#1
My last band recorded all our practices and got a lot of ideas out of long, drawn-out jams which got pretty messy. I'd listen to these in the following weeks, and extract ideas out of the things we were playing, discuss these with the group through social media, and then iterate on the jam the next practice session.

I'm wondering how others collaborate. I'm working on a class project right now which has created a short survey, in addition to the discussion here. Here is the survey if you'd like to contribute (previously posted in The Pit, got some ... interesting responses).
#3
100% Collective Improv all the time.

No melodies, no chords, no songs, no soloing.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#4
In most bands I've been in, jams inspire ideas for people to take home and flesh out a little more on their own and then come back the next time and see if the band can finish fleshing it out.

I don't think I've written a single song without some form of jamming. It's like musical brainstorming. It's important

Jams are also pretty essential for 'getting the feel' of bandmates. I was in this cover band last year and it was dreadful. The other guitarist/singer hated jams because 'they go on forever', so, naturally, we never jammed. That resulted in some serious flow/rhythmic issues and completely closed the door to any artistic freedoms.
#6
I've never actually been in a jam but here's how I'd do it. I'd tell the drummer to name a song he knows and likes and play it. Then everyone else will do what they want while keeping in sync. It's okay if it sounds dissonant/chaotic or unorganized, it's a jam. This should sound decent and get a feel for the other members' styles. You may even write a part to a new song this way.

I personally prefer remixing and transcribing to get inspiration (I usually over complicate things anyway and make it sound fresh). Overall I wish I could jam with someone and these are just guidelines.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#7
Quote by Clownmite
My last band recorded all our practices and got a lot of ideas out of long, drawn-out jams which got pretty messy. I'd listen to these in the following weeks, and extract ideas out of the things we were playing, discuss these with the group through social media, and then iterate on the jam the next practice session.

I'm wondering how others collaborate. I'm working on a class project right now which has created a short survey, in addition to the discussion here. Here is the survey if you'd like to contribute (previously posted in The Pit, got some ... interesting responses).


My band jams for a long time and over time those jams are refined into songs.

That being said, everyone always comes in with new material to try out / jam on and the vocalist always have lyrics he's working on that he can throw together.
#8
Just play that is all!

Play whatever you like or learn it.

It is all that simple and is my basic guitar thing since I started out back in the late '80s.

In 2001 I was in a cover band and the lead guitarist. There were no rules on how I should play the songs so I just played and improvised but mostly the leads which I did not copy note for note but some key elements here and there.

After that I got a Jimi Hendrix trio together and I was the guitarist + lead vocal. Second atempt of the right bass and drummer taught me how important the RIGHT people are for the music.

At the 3rd time we practised together I started to play the main riff to Who Knows by the band of gypsies. Bass player joined in and then the drummer making it sounding just as in the pocket/groove of the BOG version. I did not stop and improvised my way through it including the lyrics. I still got a copy of it and it got some pretty cool pieces but does not sound long or drawn out.

We ended up jamming to much without direction but when we played together it sounded pretty magical like Cream!
#9
Not playing consistently with the same bands at the moment, but when i was in music school we did a lot of jamming for different purposes.

For example i was part of a fusion/jazz group that consisted of guitar, keys, bass and drums. We had a couple of different jams we did.

1) The bass player and drummer together. The bassist and drummer were room-mates during our time in school, so they would often practice together separate from me and the keyboard player. They used to practice different kinds of grooves, different kind of meters, different rhythmic concepts together. I remember i would always walk into the main building that had all the practice rooms in the morning and they would have been up for 2 hours working on 2 grooves for 1 hour/groove. They often chose 5 grooves to work on for a 3 month period, no fills allowed. They are still to this day among the tightest people i have ever played with, great timing.

2) Me and the keyboard player. Similar to the bass player and drummer, my room-mate was the keyboard player of the group. So we would often get up in the morning and work on different concepts aswell. Chord voicings over tunes, improvisational concepts, rhythmic comping, exchanging lines, soloing at the same time etc. Same as with the bassist and drummer, choose a couple of topics and stick to them the coming 3 months.

3) Full band jams. This could be either free improv, just getting something going, or it could be over the changes to a tune we were working on in school, or a set of changes that one of us had come up with. And we would later base our compositions upon these jams.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."