#1
I've just got a Yamaha Pacifica PAC012 and a Marshall amp 10 watts(not sure about the model). Now the guitar was tested for me by a friend at the shop - I'm a novice - and it worked well there. Now at home as soon as the guitar is plugged in and the amp is turned on the amp just plays constant static. At zero volume on the guitar there's no noise/static rise up the volume and its there.

At medium volume say 5, the static is annoying but I can hear a little of the strumming - on the fifth position. But the static is bad enough to drone most of it out the guitar.

The internet is undecided between a problem in the cable, the amp and guitar. Some say its caused by trouble in the electrical wiring. Also there is a TV and a computer within 4 feet of the amp and guitar, is that too close? Please help.
#2
The internet isn't undecided, it's that it could be any of those things and there's no way to diagnose every case without individual input. If you can try using a different cable, amp, guitar, and/or outlet, you can help narrow it down. The people at the shop can probably help if you don't have access to extra equipment.
#3
Quote by Roc8995
The internet isn't undecided, it's that it could be any of those things and there's no way to diagnose every case without individual input. If you can try using a different cable, amp, guitar, and/or outlet, you can help narrow it down. The people at the shop can probably help if you don't have access to extra equipment.


Thanks for the prompt reply.

Its just I dont live anywhere near the shop and getting a car(amp and guitar together are rather cumbersome) to travel to one isn't easy for me. I was hoping to at least partly diagnose it. Mainly if it was a good chance of the cable being the culprit I was hoping to just replace it. So is it the likely flaw?
#5
in position 5 you are getting what is called 60 cycle hum. This is normal with strats but easy to fix.. of course this means buying a new pickup for the neck. It's not broken just the way that the pickup buzzes is the way vintage styled single coils are wound.

this is, is simple and goes without notice in a guitar shops because there's always kids sweep picking and all this crap so we don't hear it.

so why does this happen
on a traditional fender strat for example. Boring, horrible out dated guitars like traditional les pauls...but ... on a fender strat we have one pickup and the way copper wire is wound across it is going clockwise , the middle pickup is wound counter clockwise so in reverse and the neck pickup is back to clockwise. By the two pickups working together so positions 2 and 4 it eliminates eachothers hum when they work together. You don't hear this in position 1 because how humbuckers is wound the same way normal and counter clockwise.

so ok what can you do
a hum cancelling neck pickup is option 1 - Dimarzio and seymour duncan make lots that do
option 2 if you are good with soldering is what is called the 7 way mod. You can turn the bridge pickup on in position 5 for a bridge/neck position. Or all 3 pickups on in position 4. It's one of the easier mods you can do.

the only other way you get buzz in a guitar is if a ground wire is going in the wrong place or has been detached. Any guitar questions feel free to send me a private message on here.
#6
Do you get the noise all the time or just when you are handling/playing it? In low humidity environments static charges often build up on the plastic pickguards. If you get more static when you touch or rub the pickguard, try wiping of the pickguard with a sheet of Bounce or other fabric softener dryer sheet.

If that is the problem it means that you probably have very low humidity in your house which can cause drying of the wood, which could lead to fret sprout, finish and wood cracks, and even warping.
#7
Quote by rcazador
Also there is a TV and a computer within 4 feet of the amp and guitar, is that too close?


Find out with this easy experiment: Switch off the TV and the computer.

How is the noise then?