#1
Hi Guys,

This is mainly a question for people new(ish) or revisiting the guitar.

What do hope to gain from a guitar learning method (be that via a teacher, a book, software, video ...)? What would your top 5 things be on your wish list where you would feel, once I can do these, "Yeah, I'm really start to get somewhere now!!". Is it playing some of a favourite solo? Jamming? Getting to grips with navigating the neck? Chords? What ever??

I remember when I first attended guitar lessons with a teacher,armed with a classical guitar (not that I wanted to play classical, but my parents wouldn't fork out for an electric (I was 10 years old then)).

But even then, I had a real fire to be able to play a few tunes and jam a bit with some of my musical friends without making a complete twat of myself (they were a bit older than me, but kind enough to put up with my attempts) ...

So, I'm full of enthusiasm and expectation, and what happens on my first lesson?

Here we go, Every Good Buy Deserves Fun (the dreaded score), and hey, after a few weeks, we got to do "How much is that doggy in the window". What a complete let down, turn off, you name it. I wanted to move on, get good(ish), have some vague clue, pull the chicks (I looked older than my age :-) ).

So, for the fun of it, what is your top 5 things youi'd like to achieve in a short time (say over a couple of months)? Be fascinating to see how common (or not) these are.

The name of the game: keep it short. Try and keep it to 5 points.

And then us guys that teach for a living will fix the world :-)

cheers, Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Dec 17, 2014,
#2
Nice initiative in creating this thread.

I think the first thing every new guitar player wants is to feel comfortable with the instrument. At least that was what I wanted when I started with my acoustic and would feel horrible wrist pains. My teacher never asked me if I was comfortable and never really taught me to play in a relaxed way. I remember a girl telling me she gave up on the instrument because her fingers were too tense and she couldn't get the chords right because of that.

When I started I just wanted to play tunes I liked, but after I started to meet more people in town who would know how to play an instrument I just wanted to learn how to not screw a jam up and feel confident when I was playing with other people.

In the long run I felt a real lack in some creativity stimulation. My teacher would not really get me into training my ears and letting my heart speak through the guitar, he would just spend time teaching advanced theory that I would never use and would forget after a few hours.
Get your students to create something of their own. If you teaching them harmony, a certain scale, anything, force them to come with something original that uses what you're teaching them, like a homework. Get them to make arrangements, show them how you create your stuff, stop to analyze musical ideas and motifs with them. Most teachers end up trying to teach so much theory that students will often think everything is about scales, intervals, etc, teachers must show students that there's more to music and not let the students figure it out by themselves.
#3
Great response, and I agree with all your points, and especially getting some creativity flowing. There are definitely many small steps that can be taken to encourage this, adding in just enough theory for whatever that stage is. For example, with intervals, I'll teach these initially as an aid to remembering all that follows (scales, chords ...), and in parallel the different sonic qualities (dissonance, consonance) and hence safe landing points. But I also make it clear from day one that there is no such thing as a bum note ... just poor choice of where to go to next, and get the student to use his ears to pick this up.

Surely there are more of you out there with suggestions on what you'd like to see offered??

cheers, Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Dec 18, 2014,
#4
i just want to be deep behind enemy lines of the frontline of theory.

I have already noticed the major gains in learning more than just major and minor chords, 7 are used everywhere as is dominant 7ths you realise the chords you struggled with come into those 80 percent of the time.

i also need to learn chord progressions and key scales, this is all basic stuff but im ditching everything after xmas to chase my dreams cause i have so many good ideas i cant flesh out due to lack of understanding.

After i have a good grasp on chord voicings which i want to learn first to open up possibilities further up the neck, and then learning key chord scales im going to purely study solo techniques, brian may, page, gilmour, just study the licks and short shape patterns in order to spice up my soloing.
#5
Quote by jerrykramskoy
Hi Guys,

This is mainly a question for people new(ish) or revisiting the guitar.

What do hope to gain from a guitar learning method (be that via a teacher, a book, software, video ...)? What would your top 5 things be on your wish list where you would feel, once I can do these, "Yeah, I'm really start to get somewhere now!!". Is it playing some of a favourite solo? Jamming? Getting to grips with navigating the neck? Chords? What ever??

I remember when I first attended guitar lessons with a teacher,armed with a classical guitar (not that I wanted to play classical, but my parents wouldn't fork out for an electric (I was 10 years old then)).

But even then, I had a real fire to be able to play a few tunes and jam a bit with some of my musical friends without making a complete twat of myself (they were a bit older than me, but kind enough to put up with my attempts) ...

So, I'm full of enthusiasm and expectation, and what happens on my first lesson?

Here we go, Every Good Buy Deserves Fun (the dreaded score), and hey, after a few weeks, we got to do "How much is that doggy in the window". What a complete let down, turn off, you name it. I wanted to move on, get good(ish), have some vague clue, pull the chicks (I looked older than my age :-) ).

So, for the fun of it, what is your top 5 things youi'd like to achieve in a short time (say over a couple of months)? Be fascinating to see how common (or not) these are.

The name of the game: keep it short. Try and keep it to 5 points.

And then us guys that teach for a living will fix the world :-)

cheers, Jerry


What to gain?

Knowledge and experience applied to the collected bunch of habits in the guitar skills department of my mind. Whenever I ad new stuff to it regardless of what it is when it becomes a stored habit in my subconscious mind then I know that bit more which give satisfaction in a way.

My basic take is just play what you want and improve your weak spots. That how it always have been.

I have know that I if take the time it needs and give any material the attention/focus etc. then I will at some point get it down regardless of hard it seems to be. I know what I want and to get there it needs the practise.

For a long time I always loved some Yngwie stuff and I am getting my skills to that level to be able to pull it off. Difficult? No just taking the time going over everything to get the notes clean and accurate at the desired speed.

I know that I can always get something out and improvise my way through anything to a point.

My first lessons?

I did not know anything at all as to what and where to go. I got a brand new Jasmine S60 acustic and well I guess I have to take lessons to learn how to play it?

I did come across the song smoke on the water and took it to my teacher though. He showed me the riff of the low E. I guess he did know the right way in G.

But anyway the few licks he taught me I can still remember so it was not that bad. The whole time I was just clueless guitar wise.

Things changed to the electric a year later and it went from there. By 1991 I got my first electric Applause Stratocaster and 2 TAB books: Kill'em'all + Black album.

So thats my 5 points though not in points. I keep my mind open on what to achieve guitar playing wise and learn it when I desire to do so.
#6
This is an interesting question you pose!

I am not sure I can come up with 5 points... Although I still feel like a "newbie" at times, I have been playing while so I cannot remember my specific goals for the first few months of playing.

Ultimately my goal and purpose for picking up the guitar was to be able to express myself in the moment using my instrument. If I had to break this down, I would say improvising, composing, and jamming (I kind of see all three of these things as the same thing though).

This however is by no means a pursuit that can be accomplished in the matter of a few months though. The longer I have played guitar and the deeper into the pursuit of expressing myself with the guitar I have gotten, the more I have learned that this is more of journey than it is a goal. I have come to realize that this pursuit is a lifelong pursuit with no end.

If I could go back 6 years in time and play a song to myself, the younger me would say that I have accomplished my goal, however today I feel like I have a long way to go... My vision for being able to express myself on the guitar is evolving as fast as I am progressing
#7
Quote by apbluegrass
This is an interesting question you pose!

I am not sure I can come up with 5 points... Although I still feel like a "newbie" at times, I have been playing while so I cannot remember my specific goals for the first few months of playing.

Ultimately my goal and purpose for picking up the guitar was to be able to express myself in the moment using my instrument. If I had to break this down, I would say improvising, composing, and jamming (I kind of see all three of these things as the same thing though).

This however is by no means a pursuit that can be accomplished in the matter of a few months though. The longer I have played guitar and the deeper into the pursuit of expressing myself with the guitar I have gotten, the more I have learned that this is more of journey than it is a goal. I have come to realize that this pursuit is a lifelong pursuit with no end.

If I could go back 6 years in time and play a song to myself, the younger me would say that I have accomplished my goal, however today I feel like I have a long way to go... My vision for being able to express myself on the guitar is evolving as fast as I am progressing


I absolutely relate to you on your last paragraph. I can play pretty good now (by my own standards), but I, as you, see this as something that just reaches out into the future .. the more I know, the more I realise there is to know (or at least to try). That's the whole beauty of music, I guess.

Thank you for replying!

cheers, Jerry
#8
Quote by anders.jorgense
What to gain?

Knowledge and experience applied to the collected bunch of habits in the guitar skills department of my mind. Whenever I ad new stuff to it regardless of what it is when it becomes a stored habit in my subconscious mind then I know that bit more which give satisfaction in a way.

My basic take is just play what you want and improve your weak spots. That how it always have been.

I have know that I if take the time it needs and give any material the attention/focus etc. then I will at some point get it down regardless of hard it seems to be. I know what I want and to get there it needs the practise.

For a long time I always loved some Yngwie stuff and I am getting my skills to that level to be able to pull it off. Difficult? No just taking the time going over everything to get the notes clean and accurate at the desired speed.

I know that I can always get something out and improvise my way through anything to a point.

My first lessons?

I did not know anything at all as to what and where to go. I got a brand new Jasmine S60 acustic and well I guess I have to take lessons to learn how to play it?

I did come across the song smoke on the water and took it to my teacher though. He showed me the riff of the low E. I guess he did know the right way in G.

But anyway the few licks he taught me I can still remember so it was not that bad. The whole time I was just clueless guitar wise.

Things changed to the electric a year later and it went from there. By 1991 I got my first electric Applause Stratocaster and 2 TAB books: Kill'em'all + Black album.

So thats my 5 points though not in points. I keep my mind open on what to achieve guitar playing wise and learn it when I desire to do so.


Hey Anders,
Thanks for your insiight. So, my holy grail is how can things be made more accessible, and less "mysterious" to folk wanting to learn more,without having to engage in the "whole 9 yards"? I keep on thinking (or rather seeing) that music education (as school / college) isn't cutting it ... I'm not including private teachers here, as it's plain to me that there are many, including you bunch of nutters (and me) here on UG that try our best to speed up the process of transferring knowledge on.

I especially think your point about dipping into what you want to learn when you feel you need has a lot of substance here. Again, I think it shouldn't be an expectation that the student must go through learning an entire language (the music score) to be able to dip in and out of the more important language (music)

cheers, Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Dec 18, 2014,
#9
Just starting to get some really interesting insights here. And big thanks to you guys that have contributed so far.

As for everyone else ... don't be shy!! Please make your thoughts known ... it's fascinating ... and there's no right or wrong ... just your view of how things could be!! I know loads of people peruse this particular forum, and I'm sure there's a lot of folk that maybe wish things could be better!!

If you've had some sort of tuition, or just struggled by yourself, and found it hard, or worse, got put off, what do YOU guys want to see available, that you reckon makes life way simpler / more fun, for you to start reaching your goals as a guitarist, or at least see yourself making successful strides down that path. This is incredibly important. The guitar is an amazing instrument, and music is one of the biggest conversations.

C'mon ... speak up!!

cheers, Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Dec 18, 2014,
#10
My goal has not really changed. +Be completely fluent on the guitar.

I want to play and express musical ideas as easily as I speak. and I want to comprehend the musical ideas I hear as easily as I can follow a conversation.

It's my ultimate goal.

For quite some time I haven't been practicing properly and have only just gotten back into structured practices. I have set some musical goals over the next few months breaking my practice into the following six aspects:
  • singing
  • ear training (+transcribing)
  • finger mechanics / technique exercises
  • learning new songs
  • composition
  • jamming/improvising - having fun


For most of those I have a structured course of exercises that I'm working through.

However my goal is not to master X number of exercisesl, nor play 16th notes at Xbpms, nor to learn certain songs, nor improve my vocal range to X octaves. My goals are not anything like that. My goals are about discipline, diligence, and commitment. i.e. putting in the work.

Basically I have a daily goal, a weekly goal, and a three month goal.

I am logging my time in a journal. Each aspect of my practice earns a tick every day it is completed for a minimum of ten minutes. At the end of each week I'll average my time over that week for each aspect and give myself a tick for each aspect in which I averaged more than 30mins per day.

In three months (90 days) I will measure my success. My goal is to achieve 100% but will still be happy if I get >90%. Keeping in mind that averaging 30 mins in each aspect would mean averaging 3 hrs practice per day. For some this may be easy to accomplish, for others this amount of time might be a challenge. It's about setting something I think is achievable for me.

So my measurement of success is my dedication to practicing. This way I'm not pressuring myself to be constantly moving on from one exercise to the next before I'm ready in order to achieve a timeline. I can work at my own pace and give myself as much time as I need to accomplish each exercise before moving on to the next.

It's not about achieving certain levels of ability within a set amount of time - it's about putting in the work. I figure if I do that the rest will come.

So daily goal = minimum 10 mins per day for each of the six aspects listed above.
Weekly goal = average o 30 mins per day (total 3.5hrsminimum spent on each of the six aspects)
90 day goal 100% achievement of the above two.

I might tweak it as I go to make it more or less challenging, or maybe give myself bonus points for achieving more challenging goals in order to allow me to make up any days I might miss for reasons I have no control over.
Si
#11
Thanks, 20Tigers. That's a very sound approach (I did the same a lot, but currently have less time to play ... some other things have higher priority for the next couple of months or so. But I still keep my hand in, musically)

Music, and guitar in particular, really is proof that you get out what you're prepared to put in.

Artificial deadlines may not help if it means rushing and not absorbing whatever is being studied.

In terms of progress across elapsed time, I do think a lot more could be done to get newbies on the first few rungs of the ladder, for their own satisfaction, and I'm absolutely certain that that has nothing to do with learning EGBDF or FACE as the first experience!!

cheers, Jerry
#12
Quote by jerrykramskoy
Hey Anders,
Thanks for your insiight. So, my holy grail is how can things be made more accessible, and less "mysterious" to folk wanting to learn more,without having to engage in the "whole 9 yards"? I keep on thinking (or rather seeing) that music education (as school / college) isn't cutting it ... I'm not including private teachers here, as it's plain to me that there are many, including you bunch of nutters (and me) here on UG that try our best to speed up the process of transferring knowledge on.

I especially think your point about dipping into what you want to learn when you feel you need has a lot of substance here. Again, I think it shouldn't be an expectation that the student must go through learning an entire language (the music score) to be able to dip in and out of the more important language (music)

cheers, Jerry


Well with the hindsight of 20 + years of playing whatever came to mind I can vote for the key thing being awareness of who you are and what you can achieve.

Not just as a guitar player but as a person. You can be anything you want it is just a matter of really understanding that important bit.

I can strongly recommend to study human potential like Bob Proctor some of your time.

With guitar there are no set rules on what you need to learn and thank god for that! That means you can be the master utilizing your power with the tools you prefer for what you want to accomplish in the end.

The universial law is that the more you put in the more you get back. With guitar all things takes time.

As to what makes it a success is a a factor of songs and marketing. You can write the greatest material the world has yet to hear but if you do not know marketing how are you going to get it people to hear it?

Then it is a matter of connecting with the right people in the industry to help you further.

Musical education? Yes if you are playing violin or piano in a orchestra or something.

How big are so called schooled music where the musicians know everything there ever could be learned?

Do you need an education for playing in the streets? That can happen if you do not write the songs and get them out.

Now with that said some education on how songs can be constructed would always be essential to know and some time spend on learning how to actually market your music yourself.

Otherwise you might end up alone with your guitar and the time spend so many years later.
#13
Quote by jerrykramskoy
In terms of progress across elapsed time, I do think a lot more could be done to get newbies on the first few rungs of the ladder, for their own satisfaction, and I'm absolutely certain that that has nothing to do with learning EGBDF or FACE as the first experience!!

The first thing that they should be shown is how to play some songs.

People are always shown a few easy basslines, but also need to be challenged from day one. Something they have to work on for a while and will see daily progress. Not something they learn in a week and move on to the next thing then the next thing etc.

I've met so many people that can play smoke on the water but that's all they can play, or maybe a handful of similar songs (stand by me) etc.

One of the first songs I learned was Stairway to Heaven - because I wanted to learn it. And with concentration I could make my fingers do the right things and day by day I got better and better at it and I could see improvement in my playing. Babe I'm Gonna Leave You was another one. Creep by Radiohead - playing barre chords for the first time for a whole song was a killer on the hand.

But it was songs not theory, not exercises, not chords or scales that got me going. Those things came later and as a consequence of learning songs. And they came with a purpose at a point when I was interested in knowing and understanding more about the guitar.
Si
#14
Quote by 20Tigers
The first thing that they should be shown is how to play some songs.

People are always shown a few easy basslines, but also need to be challenged from day one. Something they have to work on for a while and will see daily progress. Not something they learn in a week and move on to the next thing then the next thing etc.

I've met so many people that can play smoke on the water but that's all they can play, or maybe a handful of similar songs (stand by me) etc.

One of the first songs I learned was Stairway to Heaven - because I wanted to learn it. And with concentration I could make my fingers do the right things and day by day I got better and better at it and I could see improvement in my playing. Babe I'm Gonna Leave You was another one. Creep by Radiohead - playing barre chords for the first time for a whole song was a killer on the hand.

But it was songs not theory, not exercises, not chords or scales that got me going. Those things came later and as a consequence of learning songs. And they came with a purpose at a point when I was interested in knowing and understanding more about the guitar.



Good to hear mate I really enjoyed reading your posts.
#15
Well I been learning 2 months now and its not easy, I just go over all my chords and try playing some easy songs. Maybe next year I will be better lol.i partice half hour a day I wish I had more time
#16
^That's good though. Half and hour a day is good if you are consistent with it on a daily basis you'll make progress.

They say "Difficult things take a long time, impossible things take a little longer."

Confucious said "It does not matter how slowly you go, so long as you do not stop"

Or the quote at the gym today seemed rather appropriate:

"Don’t let the fear of the time it will take to accomplish something stand in the way of your doing it. -The time will pass anyway." (Earl Nightingale)
Si
#17
Quote by anders.jorgense
Well with the hindsight of 20 + years of playing whatever came to mind I can vote for the key thing being awareness of who you are and what you can achieve.

Not just as a guitar player but as a person. You can be anything you want it is just a matter of really understanding that important bit.

I can strongly recommend to study human potential like Bob Proctor some of your time.

With guitar there are no set rules on what you need to learn and thank god for that! That means you can be the master utilizing your power with the tools you prefer for what you want to accomplish in the end.

The universial law is that the more you put in the more you get back. With guitar all things takes time.

As to what makes it a success is a a factor of songs and marketing. You can write the greatest material the world has yet to hear but if you do not know marketing how are you going to get it people to hear it?

Then it is a matter of connecting with the right people in the industry to help you further.

Musical education? Yes if you are playing violin or piano in a orchestra or something.

How big are so called schooled music where the musicians know everything there ever could be learned?

Do you need an education for playing in the streets? That can happen if you do not write the songs and get them out.

Now with that said some education on how songs can be constructed would always be essential to know and some time spend on learning how to actually market your music yourself.

Otherwise you might end up alone with your guitar and the time spend so many years later.



Anders,

I unintentionally overstressed the formal (school) education part. So, I very much agree with your reply.

While I know that formal music education is failing here in UK (and government stats show it), what I am far more concerned is what guitar teachers (outside of school) use to give their students the most sense of "yeah, I'm getting there", and likewise, what the student expects ... and I'm not just restricting this to pure beginners.

I'm also wondering how people feel, who've played for awhile (maybe years) and run up against a brick wall, and what their top 5 points would be that they reckong will move them on again.

cheers, Jerry
#18
Quote by jerrykramskoy
Hi Guys,

This is mainly a question for people new(ish) or revisiting the guitar.

What do hope to gain from a guitar learning method (be that via a teacher, a book, software, video ...)? What would your top 5 things be on your wish list where you would feel, once I can do these, "Yeah, I'm really start to get somewhere now!!". Is it playing some of a favourite solo? Jamming? Getting to grips with navigating the neck? Chords? What ever??

I remember when I first attended guitar lessons with a teacher,armed with a classical guitar (not that I wanted to play classical, but my parents wouldn't fork out for an electric (I was 10 years old then)).

But even then, I had a real fire to be able to play a few tunes and jam a bit with some of my musical friends without making a complete twat of myself (they were a bit older than me, but kind enough to put up with my attempts) ...

So, I'm full of enthusiasm and expectation, and what happens on my first lesson?

Here we go, Every Good Buy Deserves Fun (the dreaded score), and hey, after a few weeks, we got to do "How much is that doggy in the window". What a complete let down, turn off, you name it. I wanted to move on, get good(ish), have some vague clue, pull the chicks (I looked older than my age :-) ).

So, for the fun of it, what is your top 5 things youi'd like to achieve in a short time (say over a couple of months)? Be fascinating to see how common (or not) these are.

The name of the game: keep it short. Try and keep it to 5 points.

And then us guys that teach for a living will fix the world :-)

cheers, Jerry


so IN YOUR VERY 1ST LESSON he tried to teach you to read and you're like "booooooring" this teacher must not know what he's doing?

I come across kids like that all the time. As a teacher you think, well okay I need to give the kid something he can relate to, something to get him fired up. How about maybe an easy power chord riff…… what you get? "that's too hard…….. my fingers hurt."

or you get "how come your not teaching my kid to read "????

or "all my teacher ever did was show me songs, I wish he would have taught me some theory and how to read"

Sometimes instead of asking ourselves "what do I want to get out of my teacher" we oughta ask things like " what am I willing to put into it" and " do I have realistic expectations"

I find that alot of people have these goals like "I want to learn to improvise", but they are unwilling to go through the process of learning the necessary fundamentals.
shred is gaudy music
#19
Quote by GuitarMunky
so IN YOUR VERY 1ST LESSON he tried to teach you to read and you're like "booooooring" this teacher must not know what he's doing?

I come across kids like that all the time. As a teacher you think, well okay I need to give the kid something he can relate to, something to get him fired up. How about maybe an easy power chord riff…… what you get? "that's too hard…….. my fingers hurt."

or you get "how come your not teaching my kid to read "????

or "all my teacher ever did was show me songs, I wish he would have taught me some theory and how to read"

Sometimes instead of asking ourselves "what do I want to get out of my teacher" we oughta ask things like " what am I willing to put into it" and " do I have realistic expectations"

I find that alot of people have these goals like "I want to learn to improvise", but they are unwilling to go through the process of learning the necessary fundamentals.


I believe all your problems would be solved if you'd just sit and talk with your students. Discover what they want to achieve and explain them all the process behind getting them there. My first teacher and I would talk about my progress and what I wanted to achieve from time to time, though these talks were not very common they would always make me want to do more. If it were not for these talks I would also not be playing an electric guitar today and would have probably gave up on music.

Your students probably are "unwilling to go through the process of learning the necessary fundamentals" because they didn't know there were fundamentals and no one told them there were. They thought you'd just say do this and do that and they'd be doing it with ease very quickly. Most people know absolutely nothing about guitar before they start studying it, I still remember that in my first lesson I held my guitar like a left-handed, even though I am right-handed (gladly my teacher fixed that before I played my first note).
#20
guitarmonkey, mp8andgrade

I've been lucky, I guess, as I've taught people that are already good players, but light on the theory side of things, and some light on the navigation side of things also ... so I haven't had to address how to play a power chord, and so on.

For sure, there is an onus to set expectations, and I never had those set for me by my first teacher.

And that raises the question of teacher leading student, or teacher responding to student (and add in parents to that, maybe). Of course, it's a challenging balancing act here.

Further thoughts? What is this right balance in your views (either as teacher, or as student)? Again, what would those top 5 points be?

cheers, Jerry
#21
Quote by mp8andrade
I believe all your problems would be solved if you'd just sit and talk with your students. Discover what they want to achieve and explain them all the process behind getting them there.

Your students probably are "unwilling to go through the process of learning the necessary fundamentals" because they didn't know there were fundamentals and no one told them there were.

They thought you'd just say do this and do that and they'd be doing it with ease very quickly. Most people know absolutely nothing about guitar before they start studying it, I still remember that in my first lesson I held my guitar like a left-handed, even though I am right-handed (gladly my teacher fixed that before I played my first note).




How long have you been teaching for?

how many students do you have?


I wish it was as simple as just "sitting and talking…explaining the process"
but it's not. Many people simply don't listen….. or only listen to things they want to hear….
or listen and say "yeah I get It I'm gonna practice all the time"…. but then don't.

Quote by jerrykramskoy
guitarmonkey, mp8andgrade


And that raises the question of teacher leading student, or teacher responding to student (and add in parents to that, maybe). Of course, it's a challenging balancing act here.

Further thoughts? What is this right balance in your views (either as teacher, or as student)? Again, what would those top 5 points be?

cheers, Jerry


There is no ideal right balance, because your dealing with different people that have different goals, different personalities, different amounts of dedication, different ages, different tastes in music, different attitudes, different amount of experience...…ect.

I find that you have to approach each individual as such. What works or is appropriate for one person, isn't always right for the next. And It usually takes more than 1 lesson to get to know people.

so if in your 1st lesson your teacher shows you basic stuff like how to read notes, how to hold your pick properly, and sit with good posture, trust that what they're teaching you is important, and assume that rocking out and looking cool for your friends comes later….. and realize that expecting that to happen in your 1st lesson was your mistake.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 22, 2014,