#1
Anyone played both?
I'm into prog rock, psychedelic rock and jazz and i need a versatile guitar.
The schecter seems so versatile but i cant find a decent demo to listen. The epiphone on the other hand sounds exactly how i want-im in love with the P90.
Can the schecter produce a nice jazz tone?
#2
Forgot to mention that i dont have access to a schecter ultra in europe. Nighthawk is rare too. A friend of mine is in the USA right now and will bring the guitar with him, but he's got no idea of musical instruments:P
Last edited by JohnnyTheElf at Dec 8, 2014,
#3
That's hard to tell. I'd say probably the Nighthawk as it'll have better resell in the long run.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#4
I know nothing about the Schecter, but the Nighthawk is a sweet little guitar.
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#5
Quote by JohnnyTheElf
Anyone played both?
I'm into prog rock, psychedelic rock and jazz and i need a versatile guitar.
The schecter seems so versatile but i cant find a decent demo to listen. The epiphone on the other hand sounds exactly how i want-im in love with the P90.
Can the schecter produce a nice jazz tone?


What P90? Not on the Nighthawk custom I've played...
There's a minihum, a single coil, and the slanted humbucker.

I honestly have never seen that particular Schecter before, and having seen it, I have to admit that I probably wouldn't have given it a second look; it's not particularly my style.

I've played both the Epiphone and the early-90's version Gibson Nighthawk custom, and the Gibson is on my shortlist. The Gibson, however, was an all-mahogany guitar, while the Epiphone has a much lighter body. Given the small body size and a lighter-weight body wood, you do want to make sure you don't get a neck-heavy guitar (not a concern with the Gibson version). Only a few of the Epis have been, but that's down to variations in the body wood density.

I think the Nighthawk is a brilliant guitar; the minihum is almost a perfect neck pickup, and the bridge humbucker is very good. FWIW, Seymour Duncan will make you replacement humbuckers in that offset slanted style in a variety of winds. There are actually four different Gibson variations on the Minihum (construction variations), so if you replace that, you should learn what those are before you place an order.

The Nighthawk was never overwhelmingly popular, in part because a lot of folks saw it as an odd body variation on a Les Paul, rather than as a completely different guitar. But it was never designed to be LP-like; its body is actually a bit of a disservice to the design.
Altogether, though, it's a very nice piece, and I'm really surprised that Epiphone has done as good a job as they have on the Nighthawk Custom reissue. I think if I were going to buy this guitar, I'd have the switching set up to mimic the original (not reissue) Gibson MIII, however.

As an aside: I have three other guitars that fill the "most versatile" role and that might merit your consideration.

One is a fairly standard HSH superstrat with a Master Volume, Master Tone, a five-way switch, a pair of miniswitches that coil tap the humbuckers and a third miniswitch that acts as a "bridge pickup add-in" switch when the five-way is in the forward two positions. You'll have to run a count of the number of options that provides.

Another is an original '70's Gibson LS6. It has a six-way pickup selector switch that does some interesting things with Parallel mode on humbuckers and with phase switching. In addition, one of the three controls is a Mids rolloff pot (what we call a "tone" control" is nothing of the kind, of course, it's just a treble rolloff). You have to try it. The LS6 is another guitar that suffered from having the Les Paul as a big brother; it's also a single cut, but wider and flatter (SG-flat, as a matter of fact). It's Gibson's first 24 fret guitar and those 24 frets are far more accessible than those on an SG. The thinner body means that the neck/body transition lacks a clunky neck heel, and that's a very good thing if you're playing the upper frets, so this is a far more capable and comfortable guitar than any Les Paul. Solid maple body and neck, and never neck-heavy, a great-playing guitar (even if it reminds people of road-killed Les Paul.

And finally, I want to call your attention to the two most popular guitars in the Variax line (the LP-like 59 and the strat-like 69). Line 6 has lower prices on these this year AND they have a $150 rebate if it's a Holiday buy. The tele, strat, LP and ES-335 models are especially good, and I've even been pleasantly surprised by the ES-175 and L5 jazz box models. I've got three Variaxes now (the most recent the JTV-89F), and I'm seriously contemplating a backup second 89F in the next few weeks.
#6
I can't speak of the Ultra, but I played the nighthawk while testing portable amps. I was blown away by the playability and sound of that guitar. I almost walked out with axe instead of the amp.
#7
Thanks for the answers.

First of all I forgot to mention my budget which is about 500$. So the Gibson and the line 6 are out of my league. Moreover I'm not really fond of the line 6. As for the superstrats I own an Ibanez-don't remember the model right now. I did not choose to have it and never liked it. Perhaps a superstrat with nice pups would do the job but that thing is like a cheap metal machine:P
If I manage to have some more money, I'll probably go for an Eastwood-Airline H-77. It seems fantastic for what I want and I can have a bigsby on it later.

Ps: Sorry for my rusty english.
#8
Quote by JohnnyTheElf
Thanks for the answers.

First of all I forgot to mention my budget which is about 500$. So the Gibson and the line 6 are out of my league. Moreover I'm not really fond of the line 6.


Re the Variax. I get it.

I really wanted the electronics of the Variax (this is sometime back), but thought the guitar was lame. This is in reference to the very first Variaxeseses that were out -- the ones that everyone typified as "$1500 worth of electronics in a $200 guitar." I bought a 500-series electric with the intention of using it as a donor; its guts were to be ripped out and put into a custom-built guitar that also had magnetic pickups.

From this:

To, oh...this:





And Later:
i wasn't all that thrilled with the new bunch of guitars, and I grudgingly bought the JTV-89F because I wanted a Floyd on the guitar. The result: an awesome guitar. Who knew?
Last edited by dspellman at Dec 12, 2014,