#2
Learn a six string first, just to get the basics.
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#3
It's more about lower lows. That said, if you don't know 6-string yet, then you have no business bothering with a 7 or 8 string.
#4
Lower lows, more range and options in general. A lot of my favorite bands used 7s and that's why I switched.
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#5
Just say **** it and start on an 8 string
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#6
Quote by pointnplink
Is this for higher highs, and lower lows? Should I learn 6 string first?


Yes.

Yes.
#7
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
It's more about lower lows. That said, if you don't know 6-string yet, then you have no business bothering with a 7 or 8 string.


Rubbish.

If he hasn't started learning, then having a seven string as a first guitar, or an early upgrade, is goingo d no harm whatsoever. He has little to no frame of reference, or muscle memory. I say the exact same thing about people starting on five string basses. It's only a extra string, there is no 'levelling up' to a 7 string, no rite of passage that means you must become good on a sixer first. Hell, as all the learning material uses six string examples, his theory knowledge could improve faster because he'd be forced to apply thoe examples onto the seventh string, and that is far from being a bad thing.

TS, if you want to go fo a seven, just go for it.
#8
^ Well, you do have a point, although the problem is, starting on a 7 or 8-string makes things difficult. When you're a beginner, 6 strings feels like A LOT, and more is even more confusing. Also, finding actual beginner-level songs (which I still think is by far the best way to learn to play an instrument) for a 7 or especially 8-string is pretty much impossible except for pure 00000000000 stuff which doesn't teach anything.

Personally I started on 6-string acoustic and went straight for 7-string electric and I regret nothing. It feels like kind of "best of both worlds to me", because I got pretty familiar with most basic things on the acoustic already, but the early transition made learning 7-string pretty easy. But I wouldn't recommend diving straight to a 7-string guitar, it's going to be ultra confusing.
#9
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
It's more about lower lows. That said, if you don't know 6-string yet, then you have no business bothering with a 7 or 8 string.


This is crap I wouldn't bother with an 8 string as there's next to no songs that'll actually need one to be played but if you want a 7 then go for it.
That being said I wouldn't get one just for the hell of it. If you like a lot of baritone tuned music then its useful but other than that just get a 6
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#10
Quote by TheLiberation
^ Well, you do have a point, although the problem is, starting on a 7 or 8-string makes things difficult. When you're a beginner, 6 strings feels like A LOT, and more is even more confusing. Also, finding actual beginner-level songs (which I still think is by far the best way to learn to play an instrument) for a 7 or especially 8-string is pretty much impossible except for pure 00000000000 stuff which doesn't teach anything.


I'm pretty sure that you can play almost anything that is possible on a 6 string, on a 7 string. You are allowed to neglect some strings.

As a matter of fact, most beginner attempts are just ultra simplified melodies. There's no reason he couldn't do that on an extended range guitar.
#11
Yeah I know, but the "omg confusion what do I do with all this" factor is pretty large at the beginning, and it really takes a longer while until you stop getting lost among the strings and move between them intuitively. It's going to be only harder on a 7 string.

I'm not saying you can't start on a 7-string or even 8-string, but I think it's just not a good idea as it's going to make learning significantly harder at the beginning, and the time required to actually learn to properly use the extended range is usually long enough to wrap your head around a 6-string and then save for a 7.

Also, of course you can play 6-string songs on a 7 or 8, but the feel is very different and depending on the song, can make things a little or a lot harder. Somehow I have trouble imagining a beginner managing to precisely pick riffs on the 6th string while muting and not accidentally picking the 7th or 8th strings.
#12
Quote by megano28
I'm pretty sure that you can play almost anything that is possible on a 6 string, on a 7 string. You are allowed to neglect some strings.

Ding ding ding.

My sevens are just six string electrics that have an extra low string, when I want it.

My AW-7 is normally tuned to ADGCFAD. Drop C? I'll just drop that D. It is definitely possible to ignore a string. It's not in the way.
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#13
Quote by TheLiberation
Also, of course you can play 6-string songs on a 7 or 8, but the feel is very different and depending on the song, can make things a little or a lot harder. Somehow I have trouble imagining a beginner managing to precisely pick riffs on the 6th string while muting and not accidentally picking the 7th or 8th strings.


It's a bit uncomfortable, at best.

Anything you'd learn that involved that much finesse on the 6th string wouldn't be a problem for a beginner. The only real issue is could see would be from a player considering 7 strings his/her default, and find it hard to go back down to 6. That could be fixed with a mental note in the beginning.

It's sounds like you're massively overestimating the addition of a string that's normally tuned to the pitch of one of the original 6.
#14
Well, I just remember my own beginnings, and I also remember the two times I had an 8-string in my hand and was looking for the A string at at least one point while not exactly being that much of a beginner anymore.

As I said, it's not impossible and it's not ridiculously hard, but it's simply not something I'd recommend. It becomes an additional difficulty at the beginning, and by the time it stops being a difficulty you can probably save enough to get a second guitar.

Plus there's also the most important issue which we somehow missed, which is if you even need an extended range guitar - I knew what I was going for and why I picked a 7-string but that's because, well, I already had a pretty decent idea about guitars, tunings and such in the first place. I'm not sure how someone who doesn't really know how to play guitar can make a conscious choice if they need a 7 or 8-string if they don't know what notes to tune their guitar to.
#15
If anything, you had that difficulty because of the fact that you waited to try an 8 string. Just like a pianist doesn't have to look down at his hands when he plays, or you don't exactly count the strings to find your D, the more time you have to acclimate, the less likely those errors will occur. A beginner is going to look for his A either way. It's all new to them.

And you buy your first instrument, at least many do, with the intention of emulating a player or band. That's why there's a large array of instruments in the beginner level. If this person wanted to start playing, and considered themselves a Meshuggah fan, then an 8 string becomes almost a necessity. In this case, it would be more economical to just purchase the 8 string, rather than to make two separate buys.

I stick to you making it a bigger deal than it is. If the number of strings was that intimidating of a factor, then the bass would suddenly become massively more attractive. Not to mention the consistent interval, between the strings. The fact that he's considering an extended range instrument to begin with already hints at the musical preference. It's not that hard to put together.
#16
You can learn to play 6 strings on a 7 string lol.

The only difference is EADGBE vs. BEADGBE. Just ignore that top B string. It doesn't limit you in any way by being there.

Going even further on an 8 string you'll just ignore two strings rather than one.

And to the guy that said people have no business playing any more than 6 unless you can play 6... when can you determine that they can play 6 and are "allowed" to move on to 7 and 8? You can't. Sorry but that statement is a bunch of BS.
#17
Quote by TheLiberation
Yeah I know, but the "omg confusion what do I do with all this" factor is pretty large at the beginning, and it really takes a longer while until you stop getting lost among the strings and move between them intuitively. It's going to be only harder on a 7 string.

I'm not saying you can't start on a 7-string or even 8-string, but I think it's just not a good idea as it's going to make learning significantly harder at the beginning, and the time required to actually learn to properly use the extended range is usually long enough to wrap your head around a 6-string and then save for a 7.

Also, of course you can play 6-string songs on a 7 or 8, but the feel is very different and depending on the song, can make things a little or a lot harder. Somehow I have trouble imagining a beginner managing to precisely pick riffs on the 6th string while muting and not accidentally picking the 7th or 8th strings.


As I said, you have no frame of reference when you're starting. You're going to have to learn to mute the string anyway, just as you would learn to mute the E when playing the A string. It's not really adding anything difficulty wise.
#18
Still, that's more to mute (and I guess in 90% of cases this is going to concern playing with heavy distortion, so if you don't mute right it's going to be a total mess), and no frame of reference doesn't help as that's simply more to take in and learn. It's bound to take more time learning your way around the middle strings.

Also, as for musical preference/band emulation, a) I doubt there's many people out there who listen to a majority of ERG bands as simply they're still an obvious minority, b) most bands that use them take a very decent amount of skill to play their stuff. Again, unless we go for the 0000000 bands, but I don't think these are very inspiring.

But I don't think we're going anywhere with this - that's just my opinion and I think there are a couple of factors to take into account when considering this. They're not impossibly huge difficulties, but they simply cannot be ignored. Learning guitar can be intimidating at first as it is, adding more strings if you don't even know if you need them will not help.
#19
Was palm muting that much of a challenge to you? Did it take that much effort to learn on 6 strings for you? Most importantly, are you also muting every single string that you're not playing while you mute? There isn't 'more' strings to mute, as you're only concerned with the strings in range. It's a non-issue.

a) To even ask about them says that they were brought up somewhere while looking. No one is saying everyone should start with an ERG, so this is also a point with no base. It only applies to those with an interest with Djent and other 7-8 string music and related interest. B) there are many bands with skill, that beginners would try to emulate. It's okay to use bands that are better as motivation. Unless, anyone who plays a 6 string is only allowed to like them because of really crappy powerchord-punk.

And no one said there wouldn't be any adjusting. Just that it's not as big of a deal as you're making it.
#20
Quote by lemurflames
Ding ding ding.

My sevens are just six string electrics that have an extra low string, when I want it.

My AW-7 is normally tuned to ADGCFAD. Drop C? I'll just drop that D. It is definitely possible to ignore a string. It's not in the way.



+2. On many occasions I've thought about getting a 7-string just because I occasionally like to write/play songs in B. But I don't necessarily want my 6-string guitar setup for B-Standard -- that's too low for a lot of what I play. 7-8 string guitars are all about versatility.
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#21
Quote by TheLiberation
Still, that's more to mute (and I guess in 90% of cases this is going to concern playing with heavy distortion, so if you don't mute right it's going to be a total mess), and no frame of reference doesn't help as that's simply more to take in and learn. It's bound to take more time learning your way around the middle strings.

Also, as for musical preference/band emulation, a) I doubt there's many people out there who listen to a majority of ERG bands as simply they're still an obvious minority, b) most bands that use them take a very decent amount of skill to play their stuff. Again, unless we go for the 0000000 bands, but I don't think these are very inspiring.

But I don't think we're going anywhere with this - that's just my opinion and I think there are a couple of factors to take into account when considering this. They're not impossibly huge difficulties, but they simply cannot be ignored. Learning guitar can be intimidating at first as it is, adding more strings if you don't even know if you need them will not help.


They can be ignored. The beginner will ignore the 'difficulties' because they know no different and don't know of these 'difficulties.' As an analogy, the longer serving staff at work take longer to adopt new procedures because the old ones are ingrained. Our new starters are effectively sponges and take new procedures on much easier because they know no different amd haven't had the time to build up the familiarity, bad habits etc.