#1
I have been using a variety of aural training techniques to develop my ear. One thing I do, is sing the notes as I play them to build the relationship between my ear and the fretboard. Another thing I do is transcribe basic songs by ear to help develop the relationship between the melody in my head and the fretboard.

Lastly, I have been using a smart-phone app which quizzes me in the interval between two notes. The app plays two notes and has me identify the interval on a virtual fretboard. So far I have only done ascending intervals but I am having a real hard time learning the Minor 6th, Minor 7th, and Major 7th ascending intervals.

I learned the other intervals using songs that start with the interval. For example, the perfect fifth to me is simply the first two notes of the Star Wars theme song. This technique works well for my brain to build the association. After practice, I have been able to remove the Star Wars theme song from the association, and now I just hear the perfect 5th.

My problem is that I have not found a good songs for me for the Minor 6th, Minor 7th, and Major 7th ascending intervals. Does anyone know any songs that have these intervals in them? I live in the U.S. if that helps, cause it obviously needs to be a song I know in order for it to work.

Otherwise, what is an alternative method for building the association between the interval sound and the name/fret positions if there are no good songs for these intervals?
#2
In my experience, interval training wasn't that worthwhile. I was scoring perfectly on interval-training quizzes and yet it wasn't translating to listening and playing music most of the time.

The thing that made a big difference for me, instead, was the functional ear trainer, a free download at miles.be. I honestly don't remember what songs I used for some of those minor intervals ... I was recognizing them but it wasn't making a difference.
#3
I just regularly practiced around 500 intervals per day with the musictheory.net interval ear training for like half a year. Never used song association. It's important to also sing the intervals.

Nowadays I practice by doing sight singing on sightreadingfactory (website). It generates random, but mostly realistic music. I guess sight singing is the best way, but also the most challenging. I'd say go for sight singing, while also learning to memorize isolated intervals and just singing full solfege scales.
Last edited by Elintasokas at Dec 3, 2014,
#5
Quote by Elintasokas
I just regularly practiced around 500 intervals per day with the musictheory.net interval ear training for like half a year. Never used song association. It's important to also sing the intervals.

Nowadays I practice by doing sight singing on sightreadingfactory (website). It generates random, but mostly realistic music. I guess sight singing is the best way, but also the most challenging. I'd say go for sight singing, while also learning to memorize isolated intervals and just singing full solfege scales.



Hi Elintasokas.
Does any of your software test for accuracy of your singing against score?
cheers, Jerry
#6
Quote by jerrykramskoy
Hi Elintasokas.
Does any of your software test for accuracy of your singing against score?
cheers, Jerry

Nope, there's no input whatsoever. But I don't think that'd be necessary, because I tend to either hit the notes 100% or miss them completely. In other words, I know if and when I screw up. lol.
Last edited by Elintasokas at Dec 3, 2014,