#1
Hey guys,

I just got my first recording interface which I'm using to record my guitar through an amplifier into a microphone. I've recorded a few samples and I'm having difficulty getting a full, loud signal. All I've gotten so far is a middy and far-away sound, even though the mic is only an inch from the speaker and pointed pretty close to the cone. Anyone have any recording tips? Would help greatly. TY
#2
What equipment are you using exactly?
Interface/amp/mic/speaker...

Are you double tracking the guitar parts?
How is the mic placed exactly?
Is your your amp gain lower than usual?
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
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Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
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#3
Mic placement is huge when recording anything, especially guitar amps. Try moving the mic around in relation to the cone. I usually use a flashlight to see where the speaker cone is, and move the mic until I get the sound I want. Usually I start about an inch away from the speaker (which is where you're at now) and pointed straight at the place where the dust cap meets the cone. Generally speaking, moving the mic closer to the dust cap gets you a brighter tone, and vice versa.

As for the loudness, that doesn't really have anything to do with the amp settings or mic placement. Just make sure you are getting a strong signal coming into the interface, and you will be fine. During mixing you can adjust the volume of the guitar in relation to other instruments.

And as Spambot asked, what equipment are you using?
#4
A Vox Amp w/two Celestion Greenback speakers, a Shure sm58 microphone, Scarlett 2i2 interface, GarageBand as software and my computer is a Mac laptop.

I don't intend to double track the guitars.

I have the mic. an inch away from the speaker cloth and half an inch to the left of the cone. I moved it around until I got a decent balance of highs and lows.

As for amp volume, I keep it decently high, whatever i think sounds good.
#5
Quote by chaosmoon
Mic placement is huge when recording anything, especially guitar amps. Try moving the mic around in relation to the cone. I usually use a flashlight to see where the speaker cone is, and move the mic until I get the sound I want. Usually I start about an inch away from the speaker (which is where you're at now) and pointed straight at the place where the dust cap meets the cone. Generally speaking, moving the mic closer to the dust cap gets you a brighter tone, and vice versa.

As for the loudness, that doesn't really have anything to do with the amp settings or mic placement. Just make sure you are getting a strong signal coming into the interface, and you will be fine. During mixing you can adjust the volume of the guitar in relation to other instruments.

And as Spambot asked, what equipment are you using?


Ah yes, the interface volume. The thing is I chose to turn the channel volume down just enough so that the signal wouldn't turn red (which I imagine would distort the signal, right?).
#6
Quote by andersondb7
A Vox Amp
A pathfinder ran into a cab with greenbacks or an AC30?
Being specific helps in this situation.
Quote by andersondb7
I don't intend to double track the guitars.
Why?
Also what are you recording and what effect do you wanna get?
Quote by andersondb7
I moved it around until I got a decent balance of highs and lows.
Then if this is good what do you exactly mean by " I'm having difficulty getting a full, loud signal."
And how are the amps settings (EQ, gain, reverb)?
Quote by andersondb7
Ah yes, the interface volume. The thing is I chose to turn the channel volume down just enough so that the signal wouldn't turn red (which I imagine would distort the signal, right?).
Yes the red led means the input's clipping.

Is the gain knob on the interface fully counterclockwise?
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#7
Quote by Spambot_2
A pathfinder ran into a cab with greenbacks or an AC30?
Being specific helps in this situation.
Why?
Also what are you recording and what effect do you wanna get?
Then if this is good what do you exactly mean by " I'm having difficulty getting a full, loud signal."
And how are the amps settings (EQ, gain, reverb)?
Yes the red led means the input's clipping.

Is the gain knob on the interface fully counterclockwise?


It's Vox AC15c2 2x12.

The style of music I'm recording, which in this case is a Strokes song, doesn't require any double tracking. I only want to get the most clear and natural sound out of the mic so that it sounds the same on my computer as the amp does in person.

The problem I'm having is I'm not getting enough volume, the tone I'm getting is not bad, but it'd be so much better with more volume.

I'm not using any reverb, I want to get a crystal clear signal. I want to record both clean distorted sounds, pretty much any guitar sound I might desire. The EQ is fine, I spend a lot of time tampering with it trying to get the best sounds I can.

No, I turned down the volume on the interface to keep it from clipping, I'm not sure how to get the volume without distorting the signal.
#8
Since you have a good level (volume) signal coming from the mic, the next place to get volume would be from garage band. Turn down whatever else you have playing (drums, bass, vocals, etc) until they are balanced with the guitar, then turn the whole thing up. Try using a compressor to help reduce transients and peaks so you can get it a little louder.
#9
Quote by andersondb7
The style of music I'm recording, which in this case is a Strokes song, doesn't require any double tracking.
You may wanna try that anyway - I listened to a couple songs from them only and one did use double tracked guitars.
Quote by andersondb7
I only want to get the most clear and natural sound out of the mic so that it sounds the same on my computer as the amp does in person.
To get the same sound you're hearing in real life you'll need to spend more money - SM58's are good but it's not gonna get you a pristine, natural sound.
Quote by andersondb7
The problem I'm having is I'm not getting enough volume, the tone I'm getting is not bad, but it'd be so much better with more volume.
Meaning that if you turn the gain up on the focusrite it clips, but if you turn it down just enough not to have your signal clipped the result isn't high enough in volume?

If that's the case you need to turn up the gain in garageband, or turn down the rest.
Using a compressor would likely help but it's gonna give you an effect you may not like.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.