#1
Hello,
I am close to purchasing a Two Notes Torpedo live load box for my home recordings. My question is this - The Loadbox has a power input of 100w RMS. My Bugera 6262 is 120 Watts. I was wondering if this would be okay? I am not sure if they are rating the bugera 6262 at it's RMS rating or max output rating.

Has anyone else used a 120W amp with a Two Notes Torpedo Live? I'm guessing it is okay, but I'd like to be sure. Thanks.
#2
Taken from this website: http://www.musicplayers.com/reviews/guitars/2013/1013_Torpedo_Live.php
The input is rated for 100 Watts at 8Ω, so be careful if you’ve got a 120W amp or speakers wired differently. You don’t want to mismatch power and ohms when using a loadbox, so treat these specs as a requirement more than a guide.[Editor’s Note: The Torpedo VB-101 offers an 150W load]
So you should either buy that VB-101 model, or pull your two outer tubes so your amp runs in 60 watts and use an 8 ohm out. Somebody else should confirm this thpugh before you take my advice
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#3
As long as you don't crank your volume control you'll be fine, generally speaking. Keep it below half and you'll have no issues.
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#4
Quote by oneblackened
As long as you don't crank your volume control you'll be fine, generally speaking. Keep it below half and you'll have no issues.

+1

i have used a couple 120+ watt amps with my torpedo, i just don't crank them to max. generally there is little need to crank your amp to max anyway, it usually sounds pretty bad.
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#5
Well, in my bedroom, I never crank it past 2. The tubes come alive their, and any higher it bleeds on my ears. So the volume level is proportionate to the amount of wattage being pushed? I appreciate the replies!
#6
Quote by Watterboy
You don’t want to mismatch power and ohms when using a loadbox
It really isn't any different from when you're using a cab.
Quote by jnr1114
Well, in my bedroom, I never crank it past 2. The tubes come alive their
It really isn't a matter of tubes there, it's a matter of heavy speakers designed to move lotsa air and the fletcher munson curves.

Disregard it when people tell you tube amps sound better at higher volumes 'cause tubes work better at higher volumes and stuff.
Quote by jnr1114
So the volume level is proportionate to the amount of wattage being pushed?
Yep.

Also what you call wattage is called power.
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#7
Quote by Spambot_2
It really isn't any different from when you're using a cab.
It really isn't a matter of tubes there, it's a matter of heavy speakers designed to move lotsa air and the fletcher munson curves.

Disregard it when people tell you tube amps sound better at higher volumes 'cause tubes work better at higher volumes and stuff.


So you're saying, you're tube tone doesn't technically change upon increase of volume? It's the level of noise coming from your speakers that change the tone? I've seen comparisons of low vs high volume tube amps running through attenuators and higher volume on the tubes is always better than low.


Quote by Spambot_2
Also what you call wattage is called power.


Yes, I know what wattage is. Haha
#8
Quote by jnr1114
So you're saying, you're tube tone doesn't technically change upon increase of volume? It's the level of noise coming from your speakers that change the tone? I've seen comparisons of low vs high volume tube amps running through attenuators and higher volume on the tubes is always better than low.


well, 'tube tone' is an imprecise phrase that comes with a bunch of subjective baggage. whether your equipment uses tubes, transistors or opamps for amplification there is a way these components respond when driven at different levels.

from what i have seen/read it seems these components react quite similarly when operating within their 'linear' operational ranges (this would be when the amps are 'clean' sounding). these circuits sound quite different when pushed outside of their linear response ranges, and these differences in sound are related to not just component choice but the sound is also related to the circuit designs.

this is just what i have gleaned from this heavily controversial topic.

if the idea of 'tube tone' is classic rock then it has a bit to do with a non-master volume tube amp being cranked near max (ala a marshall plexi style rock tone) then much of that tone has to do with the preamp, power amp and speakers all being pushed near or at the operational limits. sometimes an overdrive pedal is incorporated to make a bit more distortion and to change a bit of the character of the sound, this started to become popular during the late 70's and early 80's.

this idea of 'tube tone' changes drastically when you deal with modern rock/metal tones, these tones seem to generally deal mostly with preamp distortion. modern metal tones usually drive the preamp pretty hard and don't want the power amp to distort at all and these setups tend to have speakers that respond pretty linearly (don't distort).

you'll notice both the classic rock and modern metal examples both can be considered 'tube tones', but are achieved quite differently.

but there is all types of responses that change the sound coming from the amp (circuit response) and what you hear (equivalence curves like Fletcher-Munson and A-weight curves).
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Last edited by gumbilicious at Dec 6, 2014,