#1
Hey all!

I am the owner of a Rondo Agile AL-2500 and have been using it for the better part of a decade. Recently, I got to using it and I had no sound! I thought it was my setup at first, and then I thought it was my cable. Neither checked out, so I thought maybe I had a volume issue. I fiddled with the knobs and suddenly got sound again. I thought this was weird but chalked it up to a fluke.

I noticed that my switch was set to treble and I prefer the sound of rhythm so I switched it over. I started playing, and now no sound! I fiddled with the volume again and got a signal back, but now I had a loss of treble again. Over the course of my experiments I found out that depending on which position the controls were in I lose one setting or the other. One of the knobs has a bit of a catch and this seems to determine which tone plays depending on which side of the catch the tone is on. I only either lose treble or rhythm; the middle position of the pickup selector switch always works.

Realtalk: this guitar cost me less than $300 and I have had it for some time. I would rather not buy another one right now given that I have both a decent bass and an amazing Chapman stick coming my way. I have no idea what the issue with the guitar is but repairs cost money. Does anybody know what the issue could potentially be? Is it worth it to get this fixed or should I get another one (preferably a nicer one) given that the repair would cost a good chunk of the base price of my instrument?
#2
Probably your switch or a pot in your guitar. Cheap fix.
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#3
Quote by Frissonista


repairs cost money. Does anybody know what the issue could potentially be? Is it worth it to get this fixed or should I get another one (preferably a nicer one) given that the repair would cost a good chunk of the base price of my instrument?


You've got a pretty decent instrument there. Fix it. Shouldn't be expensive at all (and you should learn to make these kinds of repairs, BTW), and if the rest of the guitar is in good shape, it could last you a very long time.

The base price of your instrument is often immaterial with reference to what you put into it. I have an Agile AL-2000 Floyd B Stock that cost me less than $200. I had its frets superglued and run through a PLEK setup. It's one of my two "bar guitars." And I definitely don't regret the money spent.

I have another guitar that cost me $1160, and that had $1500 worth of additional work done to configure it for a particular project. Another that cost me over $4K (plus the same $1500 worth of additional work) for the same project. It's the $1160 guitar that has become the #1.

The pricetag on your instrument does NOT determine whether you have a better instrument or not -- it only determines what you pay for it.
#4
Quote by Frissonista
I have both a decent bass and an amazing Chapman stick coming my way.


Have you played a Chapman Stick before? Or is this an upcoming experiment? Which model did you end up with?
#5
if you like the acoustic tone of it I'd fix it. Youtube can show you how to do it. More the less with wiring it's finding a loose wire and re-soldering it.

the input jack can be the reason. See if there is two connections
the next I'd look at the volume knob. (seymour duncan wiring diagram will help)

and then finally the selector there should be one wire going to ground and one going to the hot lead which changes in les paul diagrams compared to say an Agile inceptor.
#6
It's an easy fix most likely. Start by spraying the switch down with contact cleaner - I recommend DeOxit D5 - that stuff is amazing - and then switch it back and forth for a minute or two.

If that doesn't fix it then reference the Seymour Duncan site and check for any loose wires or broken solder joints.

Worst case it's not hard to completely resolder everything. . . .
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#7
Hey everybody. Thanks for the feedback! I have always been a bit nervous when it comes to fiddling around with my own instruments but I suppose this is innocuous enough for me to try. I'm not exactly trying to fix the soundpost on my acoustic violin, after all. I am really glad that repairing my guitar makes sense economically! I do like the instrument and want to keep using it for as long as possible. I don't even know how to solder at all. Hey, if I learned to play Bach concertos then I can learn to solder too!

Have you played a Chapman Stick before? Or is this an upcoming experiment? Which model did you end up with?


This is an upcoming experiment but it is one that I have been looking forward to for about a year and a half. That was even before ordering my instrument in August and it is about a week or so from being ready for shipment. I will be jamming out on a standard tuning padauk 12-string grand soon. I have been waiting for this moment ever since seeing Tony Levin in a video on YouTube for the first time. I remember seeing that instrument and hearing it and thinking, "woah, I need to get one of these."
#8
I agree with metalmingee, try contact cleaner first. That's the most likely problem, dirty pots or switch.

If you need to solder it's not hard. If you know how. Get some smallish wire and do some practicing...

1. Let the soldering iron heat up. You want at least a 25 watt, I like a 30 watt.

2. Get some resin flux. NEVER use acid flux on electronics, it WILL cause rust. I found out the hard way...

3. Coat the hot iron tip with flux and melt some solder onto it. Wipe it off on a wet paper towel or natural sponge.

4. Coat both wires with a little flux. It doesn't take much.

5. Melt a small blob of solder onto the iron tip.

6. Touch it to one wire, soon as you see it flow solder onto the wire remove the iron. This is called tinning.

7. Once both wires are tinned, put them together, (clean the iron tip each time it's used on wet paper towel or sponge) then melt a small blob of solder onto the iron and touch it to both wires at once, same as tinning. Soon as it flows onto the wires you're done.

If your solder joint is silver and shiny, it's good, If it's dull gray, you have a "cold" solder joint that will never last, do it again.

Once you can do it right every time on practice wires, dig onto your guitar. Do it quick, it should only take a couple of seconds for bare wires or the contacts on the pots, the last thing you want to do is overheat things. Once you do get a pot, switch or wires hot, let it cool before trying again. Even if you get a good solder joint, let it cool before doing another contact.

Always remember to work quick and clean the tip after every time you use it. Plain tap water on a paper towel works fine, a natural sponge is best. Never use an artificial sponge, the heat will melt it. I use the thinnest solder I can find, and paste flux, I've never had good results with flux core solder. Even when I do use flux core, I still use my paste flux.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...