#1
Hello everyone I am posting this thread here and not on somewhere to do more with singing because it's mostly a guitar players dilemma(maybe I'll post somewhere asking vocalists for their opinion as well). I had my first voice lesson today and when I asked the teacher what sort of range he would put me in he said he would put me under the bass category. Thing is I always tried singing way higher-at the edge of my range-because I didn't want to use the lower end of my range(what I realized is my natural range-don't ask me why).

So the problem is when I played johnny cash's version of hurt on a guitar tuned a step down(D standard) I found it much easier to sustain a note and more comfortable to sing. Should I tune to d standard all the time? It would make playing with my band a little bit harder but if it's maybe a good idea then I'll try, and I'm not sure if I like the idea of just tuning some guitars down because then i'll have to carry two to practice and also I won't automatically start adjusting for the step difference. Can the amp handle the extra low end well?(I play a mustang iii) Thanks for any help and sorry for the long question.
#2
People change tunings for vocal comfort all the time. Most older bands now (Metallica comes to mind) have tuned their guitars down a half or whole step to accommodate singing. No biggie.
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#3
Yeah but I doubt the other guitar player will want to tune to d standard, and he sings more than I do(I am really just starting to sing), so I can't really tell him to suck it up cause he's the main singer.
#5
Tell the other guitar player to try it out. He may even find that it's easier to sing. Are you currently playing in E? I know when I was in a band we just played all standard E tuned cover songs in Eb and left the Eb songs in Eb. It was easier on our singer, and me too of course because I didn't need to bring more than one guitar with me.

Like mentioned, Metallica now plays in Eb rather than E. Megadeth also changed to play in D standard recently and Mustaine sounds a whole lot better because of the fact.

If your band is too close minded about it you maybe should find more experimental people to play with... Suggestions by bandmates should always be welcomed... and encouraged as a matter of fact.
#7
Quote by PSimonR
There will be no issue for the amp btw.

^

It'll only be an issue in certain circumstances. If it doesn't suck for E standard, it's not going to suck for D standard.
#8
Simply downtuning your guitar isn't necessarily the key (no pun intended). I've only done that when I've learned the song in one key (and worked, perhaps, with a singer who learned it in that key as well), and then needed to downtune because I didn't want to have to relearn a difficult solo, etc.

But some singers only have one or two songs that require that. Often I'll take the time to transpose the song into the new key. That's been a requirement when I've played keyboards in the past (though new keyboards will often allow the flip of a switch to transpose for you).

The Variax guitars have made me lazy, however. I can have a singer walk in, grumble that he can't hit the high notes in some Steve Perry song, and I can simply rotate a dial on the guitar, play the song the way I've always played it, and what comes out of the amp is a step or two (or more) down. These days I can't imagine not having at least one of these guitars in the arsenal.
#9
There seems to be a very big shortage of tenors now a days in rock n' roll....as a tenor I can tell you if you can't hit yet, work your way up to it. Not a lot of people can hit a high B or high C easily without putting in some serious work, ask your vocal teacher, he'll tell ya. As far as retuning the guitar, go for it, there's no shame in downtuning as long as you dont play the song badly...or get a JTV or that Peavey that can change tunings lol.
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#11
Stretching your strings a little and retuned intonation should help, try hanging up the piece and getting it to look as best it can; work on it for that look and sound. I can only imagine it takes a lot of practice.
#12
Quote by Evecin
Stretching your strings a little and retuned intonation should help, try hanging up the piece and getting it to look as best it can; work on it for that look and sound. I can only imagine it takes a lot of practice.


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