#1
Okay I have a floyd rose from China, but I was wondering if anyone has experience this with a higher quality floyd rose and could explain why this happens. When I dive bomb my notes all go flat but when I shift the note higher it gets back in tune. It is such a weird phenomenon haha..

Should I replace the entire trem or do you think if i just change the saddles it should fix this problem?
#2
sounds like it could be string slippage at the nut. Either try and tighten the nut or change that first before you change the whole trem.

Its a common problem with cheap floyds.
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#4
It actually got better, but still goes flat a little, it is probably the nut. Thanks, I will get it replaced
#5
with changing the nut, do I have to change the entire piece, or is it okay to just replace the blocks?
#6
Change the whole piece; it's not that big a deal, actually. It just requires undoing a pair of screws that hold it on
#7
It would be better to actually test the nut before assuming it's the problem and wasting time & money. Push on the strings behind the nut to see if it makes them go sharp. Play each string individually open, then immediately push on it behind the nut to see if it goes sharp. If they don't, then the nut is not your problem. It could simply be that you need to just tighten your spring tension claw in the back of the guitar just a slight teeny tiny bit.

If that's the case, you can dive it for it goes flat. Then slowly adjust the claw in the back of the guitar, Just a slight little turn equally on both sides (when I say slight I mean very, very little, like just enough to see the screw start to move). Just do that till it's back to pitch. This is all best done with the guitar in the normal upright playing position since gravity effects the tuning of a floating FR when laying flat.

This is all assuming the FR is already setup properly and the knife edges and post grooves are in good shape. It's also a good idea to lube the knife edges with some chap stick or a tiny drop of air tool or gun oil. If you use one of the oils, IMO it's best to put the drop on the end of a Q-tip and rub it on with that. It makes it easier to keep from over doing it and getting it everywhere. Chap stick is the least smelly out of the 3 and works pretty good.

If I had the guitar in my hands I could evaluate the problem much easier.

I wish you luck.
#8
Is it an old guitar? Reason I am asking is because the flat surface on the clamps that screw on to the strings on the 0 fret on mine were worn and I had the same issue, filed them up a little bit as there were grooves on the back and problem solved.
I'm talking about these:


What about the metal pieces that bite the string on the saddle end? These might also have grooves in them or slip.

I think it could also be the springs but I'll look at the other two first.
Last edited by diabolical at Dec 16, 2014,
#9
it's always a saying that chinese products are of poor quality...even the same brand but made in china is not good...
#11
Quote by Way Cool JR.
It would be better to actually test the nut before assuming it's the problem and wasting time & money. Push on the strings behind the nut to see if it makes them go sharp. Play each string individually open, then immediately push on it behind the nut to see if it goes sharp. If they don't, then the nut is not your problem. It could simply be that you need to just tighten your spring tension claw in the back of the guitar just a slight teeny tiny bit.

If that's the case, you can dive it for it goes flat. Then slowly adjust the claw in the back of the guitar, Just a slight little turn equally on both sides (when I say slight I mean very, very little, like just enough to see the screw start to move). Just do that till it's back to pitch. This is all best done with the guitar in the normal upright playing position since gravity effects the tuning of a floating FR when laying flat.

This is all assuming the FR is already setup properly and the knife edges and post grooves are in good shape. It's also a good idea to lube the knife edges with some chap stick or a tiny drop of air tool or gun oil. If you use one of the oils, IMO it's best to put the drop on the end of a Q-tip and rub it on with that. It makes it easier to keep from over doing it and getting it everywhere. Chap stick is the least smelly out of the 3 and works pretty good.

If I had the guitar in my hands I could evaluate the problem much easier.

I wish you luck.



Hey yeah I think it is the springs, i tested the nut and there were no changes in pitch.
When I worked with the springs it got a little better at staying in tune. I am just working on the low E. It is taking some time but I am learning I think it will work.

Thanks
#12
Quote by Way Cool JR.
It would be better to actually test the nut before assuming it's the problem and wasting time & money. Push on the strings behind the nut to see if it makes them go sharp. Play each string individually open, then immediately push on it behind the nut to see if it goes sharp. If they don't, then the nut is not your problem. It could simply be that you need to just tighten your spring tension claw in the back of the guitar just a slight teeny tiny bit.

If that's the case, you can dive it for it goes flat. Then slowly adjust the claw in the back of the guitar, Just a slight little turn equally on both sides (when I say slight I mean very, very little, like just enough to see the screw start to move). Just do that till it's back to pitch. This is all best done with the guitar in the normal upright playing position since gravity effects the tuning of a floating FR when laying flat.

This is all assuming the FR is already setup properly and the knife edges and post grooves are in good shape. It's also a good idea to lube the knife edges with some chap stick or a tiny drop of air tool or gun oil. If you use one of the oils, IMO it's best to put the drop on the end of a Q-tip and rub it on with that. It makes it easier to keep from over doing it and getting it everywhere. Chap stick is the least smelly out of the 3 and works pretty good.

If I had the guitar in my hands I could evaluate the problem much easier.

I wish you luck.



Hey yeah I think it is the springs, i tested the nut and there were no changes in pitch.
When I worked with the springs it got a little better at staying in tune. I am just working on the low E. It is taking some time but I am learning I think it will work.

I have a feeling the low E is always a half step flat after I dive bomb.. maybe itll fix itself soon. haha
Maybe i just have bad strings on now.

Thanks