#1
Hello guys

I play the guitar for around 4 months and I kind of restart from scratch. I am learning from "A modern method for guitar", I sort of wanted something with more structure, like a sort of piano book.

In the book the author says "hey", this are the notes in the first position, and it starts to use more strings in progressive exercises, not in tabs, all with sheet.
The author tells you to not master every exercise, but go to the next when you are able to play at an even tempo.

The problem is I hit a wall, i can see the sheet and read the notes, but when the eights notes appear,the reading plus counting, the moving fingers the metronome and the picking the strings just explode, even at low tempo (metronome in 60 whatever). I sort of can play it if I every tic of the metronome is an eight.

I am supposed to be able to do all that or sort of memorize the sheet bit by bit so I know what comes?

I can play the previous exercises ok. I have a method that i say i can play ok if i manage to play the thing without errors 3 times in a row with even tempo, although it is slow, but i hope speed will come eventually.
#2
Quote by yureguitar
Hello guys

I play the guitar for around 4 months and I kind of restart from scratch. I am learning from "A modern method for guitar", I sort of wanted something with more structure, like a sort of piano book.

In the book the author says "hey", this are the notes in the first position, and it starts to use more strings in progressive exercises, not in tabs, all with sheet.
The author tells you to not master every exercise, but go to the next when you are able to play at an even tempo.

The problem is I hit a wall, i can see the sheet and read the notes, but when the eights notes appear,the reading plus counting, the moving fingers the metronome and the picking the strings just explode, even at low tempo (metronome in 60 whatever). I sort of can play it if I every tic of the metronome is an eight.

I am supposed to be able to do all that or sort of memorize the sheet bit by bit so I know what comes?

I can play the previous exercises ok. I have a method that i say i can play ok if i manage to play the thing without errors 3 times in a row with even tempo, although it is slow, but i hope speed will come eventually.


What's your practice schedule like? How many days a week? How many hours do you practice on those days?

Remember slow is smooth and smooth is fast. Take it slow and if you get stuck pick a day of the week and focus on what's causing your sticking point and nothing else.
#3
Can you describe, even roughly, what you expect to be able to do from studying a learning method? Do you have a wish list of what you'd like to accomplish? Find your way round the guitar without getting lost? Know more chords/scales an dhow to use them? Play other people's tunes? Improvise in a band? Write you own music? What genre(s) of music?

Is this music book going to provide your wish list?

I ask because I believe 100% that music notation (score) is the best way I know, (when starting out) of making it very slow and hard to progress on guitar towards what most people want to achieve

I also believe score or tab is one of the best ways of informing someone precisely how to perform something note for note, but a very poor vehicle for explaining music concepts (you can't see the wood (the concept) for the trees (the notation))

cheers, Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Dec 17, 2014,
#4
I practice around 2 hours each day, now that i have time i play more.

The question was aiming at if i should learn the songs or exercises through repetition bit by bit or being able to play the music by just looking at the sheet.

My aim with the method is to learn how to play songs, with correct timing, smoothly, and I think that can be done with a ton of exercises, songs that are more challenging one after the other.

Before I did the usual stuff, learn chords, learn songs, learn some licks ,struggle with powerchords, but I couldnt find a good method to keep advancing, I played some easy songs thinking that eventually i would learn them faster, but i was a mess in timing and being messy. I do a ton of little exercises about picking and using the fret hand moving fingers in 1234 1324 1423 and play scales and that little exercises in the scales like advance 3 go back 2. or go 4 back 3...

I do some improvization playing random things in pentatonics and jumping between them, playing sort of the ADE thing and staying to those rootnotes.

the main reason for the change was having a thing with many things to play in increasing difficulty with the idea that it makes sense. If i manage to find tabs with the timing, of many songs that are easy, with patience with a metronome it should be good to.
#5
Playing by just looking requires practice and will come over time. You need to go by repetition.

If 60 is too fast lower the tempo, when learning something there is no notion of "too slow" if that's where your skill is atm. Always remember that it's a marathon and not a sprint. With small steps you will look back in a year and see your progression.

A mistake people normally do when starting is wanting to do everything too fast right at the beginning, I made the same mistake. If you increase the tempo 3bpms per day it's still progress, remember that!

Start by playing something at a tempo slow enough that you can play 100% of the song. After the muscle memory kicks in and you can play it by heart, start increasing the tempo 5bpms at a time. Eventually you'll play it at full speed, but it will take time depending on the song.

I guess the most important thing to remember is not to rush it and that it's a long term run, not a sprint.
#6
I agree here.

Find the tempo where you can follow along and keep it there to your find what works for you in terms of increasing the bpm.

Once the playing becomes natural with and without a metronome then you can speed it up a bit. It means that the thing you are trying to learn is becoming a fixed habit in your mind.
#7
It's admirable that you're trying to work from a book but this is a very dry approach to music. You really cannot beat finding yourself a good teacher. Playing guitar is such a complicated and nuanced skill. Several one-hour lessons with a good tutor could save you many months of frustration working from a book.
#9
Thanks everyone for the feedback. I will keep at the book but i will complement with starting from the begining of the justinguitar course, all slowly although i know that stuff, but whatever:P
#10
Hi Yureguitar,

If you have a reasonable ear, and a bit of patience, then a great tool is an application "Transcribe" by "seventhstring". This will let you loop, at whatever speed you want, tracks of your choice (mp3, wav ...), so you can get the nuances being applied.

Technique exercise (mechanical) help, but remember, when you improvise,it's rare to charge up and down a scale, literally (at least, it's rare withoout sounding like scale practise).

I suggest you encorporate learning a little about the effects produced by different intervals (which sound clashy, and which don't), and how to deal with the clashy ones ... as these are real life situations to be handled, to be (ab)used, and to have a lot of fun with.

Finally, make sure you don't believe that using scales means playing the scale from bottom to top and back. It has nothing to do with that, musically (only really for technique practise) ... a scale is primarily a palette of intervals to choose from, in an order that sounds good to you (and audience).

cheers, Jerry