#1
Hey,

I'm pretty used to writing prog rock type stuff, but I'm really interested in getting into classical composition, but I find it quite hard to articulate ideas very well and such. I can come up with melodies easily enough, but I seem to run into the sand fairly quickly. I listen to a fair amount of classical music, though mainly romantic and impressionist stuff - Debussy, Erik Satie, Rachmaninov, etc. I'm well-grounded in theory and to an extent, Bach harmony, but I just tend to struggle in writing. Typically I try to keep my scope small, on violin duets and string quartets.

Have you guys got any suggestions on good books and such for classical composition? Or else any advice on a starting point instead of barreling through and hoping?

Cheers in advance
Rotten Playground
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#4
Quote by Elintasokas
The Study of Orchestration – Samuel Adler

Why?

Quote by Harmosis
You need to understand form - get a book on form & analysis.

I tend to agree with this. If you actually do know harmony and counterpoint then really the only difference between exercises in that and actual pieces is form. The standard classical concept of how to build phrases, then stringing together phrases to create periods and stringing periods together that have thematic content creates themes.

In a way, Schoenberg's Fundamentals of Musical Composition could be really useful for you.
#5
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Why?

He said he's keeping his scope small (instrumentation wise). If he wants to expand, studying orchestration would most likely be useful.
Last edited by Elintasokas at Dec 5, 2014,
#8
Noice.

TS, learning about form lets you stick your ideas onto a structure when you're first starting out. Then you try to reduce the structures into 'principles' of familiarity/digression/cohesion/variety so you can get more free-form when you're writing.

(which is easier said than done)

I really need to get back into composing.
#9
Quote by Elintasokas
He said he's keeping his scope small (instrumentation wise). If he wants to expand, studying orchestration would most likely be useful.

I'm keeping my scope small because I imagine it's easier to write for maybe 2 or 4 instruments than 10 That and I have a much better idea at the minute of how to work with strings than wind and brass, but that's a bridge to cross once I'm a bit more comfortable where I am.

Judging by all said, looks like study of form is a good start. Not to say I'm a master at the rest by any standard, but I imagine that's the current weak link in the chain. Thanks for all the advice everyone, it's much appreciated

Edit: I've ordered Form in Music and Fundamentals of Music Composition. The Study of Orchestration looks a bit pricier, so I'll hold off for now on that. I don't plan on blasting through the two I've ordered, more likely I'll just focus on one and slowly work through the other when I get around to it - they both sound like worthwhile reads. Cheers again!
Rotten Playground
Listen to me and Jameh muck about on a podcast
as if you have anything better to do.


Quote by Reverend_Taco
Grass stains on my dicks

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Pfft. Gay? Nah, gay is the manliest sex that exists.
Last edited by HeretiK538 at Dec 6, 2014,