#1
I have a floyd rose equipped guitar and the action is higher on the higher frets and very low on the lower frets, while getting higher and higher as you go up. If I raise the bridg the action is perfect on 1-10 ish frets for bending and vibrato but way too high on the higher frets, if i raise it, the action is too low on the 1-10 frets and hard to do a bench on the high e string.

I was thinking about doing a slight trust rod relief, but not sure if that'll solve it, the neck looks normal as far as i can see.


Are guitars normally supposed to be like this?

or is this action height pretty much the same regardless of fret position?
Last edited by musicandthewave at Dec 5, 2014,
#3
A lot of people have theirs setup like this and a lot of techs I've went to will set up a guitar like this unless you want even action all the way up the neck. Its easier for chording on the low frets and easier to get under a string on the high frets and bend it.
#4
Ideally, the action should be very close to even up and down the neck, but it's usually very slightly higher on the bridge side. Carvin has advertised "action as low as 1/16th" at the 24th fret, with no buzzing frets" and has delivered.

Leave The Truss Rod Alone. It's actually one of the very last things you play with.

First, your frets need to be level. You can check this with a good metal straight edge. If they're not, you won't be able to set your guitar up with low action without buzzing frets. If you have high frets, you'll usually need to have a tech fix that for you.

Second, you need to have the nut properly cut so that the strings are at the correct height. If your nut is cut too high, you'll get buzzing at the higher frets when you try to lower the action. If your nut is cut too low, you'll get buzzing at the lower frets (the ones closest to the nut) when you try to lower the action.

Third, you'll need to have your bridge (and saddle) height set properly. This includes setting up both the nut and the bridge so that the strings to follow the curve of the fretboard (the "radius') and, usually, putting the bass strings just slightly higher than the treble strings.

Currently, you have a nut that's too low. If it's a Floyd locking nut, you can have a tech shim it so that it's slightly higher. That will also allow him to drop the bridge to bring down the action for the higher frets.
#5
Quote by JBailey23
A lot of people have theirs setup like this and a lot of techs I've went to will set up a guitar like this unless you want even action all the way up the neck. Its easier for chording on the low frets and easier to get under a string on the high frets and bend it.


The differences should be slight at best. If you've got medium jumbo or jumbo frets on a guitar, and if those frets are maintained and polished, you should have no issues bending with very low action (well, I don't). If you have high action on the high frets, you'll find it's difficult to move quickly without muting other strings accidentally along the way. You'll be pulling your fingers high off the fretboard, and that's not conducive to working quickly.

You should be able to get by with VERY little relief (truss rod); I set mine using feeler gauges. LEARN the right way to determine what your relief actually is. If someone tells you to put a business card between the string and the fret, you've got someone who probably dials in way too much relief. Mine usually runs between .005 and .010", and at the low end of that range. A business card is WAY too thick. The maximum (if you don't have feeler gauges to check with) rule of thumb is to check it with a NEW playing card (not business). New because they actually get thicker as they're used.
#6
Yea I keep mine super low all the way up. I'm just speaking from experience with all the owners of the "mom & pop" stores around me that laugh at low action and from what they say.
#7
Quote by JBailey23
Yea I keep mine super low all the way up. I'm just speaking from experience with all the owners of the "mom & pop" stores around me that laugh at low action and from what they say.


The local GC seems to have a revolving chair in their little "tech" nook. It's amazing the range that "tech" can encompass, from complete and utter incompetence and nincompoopery to amazing and magical (though the latter rarely appear at a GC unless they're looking for a rest room). I think you get to be the tech if you can figure out how to pick up a soldering iron without inflicting burns on yourself.
#11
Check the relief on the neck by fretting at the 18th fret and the first fret at the same time. You should generally speaking have 2-3 millimeters between the top of the fretwire and the bottom of the low E string at the 7th fret.
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#12
Quote by JBailey23
You can be a salesman at GC if you can play a G chord and say "sweet guitar man" over and over as far as that goes


Pretty much. And if you can tell which guitar has a maple fretboard and which is rosewood, you can be the tech.
#13
Quote by oneblackened
Check the relief on the neck by fretting at the 18th fret and the first fret at the same time. You should generally speaking have 2-3 millimeters between the top of the fretwire and the bottom of the low E string at the 7th fret.


Holy crap no.

Maximum relief might be 0.010". You're calling out 10x - 12x that amount (three millimeters is 0.12", WAY too much). I use between 0.005 and .009"

Rule of thumb -- open a box of NEW playing cards. Pull one out and slide that between the fret and the string. If there's still space under the string, reduce the relief. A business card is too thick. I use feeler gauges.
#14
Quote by Fumble fingers
sounds like it needs a neck shim if its got a bolt-on neck


+1.
#15
Quote by Fumble fingers
sounds like it needs a neck shim if its got a bolt-on neck


+2
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