#1
I am speaking purely in terms of popular music here/what the masses like to listen to. Whenever I listen to the radio and hear so called "modern rock" it doesnt really sound like rock at all. There are no guitar solos, not many guitar fills and usually besides a few chords it is mostly synth type stuff and bass.

Do you think people nowadays do't really understand/care for classic rock including soloing and riffwork? What do you think it takes for a "modern rock" band to get picked up nowadays? What type of style?
#3
yeah it's pretty much gone for mainstream music
will someone carry me across ten thousand miles under the silence[/center[
#4
Guitar solos have periods of popularity, popular music always moves in waves. Nothing ever dies that will not be reborn and repackaged.
#5
Nope, it's just taking a nap, and alive and well at my house, feels like 1993 all over again.
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#6
In pop music yeah, but if you check out the not so popular rock bands around today like Uncle Acid and the Deadbeats or Earthless, you'll hear guitar solos.
#7
Quote by hanginout
I am speaking purely in terms of popular music here/what the masses like to listen to. Whenever I listen to the radio and hear so called "modern rock" it doesnt really sound like rock at all. There are no guitar solos, not many guitar fills and usually besides a few chords it is mostly synth type stuff and bass.


yup, rock is truly dead. It was murdered by video games, computers and the associated dwindling of attention spans.


Quote by hanginout

Do you think people nowadays do't really understand/care for classic rock including soloing and riffwork?


Yes, I do

Quote by hanginout

What do you think it takes for a "modern rock" band to get picked up nowadays? What type of style?



luck, money, connections, looks.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 11, 2014,
#8
Quote by hanginout
There are no guitar solos, not many guitar fills and usually besides a few chords it is mostly synth type stuff and bass.?


You say that like it is automatically a bad thing.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#10
You tend to hear them more in metal right now. At some point they will come back.

Queens of the Stone Age, Black Keys, Kings of Leon, Arctic Monkeys, etc...all played on the radio and have all been around for 10 years or so....none really feature much in the way of solos or at least anything that would cause the lighting guy to put the spotlight on the guitar player for that long.
#11
I don't really like most solos because most classic rock guys were shit at improv. I don't mind instrumental breaks though. Zeps composed breaks were all better than any of Pages solos (and his breaks weren't necessarily all that good either.) So w/e.

I'm really picky (and probably arbitary) with bands who I do think have good improvisors. The Allman Bros, Hendrix, SRV...I'm drawing a blank. I just don't think most classic rock guitarists are that compelling when it comes to improv.

I mostly listen jazz now for good improv. I'm also starting a bit of a country/bluegrass kick. Lots of good improv there as well.
#12
All the bands I've been in have guitar solos.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#13
Music, in the mass-consumer market at least, has moved from the hyper-guitar-saturated music that brought the instrument to widespread use. Take an intensive, professional course in music appreciation, and you will see how the entire culture is the effect and affected by the changes in music. It's quite magnificent how it all plays out. Eras of time seem to have specific instrument sets: Loosely, we've moved from string orchestras to marching bands to clean guitars to distorted guitars to synthesizers. I wonder where we will go next.

Currently, it seems that most mass-consumed music (let's just say pop, mainstream music) focuses on vocals and driving bass-beats rather than a guitar's screams of pre-2000's. This could be because people are getting progressively dumber, and as such they can't follow complexities. Or it could also be a result of the widespread use of narcotics and alcohol, as the driving bass hits are easier to dance to in an inebriated, trance-like state. It could also be the result of musicians refining their art (ha).
Last edited by Will Lane at Dec 12, 2014,
#14
Quote by GuitarMunky
yup, rock is truly dead. It was murdered by video games, computers and the associated dwindling of attention spans.
ty video games computers and short attentions spans
banned
#16
Quote by Declan87
Guitar solos have periods of popularity, popular music always moves in waves. Nothing ever dies that will not be reborn and repackaged.


+1

It's only a matter of time, really. I've been seeing more and more dudes with acoustics parading around as 'singer-songwriters' playing folk-inspired tunes in the past few years.

Kinda reminds me of Bob Dylan, Woody Guthrie, Joan Baez, Simon & Garfunkel, etc.

It doesn't sound the same, and I wouldn't say the songwriting is quite as thoughtful, but the trend seems to be the same.

One or two of them will pick up an electric guitar, and then who knows what'll happen.

I think it's a little bit of a leap to directly link guitar-based rock with cultural trends, but I think it'd be silly to outright ignore it too. We seem to be moving in a similar direction culturally that ultimately birthed that style of music. It's interesting, and I'm interested to see how it unfolds.

Something's coming. I'm not saying riff-rock is back, but if things keep-on a'chuggin the way they are, people are going to be looking for something other than what's popular now to identify with. Who knows? We may even end up with a whole new genre, and people will be on forums 50 years later calling it 'Dad-[something]' and complaining about people who talk about it. There might even be guitar solos involved

Anyway, what do I know? Just some speculation.
#17
Quote by Will Lane
Music, in the mass-consumer market at least, has moved from the hyper-guitar-saturated music that brought the instrument to widespread use. Take an intensive, professional course in music appreciation, and you will see how the entire culture is the effect and affected by the changes in music. It's quite magnificent how it all plays out. Eras of time seem to have specific instrument sets: Loosely, we've moved from string orchestras to marching bands to clean guitars to distorted guitars to synthesizers. I wonder where we will go next.

Currently, it seems that most mass-consumed music (let's just say pop, mainstream music) focuses on vocals and driving bass-beats rather than a guitar's screams of pre-2000's. This could be because people are getting progressively dumber, and as such they can't follow complexities. Or it could also be a result of the widespread use of narcotics and alcohol, as the driving bass hits are easier to dance to in an inebriated, trance-like state. It could also be the result of musicians refining their art (ha).


I'm pretty sure technology has a lot to do with this, and mass availability at reasonable cost. Go back30 years (?). Midi sequencers provided two things: cheap to record (hard disk), and the big feature: editability. Now people without mechanical skills on an instrument could engage big-time, so a barrier to entry got broken down. Roll on several years: compute power resources keep growing: more powerful s/w is possible ... digital audio is as easy to manipulate as midi. Loops and samples are prevalent. So, plenty of stuff available for creativity, without being able to play a single note. Add in today's state-of-art capabilities like computer generated vocal harmonies and auto correction. From the viewpoint of enabling more and more people to ge involved and enjoy themselves musically, this is great. Some good music, some bad. Nothing new there.

Don't forget the power of technology for media too. Way too easy these days for powerful media machines to reach out, influence and control kids / teens ...

cheers, Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Dec 12, 2014,
#18
Quote by Declan87
Guitar solos have periods of popularity, popular music always moves in waves. Nothing ever dies that will not be reborn and repackaged.


I'll believe this when mandolin orchestras are in vogue again.

Quote by mjones1992
+1

It's only a matter of time, really.


That's what they said about the cittern becoming popular again. 300 years later...
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#19
I still represent the guitar solos fo sho.

If you come to downtown Austin all you hear is endless guitar solos lol
#20
Lazy musicians!

Who is dedicated to learn all the skills proper enough and put it all into songs people want to hear, buy and listen to?

Kurt Cobain was just a fresh answer to guitar craze but it was mainly rhytm as he did not have the skills for solos of importance.
#21
Quote by Will Lane
Music, in the mass-consumer market at least, has moved from the hyper-guitar-saturated music that brought the instrument to widespread use. Take an intensive, professional course in music appreciation, and you will see how the entire culture is the effect and affected by the changes in music. It's quite magnificent how it all plays out. Eras of time seem to have specific instrument sets: Loosely, we've moved from string orchestras to marching bands to clean guitars to distorted guitars to synthesizers. I wonder where we will go next.

Currently, it seems that most mass-consumed music (let's just say pop, mainstream music) focuses on vocals and driving bass-beats rather than a guitar's screams of pre-2000's. This could be because people are getting progressively dumber, and as such they can't follow complexities. Or it could also be a result of the widespread use of narcotics and alcohol, as the driving bass hits are easier to dance to in an inebriated, trance-like state. It could also be the result of musicians refining their art (ha).

Yes, because your music taste is about your IQ and "intelligent" music has guitar solos in it.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#23
Quote by deadsmileyface
ty video games computers and short attentions spans


you don't know what your missing. I guess ignorance is bliss.
shred is gaudy music
#24
Quote by Will Lane
Currently, it seems that most mass-consumed music (let's just say pop, mainstream music) focuses on vocals and driving bass-beats rather than a guitar's screams of pre-2000's. This could be because people are getting progressively dumber, and as such they can't follow complexities. Or it could also be a result of the widespread use of narcotics and alcohol, as the driving bass hits are easier to dance to in an inebriated, trance-like state. It could also be the result of musicians refining their art (ha).


Because most guitar solos in a rock context are really complex and back then nobody used narcotics or alcohol. Grateful Dead fans certainly aren't know for their inebriated trance-like states either.




EDIT: Maggara ninja
Last edited by Duaneclapdrix at Dec 12, 2014,
#25
We occasionally still hear guitar solos on new (as in, the last 5 years) rock songs, so I wouldn't say it's dead. It's just that a lot of radio hits cut out the "less important parts", which includes the guitar solo.
#27
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
We occasionally still hear guitar solos on new (as in, the last 5 years) rock songs, so I wouldn't say it's dead. It's just that a lot of radio hits cut out the "less important parts", which includes the guitar solo.


so they still record them, but just edit them out?
shred is gaudy music
#28
I'd say there are probably more guitar solos in mainstream(ish) rock music today than there were 15 years ago. I'd say if anything they've come back a bit.
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#29
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Yes, because your music taste is about your IQ and "intelligent" music has guitar solos in it.


Seriously. I'm getting really tired of this "pop music fans are too stupid to appreciate real music" meme that we've been getting lately. ****ing snobs.
#30
Quote by theogonia777
I'll believe this when mandolin orchestras are in vogue again.

Ukulele orchestras are very popular in this corner anyway. Same thing.