#1
One of the biggest problems I have is being able to "multitask" 2 musical situations at once. Singing while playing guitar. Playing drums. Stuff like that.
I don't know how to separate two things so they don't interfere with eachother.

What are some things I can do to develop independence between such tasks?
Guitars:
Davison SG
Line 6 Variax 600
Line 6 JTV 69s
Squier Classic Bibe Telecaster Thinline
#2
Practice.
Quote by AlanHB
It's the same as all other harmony. Surround yourself with skulls and candles if it helps.
#3
For me, there are 2 main different sorts or factors of this.

One is to practice one part so much that it becomes easy, so you only need to focus on the other. You can walk and do a number of other things independently, because walking has become incredibly easy.

The other is kind of like tapping your head while rubbing your tummy, but also more than that. It is more difficult to conceive of, say drums, as you, doing one rhythm on hihat, and one on kick, and another on snare, each as separate things.

It is easier to think of it as one whole. As one part relative to another, so your kick comes right after one hihat or whatever. Sometimes you need to slow shit right down to figure that out properly.
#4
Quote by fingrpikingood
For me, there are 2 main different sorts or factors of this.

One is to practice one part so much that it becomes easy, so you only need to focus on the other. You can walk and do a number of other things independently, because walking has become incredibly easy.

The other is kind of like tapping your head while rubbing your tummy, but also more than that. It is more difficult to conceive of, say drums, as you, doing one rhythm on hihat, and one on kick, and another on snare, each as separate things.

It is easier to think of it as one whole. As one part relative to another, so your kick comes right after one hihat or whatever. Sometimes you need to slow shit right down to figure that out properly.


There are some tad bit complicated things I can play that came with slow practice to work out the timing, but it seems like some people just have a really natural feel for that stuff.

What I want to do is try to make it more natural feeling.
Guitars:
Davison SG
Line 6 Variax 600
Line 6 JTV 69s
Squier Classic Bibe Telecaster Thinline
#6
Quote by fingrpikingood

It is easier to think of it as one whole. As one part relative to another, so your kick comes right after one hihat or whatever. Sometimes you need to slow shit right down to figure that out properly.

This. To me it is one whole, at least when I try to play some drum beats. I don't really think of it as individual parts (unless it's a really simple beat - then I can just think hi-hat plays 8ths and kick and snare play 4ths).

And yeah, I'm sure people who are good at singing and playing at the same time have done it for a long time. You need to practice it. Nobody learned anything without practicing it first.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Dec 8, 2014,
#7
Quote by Clay-man
There are some tad bit complicated things I can play that came with slow practice to work out the timing, but it seems like some people just have a really natural feel for that stuff.

What I want to do is try to make it more natural feeling.


Yes, some people have a really natural feel for music. Not everyone perceives music the same way. Most songs are and have been real natural and easy for me, but some stuff is still tough. Also, once you learn one kind of interaction, that one's in the books forever. If you come across a similar rhythmic situation, it will come more naturally, so they do stack.

But it is true that some people have an innate sensibility to rhythm that others don't.

For singing and guitar there are a few factors though. There is how comfortable you at playing the guitar part for instance. The better you are at guitar, the easier it is. I've gotten to the point where I could improvise you a solo, while holding a conversation with you.

A lot of people take shortcuts and change the guitar rhythm as well, so it matches up with the signing rhythm. But if you worked out the weird situations, you would be making yourself more powerful at this skill.

It's similar to this. Just try it. After a while as you kind of develop an understanding of the syncopation you can more readily freestyle with that technique, but at first, it seems like the most impossible thing in the universe, even though it appears childish and simple.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlkgcifDtSU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AdabrSxFShs

Some people do have a natural skill, and stuff does come more easily to them than others, but some stuff appears to be easier, because they've worked on it also. Every great musician has practiced a lot. I can promise you that.
#8
To me singing and playing is just like learning to use both hands when playing. When you first learned guitar, you learned to finger chords. You then learned strumming techniques. Remember how hard it was the first time to strum and finger chord changes properly? Similarly, when you were struggling with a complicated picking patterns, you probably worked the picking pattern out with one hand, then introduce the left hand fingerings.

Ultimately playing guitar is doing two unique tasks (left hand, right hand) at the same time. At the beginning this is hard cause your brain is not use to each hand's role performing independent tasks. As you progress as a guitar player, learning new songs, techniques, etc. is easier because your brain is more used to controlling both hands doing separate things. Now when you learn a new song, I imagine that you learn both hands at the same time. You can do this cause your brain is practiced in both doing and learning both tasks simultaneously.

Singing is simply adding a third task to the equation. It takes practice to get your brain used to doing all three things at once, but the more songs you learn to sing and play, the easier it is to learn each new song. IMO the best way to learn this is to start with easy songs and easy rhythm patterns. This will train your brain to do all three tasks at the same time and provide a foundation for you to learn harder, more complex songs.

I have no experience in singing while drumming, or drumming at all for that matter, but I imagine this is even harder cause in addition to each hand having a role, your feet play a role as well. That sounds like a lot of multi-tasking to me!