#1
Hey all,

Can't seem to find much about this type of pain. I have a pain directly in the middle of the back of my left hand (not the palm side). The pain came after hours of practising scales. I'm new to lead guitar and I've started to learn the 1st pattern of the 3 notes per string system.

The pain goes fairly quickly when I stop, but it can still be felt during the occasional hand movement (such as typing) but it is fairly dull.

I sat down and played the scale very lightly and found it was really only when my fingers were on the top two strings (E & B) that the pain was sharp. I tried moving my thumb position but it didn't help a whole lot.

Guessing I'll need to take a break for a few days which sucks cus I'm absolutely loving guitar atm, even if it's a lot of repetitive back and forth practice.

Any advice? Is this RSI? Tendon pain? Or what? Anyone else had this?
#2
Any time you feel pain, stop and shake it off simple as that.

If you are not used to doing heavy scale work and 3 note per string stuff, it is a culture shock and lactic acid builds up quickly, so shake it off. Eventually when muscle memory and strength build up you won't need to rest as much.
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#3
So you think my hand just needs to rest for a few days and remove a build up of lactic acid? Can it take a few days for it to flush out completely?

EDIT: On second thoughts I don't think this is the problem as there's not really any muscles in the back of the hand. I should have said the pain now comes on fairly quickly (not after hours).
Last edited by gweddle.nz at Dec 9, 2014,
#4
Quote by gweddle.nz
So you think my hand just needs to rest for a few days and remove a build up of lactic acid? Can it take a few days for it to flush out completely?

EDIT: On second thoughts I don't think this is the problem as there's not really any muscles in the back of the hand. I should have said the pain now comes on fairly quickly (not after hours).


Sure there are. All of those tendons that connect your fingers to your wrist are back there. Wiggle your fingers in a pretend legato motion and look at the back of your hand. See those muscles moving? That's what's getting worked out. You're developing those tendons and that's what is feeling sore.

Listen to your body. If it hurts too much to play, stop playing and give it a little time. But as long as your form is correct (and it probably isn't going to be incorrect enough to give you actual muscle damage), you'll be fine. It's just growing pains.
#5
Quote by gweddle.nz
So you think my hand just needs to rest for a few days and remove a build up of lactic acid? Can it take a few days for it to flush out completely?

EDIT: On second thoughts I don't think this is the problem as there's not really any muscles in the back of the hand. I should have said the pain now comes on fairly quickly (not after hours).


No thats not what I meant - the lactic build up is only a very short term thing. Use it as a sign to shake out and rest for a min or two. Longer lasting pain is an indication of damage (RSI/Tendonitis).

Rest up for a few days, hopefully that'll be fine. If not go see a doctor. But in future playing, always listen to your body. If your hand hurts stop playing simple. If you feel tense, shake out and rest for a min.

I've seen many good players get serious damage and have to take a year or so out. It's a real issue and shouldn't be ignored as oh I don't think it'll be a problem for me mindset etc
Bands:
Native State
A Titan, A Deity
Rash L.A

Gear:
PRS P245 Semi Hollow
Suhr Modern Guthrie Spec
Mayones Regius 7 Buckeye Burl
LSL CVS Studio Strat
Fender American Standard Tele
Faith Hi Gloss Venus

Mesa Lonestar Special
Bugera 333
Zilla 2x12 Fatboy
Line 6 PodHD500
#6
Thanks to you both

I played some gat last night, but was very careful about my technique and tried to keep my fret pressure very light. I didn't experience any pain. I guess it's tendon pain which is bad, but I'm going to continue to do hand warm up exercises now before a jam/practice session.
#7
Ideally, do stretches for your neck, shoulders, forearms, wrists, hands, both before and after playing. Take breaks (even a few minutes) every half hour or so. Better safe than sorry. I've been there (RSI, injury ... and it's not nice ... if you get it badly (I did), you physically can't play for literally months, and the bad news is the brain / hand / finger pathways gets corrupted so you lose fine control which is hard to regain).

Have fun, but be careful!!

cheers, Jerry
#8
hi, i'm copy/pasting this form another thread, because its probably a similar problem:

if anything hurts you're doing it wrong and doing it wrong 100000 times wont make u a fast player. You're obviously building a lot of tension in you'r pinky. the only way to deal with this is:
1. stop with this exercise for 2 week
2. start warming up properly. don't know where're you form but if you have winter now, you have to pay special attention the worming up. do this. start warming up for 15 min before you grab your guitar. put a warm (not to hot) water in a sink and put both of your arms in the sing (arms down from elbow). rise you fretting hand finger tips out of the water (you dont want to soften them, before practicing) but everything else is under water for 3min. after that take your hand out, dry them, so they dont get cold again. than do warm up. rotating your wrists (check John Petrucci DVD, and do the warm up he does without guitar and with guitar).
3. when you start working on speed start slooowwllly: play a chromatic scale in whole notes 60bmp. so you play one note every 4 beats and 60 bmp!!! this is crucial. and while you're doing this you should concentrate on relaxing your entire body. and relaxing every finger after it played the not it was suppose to.

form post you wrote it's probably only an unreleased tension. as soon as u start to play faster you tens up you pinky muscle.