#1
In my practice routine, I do a variation of runs on the major scale. I memorize the position of all the roots, similar notes, and try to randomly call out scale degrees. I find it very difficult to make real progress in familiarizing, and I thought analyzing songs and observing the patterns on these songs would help. Can you please recommend forgiving major key songs where I can do this? Also, additional tips in familiarizing the scale degrees, or what to do after, is welcome.
#2
I've written some lessons on intervals that hopefully address your scale degree familiarisation.

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/drastically_reduce_learning_time_with_intervals_part_3.html ... follow links back to earlier lessons.

Randomisation may actually be a bad thing for you ... it'll work to put pressure on you to find a given degree, but that's it ... it will also destroy the sense of a melody coming from the scale and its key.

Melody doesn't work like that.

So you need to understand which degrees (intervals) set up expectations of resolution, and which don't. The latter are 1, 3, 5 of the scale. Then, in order of setting up expectation, from weak to strong, you have 6, 2, 4, 7 (7 strongly resolves to nearest 1).

These expectations are then further strengthened or weakened by emphasisng the degree ... how? Play louder, hold note longer, place at top of a part of melody, or at bass. use rhyhmic stress, syncopation ... etc

Then all of this is set in the context of creating phrases, often repeated and adjusted slighltly, giving more memorability and structure to a tune (if that's what you want).

What sort of tunes you into? No matter what, listen to the vocal, and notice how they do what I'm talking about above. (This is not just a major scale thing).

cheers, Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Dec 22, 2014,
#3
Quote by jerrykramskoy
Thank you, sir. The lessons look great. I tried to tackle intervals several times by memorizing exactly how many semitones, or one by one the degrees in the 7 box positions.. but not like your approach where you really break down the shapes per interval, and focus on the most important parts. It sounds like very good approach, I'll work on it, thank you. I am familiar with how scales resolve or bring up expectations but I learned it in piano. It is frustrating not to see "piano keys" in the fret board so I was trying this approach [ http://egalo.com/2012/06/09/notes-on-the-guitar-fretboard-visualization/ ] I am currently trying to note read classical sheet music using intervals on the fret board and I am quite slow. To answer your last question, I enjoy listening to neo-classical/ technical metal (and sometimes cliche thrash) .
#4
Quote by reliqua
Thank you, sir. The lessons look great. I tried to tackle intervals several times by memorizing exactly how many semitones, or one by one the degrees in the 7 box positions.. but not like your approach where you really break down the shapes per interval, and focus on the most important parts. It sounds like very good approach, I'll work on it, thank you. I am familiar with how scales resolve or bring up expectations but I learned it in piano. It is frustrating not to see "piano keys" in the fret board so I was trying this approach [ http://egalo.com/2012/06/09/notes-on-the-guitar-fretboard-visualization/ ] I am currently trying to note read classical sheet music using intervals on the fret board and I am quite slow. To answer your last question, I enjoy listening to neo-classical/ technical metal (and sometimes cliche thrash) .


Let me know how you get on, really!

For neo-classical metal, you'll want to explore harmonic minor and phrygian.

Just seen that site you've used.

The author has put a lot of effort into it, and respect to him/her for that. If your main goal is sight-reading, then a strong knowledge of individual pitches is a must.

If you want to quickly understand what's what in scales and chords, then I believe you'll find using interval shapes much quicker and easier.

(I am a very slow reader, and almost never think in terms of note names, other than some original locating myself for the key).

cheers, Jerry