#1
I've been taking a look at several YT vids, trying to understand the CAGED system for locating notes on the fretboard. Tough go, for some reason. However, I had seen something before which seems much simpler:
I am in standard tuning, EADGBE.
I am knowledgeable of the chromatic scale.
1) On strings EAD, I move up one string towards high E, then two frets towards the body, then one string up again towards high E. This gives me the same note.
2) On strings GB, I do the same as in #1, yet move THREE frets towards the body, then one string up. Again, same note.
3) To find the same note on the high E string, I move up to high E from B string, then SEVEN frets down. Same note.
I couldn't find the notes quite as quickly as "secretguitarteacher" (nice English gentleman), but with practice, I believe I wouldn't need to do any finger tracing to find the notes. I might even become proficient enough to reverse the process.
Is anyone else familiar with this method? Could it be just as useful as the caged system? Or will I encounter drawbacks? SIDEBAR: I was using a shorter scale acoustic to work all this out, and in trying to quickly slide down the high E seven frets to get to the note, realized that a longer scale, say on a Stratocaster electric, seems to alleviate to some degree ending up on the wrong fret. Maybe at least in this respect a 25.5 scale length is better for shredding.
Last edited by pointnplink at Dec 7, 2014,
#2
Quote by pointnplink
I've been taking a look at several YT vids, trying to understand the CAGED system for locating notes on the fretboard. Tough go, for some reason. However, I had seen something before which seems much simpler:
I am in standard tuning, EADGBE.
I am knowledgeable of the chromatic scale.
1) On strings EAD, I move up one string towards high E, then two frets towards the body, then one string up again towards high E. This gives me the same note.
2) On strings GB, I do the same as in #1, yet move THREE frets towards the body, then one string up. Again, same note.
3) To find the same note on the high E string, I move up to high E from B string, then SEVEN frets down. Same note.
I couldn't find the notes quite as quickly as "secretguitarteacher" (nice English gentleman), but with practice, I believe I wouldn't need to do any finger tracing to find the notes. I might even become proficient enough to reverse the process.
Is anyone else familiar with this method? Could it be just as useful as the caged system? Or will I encounter drawbacks? SIDEBAR: I was using a shorter scale acoustic to work all this out, and in trying to quickly slide down the high E seven frets to get to the note, realized that a longer scale, say on a Stratocaster electric, seems to alleviate to some degree ending up on the wrong fret. Maybe at least in this respect a 25.5 scale length is better for shredding.


CAGED is much more powerful than finding the same notes. But your observation is nonetheless a good one. It's also good to know the fretboard for doing that. For longer reaches, it is easier that way. You can't always see the whole fretboard. Once you pass the 12th fret, the dot pattern repeats again.

I find caged more powerful for arpeggios and soloing, and playing chords/songwriting.

The more stuff you know, the more it intermixes and strengthens each other. CAGED is not so tough. For guitar you just need to take one step at a time. It looks like a lot, but it's not so bad if you take it step by step. Like learning a new city or map in a game, or building. At first it seems so big and disorienting, but you get to know it, and then it doesn't seem so bad at all, and you wonder how it could have seemed so complicated in the first place.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Dec 8, 2014,
#3
The caged system for me makes most sense when it comes to finding chords up and down the neck (moving open chord shapes up to different roots) than it does for finding individual notes.
#4
Quote by pointnplink
I've been taking a look at several YT vids, trying to understand the CAGED system for locating notes on the fretboard. Tough go, for some reason. However, I had seen something before which seems much simpler:
I am in standard tuning, EADGBE.
I am knowledgeable of the chromatic scale.
1) On strings EAD, I move up one string towards high E, then two frets towards the body, then one string up again towards high E. This gives me the same note.
2) On strings GB, I do the same as in #1, yet move THREE frets towards the body, then one string up. Again, same note.
3) To find the same note on the high E string, I move up to high E from B string, then SEVEN frets down. Same note.
I couldn't find the notes quite as quickly as "secretguitarteacher" (nice English gentleman), but with practice, I believe I wouldn't need to do any finger tracing to find the notes. I might even become proficient enough to reverse the process.
Is anyone else familiar with this method? Could it be just as useful as the caged system? Or will I encounter drawbacks? SIDEBAR: I was using a shorter scale acoustic to work all this out, and in trying to quickly slide down the high E seven frets to get to the note, realized that a longer scale, say on a Stratocaster electric, seems to alleviate to some degree ending up on the wrong fret. Maybe at least in this respect a 25.5 scale length is better for shredding.


You may find this helps you. http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/drastically_reduce_learning_time_with_intervals_part_3.html#215115. This is the 3rd article, but it links to the 2nd one in the intro, and that to the 1st.

cheers, Jerry
#6
Your welcome, pointnplink. If there is anything unclear in those articles, I'd be very interested to hear. I'd also love to hear if this stuff actually moves things on for you, if you try it out.
cheers, Jerry

BTW: I didn't cover the interval of 0 semitones ... which is what you get by playing the exact same pitch twice, either on different instruments, or both on the same instrument on adjacent strings.

The shape for 5 semitones is the vertical straight line (on all string pairs apart from G,B).

So, for example, if I play the 8th fret on the bass E string, then the 8th fret on the adjacent A string produces a pitch 5 semitones higher. If I move that top pitch back by 1 fret to the 7th fret, this is now 5-1 = 4 semitones higher than the 8th fret on the bass E. If if I move that top pitch back from the 8th fret to the 3rd fret, this top pitch is now 5-5 = 0 semitones higher than the 8th fret on the bass E ... i.e the same pitch.

An easy way to apply this is the following. Put your little finger on the 8th fret (for example on the bass E string) and your first finger on the 5th fret on the same string. Now look at your first finger, concentrate on it, , and simply slide that finger down 2 frets, keeping that exact same shape. Then try this imagining you are holding down the 1st finger as above, and imagine sliding it down by 2 frets from that imaginary 5th fret. Do this a few times, with both fingers on, and sliding, and then just with your little finger on, and make the pretend slide of 2 frets with your imagined first finger. Once you've got this, then, at that fret where your first finger is (e.g 3rd fret for this example, on 6th string), jump across on same fret to adjacent string. Finally, collapse the above into one imagined slide to the correct fret and immediately move across to the 5th string, without touching the 6th string).

You do the exact opposite if you'r on a higher string, and want to play the same pitch ojn the adjacent lower string. This time, place your 1st finger on the start. Imagine your 4th finger 3 frets higher. Then imagine movihng that finger up 2 frets ... so this pitch is 5 semitones above the start on string. Then cross strings vertically tio the adjacent lower string, thus dropping 5 semitones ...result = 5 - 5 = 0 semitones again.

On the G.B pair, same idea, but now use 4 semiitones, not 5.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Dec 8, 2014,
#7
Knowing your root notes of the open major chords (CAGED) is key. For instance, try finding every C across the fretboard starting with the C major chord shape (third fret A, first fret B) then of the A chord shape starting where you left off with C (third fret A, fifth fret G, then of the G shape, E, D, etc). Pick one note and find each going up the fretboard using that pattern, then move up a whole step to D and do the same. After a while it really starts to set in, but it is daunting at first. Once you get down the pattern for single notes, chord voicings, scales and arpeggios can be applied as well