#1
I want to be able to play any chords without needing to pull up the chord shape every time. I know the notes on the fretboard quite well. I also know how chords are constructed. I can construct chords but it just takes a long time to tell my fingers where to place them on the fret board. It would seem faster to just learn the shapes. How do i get faster at this?
#3
Quote by Paleo Pete
3 words.

Practice

Practice

Practice

That's not helpful. At all.

TS: what might help is a kind of hybrid approach to chords, where you learn some common shapes and learn how to alter those to become more complex or unusual chords.

If you take something like a basic E major shaped barre chord you can get a wealth of interesting sounds by moving one or two of your fingers to other places; move your pinky up two frets and you get a majadd9 chord for example.

You can get a lot of milage out of that and ideas like it using other shapes as well. The important thing is that you know what you're doing though; randomly moving your fingers is a good way to explore new sounds but if you want to learn chords systematically then knowing what you're doing is crucial.
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#4
Quote by Darkn3ss99
I want to be able to play any chords without needing to pull up the chord shape every time. I know the notes on the fretboard quite well. I also know how chords are constructed. I can construct chords but it just takes a long time to tell my fingers where to place them on the fret board. It would seem faster to just learn the shapes. How do i get faster at this?
What would help here is you telling us how long you've been playing.

If the issue is you're just beginning, then learning common chords by shape instead of theoretically building them as you go, (IMO), is the best way to go forward.

As Zaphod said, lifting a finger here, and putting one down over there to alter a chord through theoretical knowledge is a good way to expand your vocabulary. But this would come after you can hit an A barre chord @5th fret, (and most other common voices), automatically.

If we're talking an end game where you know 12,000 chords by heart, because you want to be the most articulate jazz guitarist ever, probably locking yourself in the attic and practicing 8 hours of the day would be necessary.

So, shapes, theory, AND practice, all go together, you just need to find the right mix to fit your personal goals.
#5
You need to practice and learn the shapes. You can get those from a book, or build them yourself. Start with the basic ones. Start with I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-viio. or CAGED, how those shapes are built according to chord nomenclature, and learn variations of those.

What you want takes a while. There are quite a few chords out there. Start basic, and go more complex. That's generally what I'd do. I could show you more, a more precise way, and organize it to make it easy it to see, and show you ways to learn these in the most efficient and enjoyable way. But I can't do that in a forum post.

To learn what you want to learn in the quickest and most efficient way, you need a teacher that knows what they are doing, and they need to know you also.

There is a logic that makes it easy. You don't have to study every chord like how you find them presented in a chord book. It's like learning to spell. You don't need to memorize every word point blank. There is some of that, but there is a logic to it also. Not just from a theory standpoint, but from a guitar standpoint, the way the guitar is configured and whatnot.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Dec 20, 2014,
#6
Practice thats what i do i been playing for 2 months my chord changes will get better