#1
Hy,

I've been having a fret buzz for quite a while, but I didn't really dare to fiddle with the setup. However it is really bugging me and I want to fix it.
I allready tried to make the bridge higher, but that didn't help much. It's mostly on the low e string. The action is now about 5mm high. The buzz starts from around the 5th fret. I think the problem is that the neck isn't curved at all (which I suppose should be a little bit). I added some pictures so you can have a better idea of what the situation is. What are your suggestions?

Greatings,

http://imgur.com/Q2oZLN0
http://imgur.com/p4ilykd
http://imgur.com/HXpwL33
http://imgur.com/GVt8N51
http://imgur.com/QTs3XVc
http://imgur.com/3jZvDfZ
#2
If the fret buzz occurs on the 5th fret and below, adjusting the truss rod is what I'd try first.

From the pictures it looks like the neck is almost going into a backbow, but that could just be the perspective of the photographs.

You need to measure the neck relief more accurately. You can do this just by measuring the string height between the 7th fret and the string (any string, it doesn't matter), when the same string is fretted at both the 1st fret and the 16th. You should have a 0.5mm gap approximately. If there's no gap at the 7th fret at all, then that could well be why you're getting fret buzz.

The ideal action of the guitar is very dependent on how you play and the string gauge you're using. As a rule of thumb, 1.6mm on the bass side and 1.2mm on the treble side at the 12th fret is close enough for most people.

Don't be afraid to set up your own guitar. I would go so far as call it a necessity to know how, to really find what is ideal for you.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Dec 10, 2014,
#3
I don't think there is a backbow, but definitely also not the other way. An as far as I can see, there is almost no gap when pushing the first and 16th fret. And as you describe it, my 5mm height is very high?
Lastly, it is not a fretbuzz below the 5th fret, it starts at the 5th, but becomes worse when going up the neck. (For example on the 3rd fret there is no buzz)
#4
Your action is extremely high assuming you're measuring from the 12th fret. Where you measure the action from is very important and measuring from the 12th is typical.

If the guitar buzzes on particular frets, but not others adjacent to the buzzing frets, it means your frets are not level and you'll need to take the guitar to a tech to fix that. If the fret buzz on the 5th fret and above is just bad all over the neck (and not on any particular fret), even with action that high, it could just be that the fret levelling is terrible on the guitar in general, or the neck angle is out of whack (hopefully that isn't the case).
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Dec 10, 2014,
#5
I measured the action on the 12th fret, so indeed it is very high.
When taking a closer look at it, the buzz seems to be more or less over the entire neck. What I will probably try this weekend is to adjust the trussrod so it has more relief and then probably lower the action again.

And even though I'm not an expert, the frets seem pretty even to me.
#6
Uneven frets aren't something you can see. They're often uneven by an invisible amount, a fret will only need to buzz if it's 0.001" lower than the adjacent frets. The way you determine if a guitars frets is uneven is by taking a short straight edge that's dead flat and placing the straight edge over 3 frets at a time, and see if the straight edge sits over the frets dead flat. If the straight edge has a tendency to rock from side to side, it means that a fret isn't level.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.