#1
I've been playing for around a year now on a Squier strat. With my hands, it is difficult to get around the fretboard at times, but I see these little kids and women (who may have small hands) like Nita Strauss and Courtney Cox on YT shredding with ease. So are there some fast Ibanez necks more comfortable than others?
#2
they have a different radius and scale, making possible bigger bending, jumbo frets for less pressure needed, FR usually etc. So yeah, better than a squire if you want to shred

as for hand size, the neck may be thinner and more comfortable, but the scale is actually bigger to get 24 frets
Last edited by Tempoe at Dec 6, 2014,
#3
Quote by Tempoe
they have a different radius and scale, making possible bigger bending, jumbo frets for less pressure needed, FR usually etc. So yeah, better than a squire if you want to shred

as for hand size, the neck may be thinner and more comfortable, but the scale is actually bigger to get 24 frets

Might there be any of the wizard necks that's more comfortable than the other wizard necks?
#4
You'd have to try them out yourself, I don't know what's comfortable to you. I really like them, mine is a RG1570
#5
Go try them out for yourself.
I have found that a guitar that is "comfortable" to play is the guitar that is best for shredding.
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#6
Quote by pointnplink
Might there be any of the wizard necks that's more comfortable than the other wizard necks?

I have to weigh in on this, yes. check this out http://www.jemsite.com/forums/f16/ibanez-neck-shapes-ie-wizard-i-ii-iii-131220.html

I had a RGR421EXFM that I had to get rid of because it hurt my wrist, wizard II which is fairly wide and super flat. but the original wizard has a little more curve at least to me, much better. Had a Ibby sas32ex at one point as well and it's neck was pretty good, much curvier than rg, didn't like the finish on it though.

I would recommend though, the rgr421 like I had or a similar guitar for your budget if it feels right to you. If you can find an original wizard or afford a prestige, go for that. My left thumb only bends backwards, like hitch-hiker only it doesn't go forward so the wizard II's hurt my wrist personally. it was a great guitar though.

I also think Jacksons and ESP/LTDs have better feeling necks than most Ibanez, but that's preference.
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Last edited by JagerSlushy at Dec 6, 2014,
#7
Quote by pointnplink
I've been playing for around a year now on a Squier strat. With my hands, it is difficult to get around the fretboard at times, but I see these little kids and women (who may have small hands) like Nita Strauss and Courtney Cox on YT shredding with ease. So are there some fast Ibanez necks more comfortable than others?


you may just need a good setup on your current guitar. while things like a flatter fretboard radius and thin necks may help some the bottom line is practice. finger and picking efficiency will get you farther on damn near any guitar.
#8
It all comes down to actually playing different models at the store, true, but difficult to play several w/ an aggressive salesperson hovering over your head.
#9
Quote by pointnplink
It all comes down to actually playing different models at the store, true, but difficult to play several w/ an aggressive salesperson hovering over your head.

Well, that can also be to your advantage. Ask them what they have in the store that fits what your looking to get out of a guitar. Some salespeople are actually very helpful especially in circumstances like yours.

have them set you up on a decent amp and get you guitars to try out. Trust me, even a pushy salesperson will do that with the potential of making a sale.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#10
Quote by Tempoe
they have a different radius and scale, making possible bigger bending, jumbo frets for less pressure needed, FR usually etc. So yeah, better than a squire if you want to shred

as for hand size, the neck may be thinner and more comfortable, but the scale is actually bigger to get 24 frets


No need for a bigger scale to get a 24-fret guitar. You can do that on any scale guitar in the design phase.

For example, a Les Paul is generally NOT considered a shredder guitar. Most Gibsons have a nominal 12" radius (though many measure out at something closer to 10"), medium frets, a 22-fret board (with the 22nd at about the same level as the bottom of the cutaway) and a clunky neck heel that has a 90 degree body corner designed to nail you in the palm of your fretting hand when you get up toward the 16th fret. Most Gibson LP aficionados shudder at the thought of a trem on the guitars, and some of the most cherished necks are baseball bats.

The under-$300 Agile AL-2000 Floyd changes that game. It has the same 24.75" scale (by the way, this is shorter than the OP's Squier, and may be easier for smaller hands) as a standard LP. But Agile has extended the neck and moved both the bridge and the bridge pickup about 3/4" toward the neck pickup. This preserves the scale length, but leaves room for two more frets. So the guitar has a 24-fret board with the 24th fret where the 22nd is on a standard model. Instead of a 12" radius, it's 14", frets are jumbo, there's a Floyd on the guitar and (this is the best part) the neck heel is "tilted." In practice, this works as well as the Gibson Axcess sculpted neck heel, and gives you a guitar that's extremely comfortable to play high up. One more subtle detail; the stubby cutaway horn is actually far better than the prettier one on the Gibson, because it doesn't crowd your hand as the Gibson one can, and you can access the upper frets without rotating your hand to get there.

Subtle changes, an inexpensive guitar and one that makes serious shredding a lot more comfortable.