#1
Does anyone know how to better control your fingers when you play? For example, keeping your fingers closer to the fretboard. If I'm playing something, sometimes my pinky or middle finger will just shoot up. I have been working on this for a little while, it has gotten a bit better. I practice things at slow speeds until I have full control over my fingers. Any tips for how I can improve this?
#2
I've been working on this myself for a few days and it's gotten much better.

I've been playing scales and exercises including 'spider' exercises without a metronome, and have been concentrating on being completely relaxed and playing with complete control over my hand.

I play extremely slowly, and not really in time, but concentrating on keeping all fingers close to the board at all times, moving in a relaxed motion and keeping an eye on my muting (movement of the index finger).

I would think it's a slow process to get it up to any sort of speed but i'm definitely noticing an improvement at my current snail's pace.
#3
Slow practicing is always good! However most people have poor left hand technique (assuming you're right handed). I commonly see thumbs over the top of the neck and hands moving out of position! The guitar was designed to fit nicely under your hands and a lot of people make it more complicated than it should be! My advice is; before you play your guitar, drop your left hand by your side, let it completely relax and then turn your forearm so it's facing forwards. This is the way your hand naturally wants to sit on the neck, practice this until it becomes second nature, this should sort out your problem!
#4
Quote by GuitarFlip1
Does anyone know how to better control your fingers when you play? For example, keeping your fingers closer to the fretboard. If I'm playing something, sometimes my pinky or middle finger will just shoot up. I have been working on this for a little while, it has gotten a bit better. I practice things at slow speeds until I have full control over my fingers. Any tips for how I can improve this?



practice like this:
start with 60 bmp whole notes this is really slow. always look at your fingers. at this speed you'll be able to control the reflex of your fingers when they'll want come to far form the fret board.
then go to 80 and 100 bmp whole notes
then 60, 80 100 half notes
then 60 80 100 quarter and 8th notes and then 16th notes.
when it comes to 16th notes, increase tempo by smaller steps 4 or even 2.
#5
Quote by JureGolobic
practice like this:
start with 60 bmp whole notes this is really slow. always look at your fingers. at this speed you'll be able to control the reflex of your fingers when they'll want come to far form the fret board.


I actually advise against purposefully controlling where your fingers are in height by conscious effort. I think that way there's nothing but excess tension as you fight between pulling fingers away from the fretboard and keeping them close.

What I think people should do is try and keep their hands as relaxed as possible at all times. You're going to have to play slowly for this to work, like... slower than can be reasonably measured on a metronome (I think I've seen Freepower call this "no-tempo practice"). Don't worry about playing in time or anything like that. The important thing is that you very slowly work on this: don't lift your fingers. The key thing to realise with this is that the opposite of fretting isn't lifting, it is simply not fretting. What you want to do is, when you're done using a finger to fret, just relax the muscles being used. Don't lift, just relax. You'll find, if you can do this at all, that when you relax your fingers assume a natural position that's almost certain to be really close to the fretboard. Even if they're a bit further away than you might like, being relaxed is more important than being really close to the fretboard.

Now a few words of warning:
1 - This takes a lot of concentration to even do. I've been working it in to my practice when I have the time for a while and I still need to completely focus on my hand to get it to happen properly.
2 - This is not a skill you can practice to a point and say "Ok, I can do that now" and move on. It's something that you do in your practice routine and slowly, over weeks and months and years it filters in to your playing. As I said, I've been doing it for a while and it's still very much not a thing that happens in my normal playing, but I can definitely say that my fretting hand has gotten much more efficient and relaxed since I started.
3 - You still need to concentrate on getting the rest of your playing form right, this is one of the reasons it takes so much thought to get it right. There's a lot to think about and do.

This is hard, no doubt about that, but it's the way to go in my opinion. Better for my money than directly forcing your fingers to stay close to the fretboard.
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#6
Quote by GuitarFlip1
Does anyone know how to better control your fingers when you play? For example, keeping your fingers closer to the fretboard. If I'm playing something, sometimes my pinky or middle finger will just shoot up. I have been working on this for a little while, it has gotten a bit better. I practice things at slow speeds until I have full control over my fingers. Any tips for how I can improve this?

Sounds like you're improving.Keep at it,It takes time.