#1
im learning to play in particular keys but i also want to deviate from the key im in. is that ok? are you suposed to at least start and end in a particular key or what?
#2
there are no rules to music
will someone carry me across ten thousand miles under the silence
#3
As long as it makes since/fits the mood you're trying to express it's fine. If it just sounds like you have no idea what you're doing then I recommend that you pretty much stick to the key most of the time.
#4
Keys are used as structure guidelines. It is totally okay to deviate (and recommendable if you know what you are doing). If you don't know what you are doing it probably will sound sloppy and unorganized, but as long as you're okay with that at first it's a good idea. You should still continue to learn how to play in key, but it's also a good idea to learn when and how to expand beyond those basic notes. The trick is to make notes that aren't in the basic key sound like they belong.

If you are jamming with friends I'd recommend staying within your comfort levels until you are ready to expand, keys are especially helpful for learners, like training wheels. Even so, even the great composers understood the keys and how to manipulate them. They were also masters at using theory beyond the 7 notes of traditional western major/ minor keys.

Long answer short: Yes. Learn what every note sounds like in relation to another and you will go a long way in your learning. If you choose to learn more theory you'll learn why certain combinations sound the way they do, and will be able to describe it by ear.
#5
Watch this vid, it's mainly about chromatic fills but he talks about outside playing as well:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z9Hg4JdwMMg
It's perfectly fine as long as it's justified. If you can stumble away from the key but land back on your feet (preferably on an important beat of the bar), then, as Guthrie Govan puts it, you're immune from criticism. Just try not to deviate for too long however, playing in a wrong key is like adding suspense, if you use it appropriately it can make landing back in key that much cooler, overdo it however and it'll just sound jarring.
#6
Quote by Jimjambanx
Watch this vid, it's mainly about chromatic fills but he talks about outside playing as well:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z9Hg4JdwMMg
It's perfectly fine as long as it's justified. If you can stumble away from the key but land back on your feet (preferably on an important beat of the bar), then, as Guthrie Govan puts it, you're immune from criticism. Just try not to deviate for too long however, playing in a wrong key is like adding suspense, if you use it appropriately it can make landing back in key that much cooler, overdo it however and it'll just sound jarring.


You can also modify the key by changing, removing, or adding notes as part of the "key" per se. They technically are out of the key, but within the context of the song/ piece fit within the language. This can be as simple as raising the seventh into a harmonic minor scale, or adding a tritone and minor second and treat them like they are part of the scale/ key. It's all about whether it fits what you are trying to say.

The language of music is extremely flexible!
#7
Quote by Baby Joel
there are no rules to music

Except for the ones you set yourself.

Playing outside of the key is a good idea as long as it works with the music. If you can't change the chords behind your playing, you probably can't add deviation for very long and your outside notes will mostly be used as grace notes. If you can alter the chords behind your playing, you can deviate with no limits.

I wouldn't change the chords for pop-like music, but I'd add quick, grace-note like deviations to a solo. I would alter chords for complex music, like Jazz/Fusion, so that I could deviate extensively with my solo.

It's all about how much the song's styling will allow deviation.
#8
It's a good idea to make sure you're comfy within a key, and bringing out its tonality ... because a frequent approach to outside playing is playing within a key bringing out its tonality ... but that tonality is different to the one being used in the backing.

cheers, Jerry