#1
Preparing Yourself and Your Band (If Applicable) For the Studio: A Primer



Purpose of this Primer:

The primary purpose of this primer is to be a principal source of high quality information for the Ultimate-Guitar recording community, specifically on the preparation for recording in a professional studio and the inner workings of a professional studio

Disclaimer: As music is an art form, all opinions expressed herein are exactly that. Recording and music in general are all very subjective, and as such many people have many differing opinions.

That being said, I have studied recording in school for several years, spent numerous hours in and out of professional studios, have had countless hours of conversation with countless industry professionals whom are personal friends, and even owned and operated my own studio.

My opinions are formed and forged on that experience. This does not mean “I know it all” or am 100% correct. There may be times and places within this primer where I am incorrect, and will gladly admit that and make corrections where needed. Please feel free to PM me with anything you feel should be corrected, rather than posting it in a reply to the thread. Also, I am open to collaboration with other users on this primer and future posts like it. PM me if you're interested.

Introduction:

Going into the studio can be very intimidating the first few times you do it, but don’t let that scare you off. Just ask someone who has recorded multiple times in studios. Anyone who has recorded more than a few times understands the process inside and out and has figured out little ways to better prepare themselves for day one in the studio. After all, most professional studios charge by the day (or hour) and we all know that time is measured in $$$ in the music industry. Hopefully this primer will help you prepare for your next sessions in the studio (first or not) and save you money and time.

(For those of you who have done it over and over, I’m sure it’s like clockwork now, but think back to the first few times you went into the studio. How much has your opinion changed on your own music as a result? How much more input do you allow a producer (or outsider) now? How much do your songs change from the day you walk in, to the time the record drops?)
Last edited by Brendan.Clace at Dec 22, 2014,
#7
Sounds like this will be a good informative thread. There are so many random postings about this subject it should be nice to have it all in one place. I worked as an engineer at two different studios for a few years (I was never an owner or part owner) and while almost every session has it's own stories, I'm sure you can help musicians who have never recorded in a pro studio. There are so many misconceptions out there and in the studio world where literally "time is money" any little bit of info could be a huge savings to first timers.
#8
Answering the "how much input is allowed from a producer" part...

This latest EP my band is just now putting out is really the first time we've had great ideas come from an outside source. If the engineer or someone else is willing to be the "extra member" of the band and add changes it's important to know that they have a similar sound in their head as your band does collectively. Someone who understands what the project is going for. Once that trust is built up between producer/engineer and artist has been achieved I think that is where real studio creativity becomes a reality and it makes the recording process worlds better than just going into a studio with "it's my way or the highway" attitude and being closed minded to new ideas with your music. Songs can take on a whole new life by the end of the studio sessions if they're allowed to and most importantly if the talent is there.

I think it shows in the end product.
#9
Quote by JBailey23
Answering the "how much input is allowed from a producer" part...

This latest EP my band is just now putting out is really the first time we've had great ideas come from an outside source. If the engineer or someone else is willing to be the "extra member" of the band and add changes it's important to know that they have a similar sound in their head as your band does collectively. Someone who understands what the project is going for. Once that trust is built up between producer/engineer and artist has been achieved I think that is where real studio creativity becomes a reality and it makes the recording process worlds better than just going into a studio with "it's my way or the highway" attitude and being closed minded to new ideas with your music. Songs can take on a whole new life by the end of the studio sessions if they're allowed to and most importantly if the talent is there.

I think it shows in the end product.



What you just described, is the difference between a producer and an engineer that calls them-self a producer. 100% spot on.
I've bought, sold, and traded more gear than I care to admit.