#1
good evening my friend just got back to the country and he said he brought a guitar for me

i went to take it ..... now here it is

its says prince rock tremelo on the head stock it a tele shape with unknown pick ups but they are decent

"licensed" floyd rose YEAH RIGHT

and a kill switch that actually works

they told him it was made in indonesia

and this guitar is really heavy

is it worth it getting an original floyd rose installed (will it fit ) and changing the pick ups to an active ones ?












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Last edited by nirvana_n_roses at Dec 14, 2014,
#2
If it plays nice but doesn't sound nice, of course it's more than okay to change pickups.
If the bridge doesn't hold tuning after a good setup and you don't want to hardtail it, change the bridge. You can get the measurements with calipers and then compare those to OFR (note that the 1000 series is really good and a bit cheaper than OFR) or really good licenses, for example, Gotoh and Schaller.
Gear pics

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#3
Quote by Sakke
If it plays nice but doesn't sound nice, of course it's more than okay to change pickups.
If the bridge doesn't hold tuning after a good setup and you don't want to hardtail it, change the bridge. You can get the measurements with calipers and then compare those to OFR (note that the 1000 series is really good and a bit cheaper than OFR) or really good licenses, for example, Gotoh and Schaller.


It sounds good but my next step was getting a guitar with active pick ups and this came in

Couldn't try the bridge the guitar didn't came with the arm I orderd one it should arrive after 2 days

im still searching about the licenses ones

The only 2 I had tried are the original and the kahler
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#4
Nice

Schaller, Floyd Rose and Gotoh have routing templates on their websites so you can measure your own trem and see if they're a direct swap or not. Remember about the size of the studs, often on cheaper trems they're a bit smaller.
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#5
Quote by nirvana_n_roses
It sounds good but my next step was getting a guitar with active pick ups and this came in

Couldn't try the bridge the guitar didn't came with the arm I orderd one it should arrive after 2 days

im still searching about the licenses ones

The only 2 I had tried are the original and the kahler


The licensed ones are great. I like Schallers a lot and Gotoh's too.
I don't wanna say it, but I really don't like Kahler. Period.

You can easily try it if the tremolo isn't blocked. Just push it down gently with your palm between the fine tuners and the saddles. If it returns to perfect pitch, then it should work fine. You can also try to pull it up where you can grab it.
Gear pics

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#6
Quote by Dave_Mc
Nice

Schaller, Floyd Rose and Gotoh have routing templates on their websites so you can measure your own trem and see if they're a direct swap or not. Remember about the size of the studs, often on cheaper trems they're a bit smaller.


thanks dave

once i get back from work im gonna take measurement
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#7
Quote by Sakke
The licensed ones are great. I like Schallers a lot and Gotoh's too.
I don't wanna say it, but I really don't like Kahler. Period.

You can easily try it if the tremolo isn't blocked. Just push it down gently with your palm between the fine tuners and the saddles. If it returns to perfect pitch, then it should work fine. You can also try to pull it up where you can grab it.



unfortunately i cant test it now

tried to tune it to standard it was in drop c

its in standard now but this happened

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Last edited by nirvana_n_roses at Dec 15, 2014,
#8
How many springs are in the back and how long are they? It might just need shorter stiffer springs or more of them. No big deal as long as you have the room in the cavity.
#9
Quote by poppameth
How many springs are in the back and how long are they? It might just need shorter stiffer springs or more of them. No big deal as long as you have the room in the cavity.



i dont know didnt opened the back yet

but this is a normal problem right after that happened i googled it and some pepole had the same thing after changing the tunning
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#10
Yeah, its normal. The string tension is countered by the tension of the springs in the back. So when you increased the tension of the strings by putting them to standard, the tension in the springs was not enough to hold the bridge back, so the strings pulled it forward. You have to open the back, and use the two screws that hold the claw, to tighten the strings until the bridge will be level when you are in tune. This is standard practice on all floyd equiped guitars. Its a pain in the ass to setup, but you really should do it, because keeping it like this cant be healthy for the bridge, and it also messes up your intonation (i think), and tuning stability. And it looks ridiculous.
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#11
Quote by gorkyporky
Yeah, its normal. The string tension is countered by the tension of the springs in the back. So when you increased the tension of the strings by putting them to standard, the tension in the springs was not enough to hold the bridge back, so the strings pulled it forward. You have to open the back, and use the two screws that hold the claw, to tighten the strings until the bridge will be level when you are in tune. This is standard practice on all floyd equiped guitars. Its a pain in the ass to setup, but you really should do it, because keeping it like this cant be healthy for the bridge, and it also messes up your intonation (i think), and tuning stability. And it looks ridiculous.


so this can be done at home i was going to give to a guitar shop to fix it

yeah off course im not going to leave it like this i cant play the strings action is really high i canr hold a simple chord
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#12
Yeah, its fixable at home. Just make sure to take it step by step, tighten the strings a little, and then retune, then tighten the strings, and retune again. Repeat that until it looks good. If you tighten them to much, the bridge will sink into the body, so you have to untighten then if that happens. Its basicly just trial and error, the most you can screw up is breaking a few strings. It still pays to be careful though.

http://www.premierguitar.com/articles/How_to_Set_Up_a_Floyd_Rose_Style_Trem

^this looks like a nice guide. Just do the part about setting up the floyd rose, and afterwards, you will see if your truss rod needs adjustment. That may also happen, since you are changing tunings.
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#13
Quote by gorkyporky
Yeah, its fixable at home. Just make sure to take it step by step, tighten the strings a little, and then retune, then tighten the strings, and retune again. Repeat that until it looks good. If you tighten them to much, the bridge will sink into the body, so you have to untighten then if that happens. Its basicly just trial and error, the most you can screw up is breaking a few strings. It still pays to be careful though.

http://www.premierguitar.com/articles/How_to_Set_Up_a_Floyd_Rose_Style_Trem

^this looks like a nice guide. Just do the part about setting up the floyd rose, and afterwards, you will see if your truss rod needs adjustment. That may also happen, since you are changing tunings.



thanks man i was looking for a good guide
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#14
You can't go to another tuning just like this, even less with a floating bridge.

The total amount of tension from the string has to be equal to those of the spring to keep the bridge "floating", that's how they work. You can't even go from standard tuning to drop with a floating bridge, hell you can't even break a string without the instrument going out of tune.

Even more, when changing tuning you're supposed to either change the gauge of the string, or to adjust the truss rod if you keep the same gauge, and that is with a fixed bridge.

You also need to adjust the hamronics, or you will have tuning issue over the neck. Without proper harmonics, the notes on the open string might not be the same as the one on the 12th frett.

But, fear not, having a new instrument is a great way to learn.

The first step you should do is get a good set of string for the tuning you want.

Then, the second step would be to do a proper change of string on the floating bridge.
After, you'll need to adjust the spring in the back so that it's parallel to the body when the instrument is in tune.

After the instrument is in tune and the bridge is parallel, you'll be able to adjust harmonics.
#15
Quote by t1mman


You also need to adjust the hamronics, or you will have tuning issue over the neck. Without proper harmonics, the notes on the open string might not be the same as the one on the 12th frett.


After the instrument is in tune and the bridge is parallel, you'll be able to adjust harmonics.



Do you mean intonation?
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#16
Lighter strings could be an instant fix or at least wouldn't require as much tweaking. What gauge are the strings on your guitar? Are they the gauge you prefer using? I mean, the guitar was tuned to drop C. I would assume the strings to be quite heavy for standard. Lighter gauge has less tension so they could even be the same tension as the strings you have in your guitar right now in drop C.

If you haven't already change the strings, do it now. You want to set the guitar up for the strings you prefer using. If it has a different gauge than you usually use, you will need to set it up again when you change the strings. So first get new strings. If you keep using the same strings and tuning, it may be that you don't ever need to do these adjustments again.
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Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
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Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
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Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Dec 15, 2014,
#17
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Do you mean intonation?


Yeah! Meant Intonation!
#18
Quote by t1mman
You can't go to another tuning just like this, even less with a floating bridge.

The total amount of tension from the string has to be equal to those of the spring to keep the bridge "floating", that's how they work. You can't even go from standard tuning to drop with a floating bridge, hell you can't even break a string without the instrument going out of tune.

Even more, when changing tuning you're supposed to either change the gauge of the string, or to adjust the truss rod if you keep the same gauge, and that is with a fixed bridge.

You also need to adjust the hamronics, or you will have tuning issue over the neck. Without proper harmonics, the notes on the open string might not be the same as the one on the 12th frett.

But, fear not, having a new instrument is a great way to learn.

The first step you should do is get a good set of string for the tuning you want.

Then, the second step would be to do a proper change of string on the floating bridge.
After, you'll need to adjust the spring in the back so that it's parallel to the body when the instrument is in tune.

After the instrument is in tune and the bridge is parallel, you'll be able to adjust harmonics.



thanks man as you said it a lesson to learn i though changing tuning is the same as changing it on a fixed bridge
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#19
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Lighter strings could be an instant fix or at least wouldn't require as much tweaking. What gauge are the strings on your guitar? Are they the gauge you prefer using? I mean, the guitar was tuned to drop C. I would assume the strings to be quite heavy for standard. Lighter gauge has less tension so they could even be the same tension as the strings you have in your guitar right now in drop C.

If you haven't already change the strings, do it now. You want to set the guitar up for the strings you prefer using. If it has a different gauge than you usually use, you will need to set it up again when you change the strings. So first get new strings. If you keep using the same strings and tuning, it may be that you don't ever need to do these adjustments again.


its daddario Regular Light 10-46

which is what i use for all my guitars
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#20
^ OK. Then it's time to do the adjustments.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115