#1
Drop A guitar, with octaver one octave down.

Does this hurt the speaker? Because it might be too bassy for it?
It's 12 inch speaker.
#2
You should be fine

Some guitar speakers handle lows much better than others, what speaker?
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#3
It's not necessarily the low frequency you should be worried about, it's just the volume of said frequency. If it's distorting or anything just turn the volume down.
Last edited by Joeseye at Dec 13, 2014,
#4
Quote by Joeseye
It's not necessarily the low frequency you should be worried about, it's just the volume of said frequency. If it's distorting or anything just turn the volume down.


Puzzackly.

Anything you're playing an octave down is being played in bass guitar regions. Volume is really important, because a speaker has to move four times the air in order to play an octave-down note *at the same volume* as the note an octave above it. Most guitar speakers lack the ability to move the voice coil back and forth to that degree. They may try, but you'll ruin the speaker unless you ride herd on the volume.

There's also this; most guitar speakers can't reproduce much below about 110Hz. 82Hz is the fundamental frequency of a standard low E on the guitar, so they're already not doing a great job of that, but if you're trying to make your guitar amp reproduce a 41Hz sound accurately, you're going to have a hard time of it.

What you DO hear are the harmonics an octave and two octaves higher. The mathematical relationships between the harmonics produced indicate to your ear that you're *trying* to reproduce those low notes, but that's a long way from actually doing so.

Adding a crossover and a subwoofer and the power to run it to your rig will get you there (google steve lukather's ISP Technologies Vector SL for an example), but trying to do that with an open back 12" combo ain't gonna.
#5
Quote by Robbgnarly
You should be fine

Some guitar speakers handle lows much better than others, what speaker?


Celestion G12H-100
#6
Quote by slash&angus
Celestion G12H-100

yeah your fine
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#8
Quote by KailM
Or you could just get a bass player.


guitar player logic: bass player is easily replaced by doubling my guitar with an octave down.

homeless epidemic, bass players will gig for food.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#9
Quote by KailM
Or you could just get a bass player.


I'm just experimenting with tones man.
By the way our band quit. So that's why I'm trying new stuff out.
#10
It isn't the frequency of a bass that kills guitar speakers, it's the attack. Try as you like, you can't get that attack out of a guitar. If it sounds good, it's all good.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band