#1
Hey guys, I've got a few questions and a few links to share. Maybe a few of you guys could help shed some light on my dilemma. So first off, i'm looking to start playing some heavy blues rock. Like these guys there https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPYLtfYu-vQ But i dont know where to start. Where do i look for certain scales and what sort of tuning should be used? I play in C tuning a lot and i really like that tuning, it's just i don't really know where to go from there. Here's another band that i really like and i am looking to play like them. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSmrvjwaNp4 My buddy and i are looking into starting a band, so any feedback is greatly appreciated. I know the questions i am asking some of you may be saying "what the **** is this guy on" , but i really need help because i want to progress as a musician. I've hit a brick wall because i cant seem to get a grip on heavy blues rock. Thank you for taking time to read this, much appreciated.
#2
Alright, go back in time and listen to the bands that invented this sound. Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Blue Cheer, Led Zepplin, Grand Funk Railroad. They laid all the groundwork and are the mother ship for heavy blues/rock. Everything is basically in the pentatonic scale so only 5 notes to worry about. Any tuning will work as those same 5 notes are used. C tuning just means really slack strings.

Have fun!
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#3
Quote by Cajundaddy
Alright, go back in time and listen to the bands that invented this sound. Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Blue Cheer, Led Zepplin, Grand Funk Railroad. They laid all the groundwork and are the mother ship for heavy blues/rock. Everything is basically in the pentatonic scale so only 5 notes to worry about. Any tuning will work as those same 5 notes are used. C tuning just means really slack strings.

Have fun!

What types of pentatonic blues scales work the best? I play c and d scales a lot. Thanks for the response
#5
there's only six notes in the blues scale, play in whatever key your e string is in and you'll soon get the hang of it.

check out more mellow bands like The white stripes and The Black Keys, there's a bit more diversity in their songs in comparison to the more metal sounding bands, if you ask me.
#6
Riffing on "Mothership" at beginning is using Aeolian, with an approach note to the root, to the b7, to the b6 and to the 5. They're dropped to Eb, but if you think this is E, then you've got

Aeolian: 1, 2, b3, 4, 5, b6, b7

E Aeolian: E, F#, G, A, B, C, D.

He's basically just descending the scale, while peddling on open E, so E, D, C, B. But he's adding in a preceding scale note each time. so (D to) E. (C to) D, (B to) C. (A to) B.

Then there's stuff in minor pentatonic (soloing), and parts of E minor blues scale.

cheers, Jerry
#7
Quote by 75mm
What types of pentatonic blues scales work the best? I play c and d scales a lot. Thanks for the response


You're looking in the wrong place for the answers (not to mention that the key doesn't matter, there is only one minor pentatonic blues scale). You can create a heavy enough song for what you want out of any notes you want, the really important thing is the way it's played. Go back and listen to the songs you really like and try to figure out what it is, apart from the choice of notes, that makes them sound the way they do; this is mainly going to be the rhythm of the riffs and the kind of guitar sound used. That's how come you can take those same notes and get such incredibly different things as that Mothership song you posted and something like Nemesis by Arch Enemy; they're the same intervals but everything else is so different that they couldn't sound much more different without being an orchestral piece or similar.
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#8
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
You're looking in the wrong place for the answers (not to mention that the key doesn't matter, there is only one minor pentatonic blues scale). You can create a heavy enough song for what you want out of any notes you want, the really important thing is the way it's played. Go back and listen to the songs you really like and try to figure out what it is, apart from the choice of notes, that makes them sound the way they do; this is mainly going to be the rhythm of the riffs and the kind of guitar sound used. That's how come you can take those same notes and get such incredibly different things as that Mothership song you posted and something like Nemesis by Arch Enemy; they're the same intervals but everything else is so different that they couldn't sound much more different without being an orchestral piece or similar.


I'm attempting to grasp what you are saying. It's not necessarily the scales and the notes played. It's about rhythm and sound? Style rather. Okay, maybe i'm just overthinking this. Anyways, to create such songs i would need to pick a scale though to play in? Correct? If that's correct then what scales would work the best for this style of music? I don't really know how to to go about combining scales.
#9
Learn to play in these positions and then apply them to the music you like:
http://www.coniferguitar.com/Scales_for_guitar/page32/Em_Pentatonic_Scale.html
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Dec 12, 2014,
#10
beside just learning the blues scale, or any other scale. invest some time into close listening of your favorite bands/players and try to identify how they phrase their notes. things like vibrato, bends, slides, rhythm, placement of licks in a bar (on which beat the phrases/licks start) and so on. all blues and rock guitarist play the same scales but they sound different. and you have to know how to get the sound you want out of those universal scales.
#11
Quote by JureGolobic
beside just learning the blues scale, or any other scale. invest some time into close listening of your favorite bands/players and try to identify how they phrase their notes. things like vibrato, bends, slides, rhythm, placement of licks in a bar (on which beat the phrases/licks start) and so on. all blues and rock guitarist play the same scales but they sound different. and you have to know how to get the sound you want out of those universal scales.


Yeah i've been doing that and i think i have a pretty good idea on how some of my favorite bands play. It's just when i pick up my guitar and start playing i get discouraged because i cant seem to go anywhere other than playing the same scale over and over again.
#12
It sounds to me like you're very confused about scales and tuning and that's causing a lot of confusion in the responses here. It appears to me you're using the term 'scales' in the traditional form of 8 notes as in "doh reh mi fah so lah ti do", which is not the scale many are referring to here. What's being referred to here and is the basis of the vast majority of rock and blues is the pentatonic scale which refers to a 5-note scale. This scale is easily adapted to almost any key the song is in as it is based on a specific fretboard pattern on the guitar that can be moved up and down the fretboard to match the key the song is in. That is what is being shown in the link posted by Cajundaddy.

My advice is you go to YouTube and search for the words 'pentatonic scale' and I'm sure you'll find a number of videos that will help you understand that construct and how to apply it. At this stage in your playing you need to master two things, the pentatonic scale and it's positions on the fretboard, and the base key of any given song which will determine the position of the pentatonic scale on the fretboard.

Also if you haven't mastered bar chords you need to get very comfortable with them as they help in you determining where the appropriate pentatonic scale is.
#13
Quote by dunedindragon
It sounds to me like you're very confused about scales and tuning and that's causing a lot of confusion in the responses here. It appears to me you're using the term 'scales' in the traditional form of 8 notes as in "doh reh mi fah so lah ti do", which is not the scale many are referring to here. What's being referred to here and is the basis of the vast majority of rock and blues is the pentatonic scale which refers to a 5-note scale. This scale is easily adapted to almost any key the song is in as it is based on a specific fretboard pattern on the guitar that can be moved up and down the fretboard to match the key the song is in. That is what is being shown in the link posted by Cajundaddy.

My advice is you go to YouTube and search for the words 'pentatonic scale' and I'm sure you'll find a number of videos that will help you understand that construct and how to apply it. At this stage in your playing you need to master two things, the pentatonic scale and it's positions on the fretboard, and the base key of any given song which will determine the position of the pentatonic scale on the fretboard.

Also if you haven't mastered bar chords you need to get very comfortable with them as they help in you determining where the appropriate pentatonic scale is.


http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php?qqq=9&scch=C&scchnam=Pentatonic+Blues&get2=Get&t=11&choice=1

I understand the pentatonic scales, as well as bar chords. The key is usually determined by root notes of the scales right? So for instance if i want my key to be in C, I would land on the note C quite often, also playing in a C pentatonic blues scale. Correct?