#1
Hey guys! I've got a quick short question about solos. What do you guys consider as "core" scales for solos ? And for what types of music are your suggested scales possibly best for ?
Last edited by finnguitarist at Dec 17, 2014,
#3
Guy...wow! your question is a question that takes a lifetime to explorer. It is the essence of your personal approach to playing. It's like kissing. It's way more than just putting your lips on someone else. But to get you going down the path.....all songs are built around a center chord (the key) and a mode (major or minor, usually). The most difficulties in soloing are avoided by noodling around in the main key and mode of the song. After awhile you get tired of that and look for more possibilities, then you can experiment with solo lines following the song chords for a more melodic sound. When that gets old, all chords and modes can be refingered or revoiced into different chord positions and modes.....ie. the chord A can be soloed over in the F#m position. So you substitute the A to an F# and a major to a minor. That's the easiest, it's called a chord substitution. Magically, the A major chord can be replayed in all the modes just by starting at a different place in the A major scale. By that I mean, the the 6th position in the A major scale is F#. So if you play all the A major notes but start at the F# position you are playing F#m over an A major. That's just one of them, there are 7 more different modes you can play over an A just by starting at
a different note in the A major scale. The grand masters of all this stuff are jazz guys. By just playing you eventually learn all this stuff, it just happens...inquiring minds want to know. If you want to learn fast, take chord theory lessons from a jazz guitarist. It's a lifetime journey...have fun!
Last edited by dastop20 at Dec 18, 2014,
#4
Quote by dastop20
Guy...wow! your question is a question that takes a lifetime to explorer. It is the essence of your personal approach to playing. It's like kissing. It's way more than just putting your lips on someone else. But to get you going down the path.....all songs are built around a center chord (the key) and a mode (major or minor, usually). The most difficulties in soloing are avoided by noodling around in the main key and mode of the song. After awhile you get tired of that and look for more possibilities, then you can experiment with solo lines following the song chords for a more melodic sound. When that gets old, all chords and modes can be refingered or revoiced into different chord positions and modes.....ie. the chord A can be soloed over in the F#m position. So you substitute the A to an F# and a major to a minor. That's the easiest, it's called a chord substitution. Magically, the A major chord can be replayed in all the modes just by starting at a different place in the A major scale. By that I mean, the the 6th position in the A major scale is F#. So if you play all the A major notes but start at the F# position you are playing F#m over an A major. That's just one of them, there are 7 more different modes you can play over an A just by starting at
a different note in the A major scale. The grand masters of all this stuff are jazz guys. By just playing you eventually learn all this stuff, it just happens...inquiring minds want to know. If you want to learn fast, take chord theory lessons from a jazz guitarist. It's a lifetime journey...have fun!

When you say mode do you mean mode or pentatonic scale?
The difference being that a mode could refer to any one of eight very specific scales whereas the pentatonic (five note) scales leave out notes that when used in the right musical context would clash horribly unless you had an almost perfect sense of timing and finger control.

To start with, just use the pentatonic scales, major and minor. Each is used for different things. The minor pentatonic scale works over just about anything non-classical except for major key songs in a lot of jazz and country. For an example, let's look at a standard 12 bar blues.

|A---|A---|A---|A---|D---|D---|A---|A---|E---|D---|A---|A---|


Now, as we're in the key of A, we would use a A pentatonic box, in this case I'll show the minor first:

e|-----------------------------------------5----|
B|----------------------------------5--8--------|
G|--------------------------5--7----------------|
D|------------------5--7------------------------|
A|----------5--7--------------------------------|
E|--5--8----------------------------------------|


Basically, E5, D7 and e5 are all A notes, meaning if you were taking a solo, try to finish on these frets, as it would make it sound more complete.

this the major pentatonic for A, it works over the same progression as above but it works differently depending on what the rest of the band is playing.
e|----------------------------------------2--5--|
B|----------------------------------2--5--------|
G|--------------------------2--4----------------|
D|------------------2--4------------------------|
A|----------2--4--------------------------------|
E|-----5----------------------------------------|


just remember that all you really have to do is hit any note in that pentatonic scale during a break and you are improvising a solo.

And if you want to learn to solo in different keys, simply move the box up and down the neck to the desired fret e.g. C is on the 8th fret on E etc.

If any thing confused you, I'll do my best to explain.
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