#1
I met this chick last night that offered me a bunch of mics and other gear. I don't exactly need this stuff right at the moment but I am in the process of starting my own band in the near future so if I can get a good deal on gear I wanna take my chance.



Heres whats listed is any of this stuff good

4- Apex 750 mics
1- Apex 380 mics
1- Apex 830 mic
6-10 ft mic cords
3-20 ft mic cords
DB box
patch cords
various adaptors
an 8 output DOD profesional mixer board (its old)

For anyone who knows what their talking about is this a good deal for $200-$300
Jackson DK2
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#3
Can you, by any chance, get the mixer and the various adapters and the patch cords and the mic cords without the mics?

'cause in that case it'd be a good deal.
The mics are not much good though.
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#4
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The mics are not much good though.


The rest is not much good either
That aged desk is probably $30 tops...

http://www.interstatemusic.com/30669-Apex-750-Microphone-APEX750.aspx

The Apex 750 is $50 new so put it at about $20 used for each...etc...
I don't think $200 is a bad deal for a starter kit, but run these prices through Ebay.
#5
Yeah, the mic's are not that great (but they will work for getting a band rolling). If you can get it for $200 then go for it
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#6
No. Sorry.

My personal feeling is that if you're going to buy gear for a band, you need at least a 16-hole mixer (and not one of those 8-channel plus four stereo channel things). My rule of thumb is at least five for the drums, at least one each for guitars, bass, probably one or two for keyboards and four or five for vocal mikes.

Vocal mikes in particular should be purchased, owned, and replaced by the individual using them and don't you dare hang some garlic, spit and sweat-riddled green-coated mike from one of those other guys in front of me.

Things are changing, of course, and the guitar players using modelers now want TWO channels for stereo output. Ditto the bass player. I've seen keyboard players ask for their own personal snake, and more of them now have their OWN mixers (drummers, too, especially those with electronic pads in addition to the miked-up stuff) and their own foldback monitors. The good news is that when that happens, they'll have pared the output down to two channels, but your sound guy has lost control of their personal mix.

And modern boards are now coming with a lot more output channels because more and more folks want their own mix.

You'll find a LOT of PA gear available on the various sale sites; it's difficult to get rid of and storing it can get expensive and annoying. Buyers are usually in the driver's seat when it comes to bargaining for this stuff.
#7
Quote by dspellman
No. Sorry.

My personal feeling is that if you're going to buy gear for a band, you need at least a 16-hole mixer (and not one of those 8-channel plus four stereo channel things). My rule of thumb is at least five for the drums, at least one each for guitars, bass, probably one or two for keyboards and four or five for vocal mikes.

Vocal mikes in particular should be purchased, owned, and replaced by the individual using them and don't you dare hang some garlic, spit and sweat-riddled green-coated mike from one of those other guys in front of me.

Things are changing, of course, and the guitar players using modelers now want TWO channels for stereo output. Ditto the bass player. I've seen keyboard players ask for their own personal snake, and more of them now have their OWN mixers (drummers, too, especially those with electronic pads in addition to the miked-up stuff) and their own foldback monitors. The good news is that when that happens, they'll have pared the output down to two channels, but your sound guy has lost control of their personal mix.

And modern boards are now coming with a lot more output channels because more and more folks want their own mix.

You'll find a LOT of PA gear available on the various sale sites; it's difficult to get rid of and storing it can get expensive and annoying. Buyers are usually in the driver's seat when it comes to bargaining for this stuff.

While there is good information here, I completely disagree with your position here.

I highly doubt they want everything in the mixer. Not everyone needs a 16 CH XLR input mixer. They need something to make noise for practice and possibly a small gig that will work fine for that, although it is not the best gear
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#8
Id pass personally. All low end stuff that really isn't worth the trouble. Honestly, the only thing of value I see on that list are the XLR cables, but we don't know if they're any good, either.

A $100 Behringer board will have more features and be just as reliable as that one wil . You still have to buy a power amp and speakers (or powered speakers), to do anything with the setup. Unless you have several singers or you're planning to play large venues without a supplied PA, you won't really need to run more than vocals and the kick drum through the PA at practices or small gigs.
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#9
Nah, Derek, the sliders **** up on the Behringer desks. They fill up full of filth and corruption very quickly and fail. You're comparing dog shit and cat shit there. Neither are any good on your sandwich.
I'd agree though, find some cheap powered bins of a decent brand and a small mixer. Used PA gear often comes up cheap and it's better to get used Yamaha, Mackie, etc than new Behringer shit, even if it costs a little more.

Generally speaking, I'd agree with you dspellman, you can never have too many channels but 8 channel is better than nothing. I've lived with 8 mono channels plus 4 stereos for many years. At most gigs where I need my own PA all we mike up is the kick drum and maybe the snare. If I had to mike up the entire kit I'd need to sub-mix it but that doesn't happen very often. I just tell the drummer to smack the skins harder.
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#10
I still have a Behringer Eurotrash 12 channel desk going strong 12+ years. It is not the greatest but I bought it knowing what I am getting. Everything on it still works. Channel 5 got a little noisy with time but besides that, no issues. I also recommend Mackie and Yamaha if they could be found cheap, but you can also live with Behringer.
8 channels is not so bad - that's pretty much what we used. 2 kicks, 3 vocals and an occasional guitar in the mix (the other guys' amp was weaker than mine so needed little push).
#11
But are you dragging the Eurotrash around to gigs? If it's kept in a clean environment it would be ok but expose it to filth and corruption and they shit themselves in pretty short order.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#12
Quote by Cathbard
But are you dragging the Eurotrash around to gigs? If it's kept in a clean environment it would be ok but expose it to filth and corruption and they shit themselves in pretty short order.

I'm not a big gear abuser...it drank a few beers courtesy of our sloppy a** drummer, but I cleaned it regularly with contact cleaner as I like to maintain my gear, so can't tell, but I didn't baby it excessively. It live in the back of my trunk for a few months as well, so I dunno. But lets just say that it didn't look like some of the other mixers I've seen, so I know what you're referring to
#13
Ok so most of you are saying I should avoid this, the lady contacted me today so ill have to respond soon.

Do you guys think it would be worth while if I offered $150? Or should I just avoid all together.

Will any of these mics be capable at all to mic up an amp and do recordings and stuff? I was gonna go out and buy a ShureSM57 which are $120 where I live and i'm sure a couple XLR cords will bring the cost close to this bundle. Were talking Canadian dollars too.

Thanks for all replies
Jackson DK2
1962 Fender Esquire
PEAVEY JSX 212
PEAVEY 6505+ 112
#14
Its OK if you want to go up to $200 but offer $150 by all means.
I'll test everything, if there's no power amp, bring headphones, connect and test every channel amp mic.
The mics should be OK to record. If you plan on singing through them, bring a can of Lysol and spray in a cotton cloth and wipe to disinfect.
#15
The 750 seems like a Shure 58 knockoff so you'd be able to record through it. Test with your voice, clap hands to hear the pickup of the mics, see if you like what you hear back. It is not an accurate representation but it'll do on the spot.

https://www.dagexpress.com/?name=Apex-750-Dynamic-Cardioid-Hand-held-Microphone&product=1030198776

As close to specs I could find

Polar Pattern Cardioid # Frequency Response 50-15000Hz # Sensitivity -72dB # Impedance 600/50k Ohms # Max Input SPL 130dB # S/N Ratio >49dB

Vs Shure 58
Frequency Response: 50 to 15kHz
Polar Pattern: Unidirectional (cardioid), rotationally symmetrical about microphone axis, uniform with frequency
Sensitivity (at 1,000 Hz Open Circuit Voltage): -54.5 dBV/Pa (1.85 mV), 1 Pa = 94dB SPL
Impedance: Rated impedance is 150 ohms (300 ohms actual) for connection to microphone inputs rated low impedance
#16
Cool thanks for all the help. I might as well pick the stuff up if I can get it for $150-$200.
Jackson DK2
1962 Fender Esquire
PEAVEY JSX 212
PEAVEY 6505+ 112
#17
I have been using a Behringer board (Xenyx 1222 USB) for just short of a year now and it has worked flawlessly. Without getting out my datebook I'd say it has done about 50 gigs and at least a third of them were outside gigs this past the summer on a boat dock within 10 feet of a lake often in 90 degree heat and no problems with the Behringer mixer. That being said, I would pass on the DOD board and mics. For $300.00 you can pick up a 1. a board (Behringer, Soundcraft etc.) with built in effects, 2. a few Shure PG 48 mics (3 pack of PG 48 with 3 cables and three mic stands with booms for $120.00 new on MF) decent sounding starter mics. That's a decent start for a PA. You'll still need an amp and speakers or active speakers but I would pass on this old stuff.

IMHO if you are putting a band together I would suggest each person buy their own mic and mic cords. I have found that people who don't buy their own mics tend not care too much about destroying yours and they will and they won't relace them.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Dec 9, 2014,