patterns can add a lot. Look up syncopation.

Repeated phrases (in terms of rhythm) with different note choice also adds more for the listener to latch on to.

There's also how you dress up a note, mechanically through guitar technique (slides, bends, vibrato ...).

cheers, Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Dec 3, 2014,
#8
I am not aware of any books on this topic, but I am generally not a consumer of guitar books. As previously mentioned, I think a lot of this comes from your own creativity, but there are things that you can do to develop this creativity.

One thing I have used to try to improve my phrasing is (as it was described to me) a "question/answer" technique. You play a sequence of notes that ends on a note other than the root. This sequence is analogous to a question. It builds a little tension and begs the listener to search for resolution. You then follow up with another sequence of notes that resolves to the root. This second sequence is analogous to the answer. You can keep interchanging "question" and "answer" sequences. You can build more tension by repeating "question" sequences before providing the "answer". Experiment with different scale degrees to end the "question" sequences. For me, this got me to think of phrasing a little differently.

Another sequence of notes commonly used in a scale is (as I describe it) a circular scale pattern. In this pattern, you play the first 4 notes of the scale, then jump back three notes, then play the next four notes, then jump back three notes, and repeat. This is a fun way to practice scales, but has many real world applications. To explain it better, here is a tab of this using a G major scale on the low E string...

---3--5--7--3--5--7--8--5--7--8--10--7--8--10--12--8--10--12--14--10--12--14--15--

I hope these ideas were useful!
#9
Do a search on the lessons here for the Hopscotch Method. Following this method you'll be able to build a scalemap deasily covering the whole of the fretboard. And whenever you practice your scales make sure you sing them as you play them because that will train your ear, learn your scales and learn a scale map for each scale. Singing the scales is the most important thing to do though, you'll find yourself being able to play your own solos you hear in your head and being able to play other people's solos in next to no time.
#10
If you want scales to sound interesting instead of up and down you need to start hit notes in the scale in know order , If you want to do scale runs try string skipping .
#12
^^^
This!

Paul Guilbert help me understanding a lot more about transposing the feeling when I play.
Youtube is full of lesson, check em out!
#13
Quote by apbluegrass

One thing I have used to try to improve my phrasing is (as it was described to me) a "question/answer" technique. You play a sequence of notes that ends on a note other than the root. This sequence is analogous to a question. It builds a little tension and begs the listener to search for resolution. You then follow up with another sequence of notes that resolves to the root. This second sequence is analogous to the answer. You can keep interchanging "question" and "answer" sequences. You can build more tension by repeating "question" sequences before providing the "answer". Experiment with different scale degrees to end the "question" sequences. For me, this got me to think of phrasing a little differently.


Yes, there is a LOT of mileage in this. Happens all the time in melodies on songs as well.

The phrase doesn't need to a be a note sequence for this idea (especially in sung melodies), but the critical point is the rhythm used (note placement in time) and repeating that. The latter makes the idea impact more on the listener, and add in the resolution bit, yiou get even more impact.

cheers, Jerry
#14
All these posts are why I asked for more information: there are so many different ways of taking the phrase "scale sequences"

There are answers here that range from general solo construction to the basics of what I would call "sequencing", and yet my answer for sequencing (as I understand the term at least) would be different again...
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Dec 5, 2014,
#15
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
All these posts are why I asked for more information: there are so many different ways of taking the phrase "scale sequences"

There are answers here that range from general solo construction to the basics of what I would call "sequencing", and yet my answer for sequencing (as I understand the term at least) would be different again...

IT's turned out to be a good thing though because everyone with different answers has thrown their own little curve ball in for everyone to try!