#1
Whenever I start learning something, usually solos, I'll be going along pretty good and then I'll start to almost get worse at what I'm playing. My fingers will just like stop being able to find the notes. As you can imagine it's frustrating. Any help is appreciated!
#2
It's usually either of two, and often both. One is focus, the other is self-criticism. Amusingly, both are a good thing.

It means (usually) that you're enough at ease with the music that your attention can linger, which has very much to do with nerves, if you're comfortable enough that your focus can drift off there is little wrong with it.I t simply implies your subconscious won't do the work for you anymore, but since the muscle memory is not entirely there yet, you'll still have to put in the effort. (If you find this lack of focus happens for several years after learning and mastering this piece, and despite playing it several times a week, see a doctor.)

As for self-criticism, this is something so hated but ever so useful. If you did not have it, you would think yourself a virtuoso, but would be the most dreaded sound of town. At some point in your life it will generally grow faster than your level of skill, apparently for you it is now. So while you will not be playing worse, it will 'sound' worse because you can now actually hear what you're doing wrong. There is nothing wrong with this, it will help you learn how to play better.

As a last note, if there are recurring technical problems, single them out and play them using different rhythmical approaches. Shuffle, backwards shuffle(short-long), thirds, fifths, and so on. This will train your left hand to be in time and precise, and show you where the difficulty comes from.
Wise Man Says: The guitar is obviously female, she's got hips, breasts... and a hole.
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#3
Quote by FretboardToAsh
It's usually either of two, and often both. One is focus, the other is self-criticism. Amusingly, both are a good thing.

It means (usually) that you're enough at ease with the music that your attention can linger, which has very much to do with nerves, if you're comfortable enough that your focus can drift off there is little wrong with it.I t simply implies your subconscious won't do the work for you anymore, but since the muscle memory is not entirely there yet, you'll still have to put in the effort. (If you find this lack of focus happens for several years after learning and mastering this piece, and despite playing it several times a week, see a doctor.)

As for self-criticism, this is something so hated but ever so useful. If you did not have it, you would think yourself a virtuoso, but would be the most dreaded sound of town. At some point in your life it will generally grow faster than your level of skill, apparently for you it is now. So while you will not be playing worse, it will 'sound' worse because you can now actually hear what you're doing wrong. There is nothing wrong with this, it will help you learn how to play better.

As a last note, if there are recurring technical problems, single them out and play them using different rhythmical approaches. Shuffle, backwards shuffle(short-long), thirds, fifths, and so on. This will train your left hand to be in time and precise, and show you where the difficulty comes from.

This was very insightful! Thank you!