#1
Hi! I am wanting to learn all the notes of the fret board but I have terrible memory, is there any system for learning the notes or something to understand it more? I also want to get back into theory, is it totally necessary to know all the notes of the neck before I study theory?
#2
Quote by Frenetixx
Hi! I am wanting to learn all the notes of the fret board but I have terrible memory, is there any system for learning the notes or something to understand it more?


looking into 'intervals' may help you see some useful patterns

Quote by Frenetixx
I also want to get back into theory, is it totally necessary to know all the notes of the neck before I study theory?


no, not at all. if you want to try something out on your guitar you can just as easily use a chart of the fretboard to work it out.

i don't have the fretboard memorized. it's just not useful to me. but i do know frets 0 through 5 on the E and A string. from there i can work anything out, if i have to.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#3
Hi Frenetixx,

Interval shapes will definitely reduce the learning effort. Intervals underpin harmony and melody.

For me, learning entirely by note names of what's involved in a chord or scale is like pulling teeth, and has never helped me.

This may help you ... http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/drastically_reduce_learning_time_with_intervals_part_3.html

cheers, Jerry
#4
I think knowing the note names does help. But I don't think you need to be able to name all notes on all frets instantly to know theory. I can't do that (I need some time to think) but I would say I know theory pretty well.

I also think there are better ways to learn all the note names on the fretboard than just trying to memorize them all. At least that way seems really boring to me. I learned the notes on the two lowest strings by just playing lots of chords (because most of the time the root note of the chord is on either the A or E string). I think one way to learn all the note names on the fretboard is to use sheet music and play in different positions. That way you'll automatically learn the note names without really needing to just memorize them. And that way the notes get more meaning. Or you could just play lots of chords on different strings. That also helps. As I said, I learned the note names on the two lowest strings by playing chords. It just happened automatically.

This is why I like saying practice first, then theory. You'll learn theoretical things a lot easier if you do them in practice. You could learn the whole fretboard on paper if you wanted to but it would be really boring and I'm sure it would take a lot more time (or at least way more effort) than actually using the notes in practice.

^ And yeah, just learning note names is not that reasonable. I mean, the same note can sound way different in different contexts (for example C note in the key of A minor sounds like the minor third but in the key of F major it sounds like the perfect fifth - the note name doesn't really tell about the sound and that's why learning about intervals and keys is pretty important - it makes you understand the sound a lot easier which is the most important thing in music). But yeah, note names do help but you should also learn about intervals and scale degrees because they work in all keys and are more related to the sound than note names are (unless you have perfect pitch).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Dec 24, 2014,
#6
ok..no you do not have to know the note locations to learn theory..but in the study of theory you will learn the location of notes..it will take some time so be patient with the process..the goal of knowing the notes is how they relate to other notes..for forming chords..playing scales in intervals..melodic patterns and so on..remember the notes are in fixed position..they don't move..once you begin to see the patterns of how notes relate to each other-say the notes C and E-a major 3rd interval..you may begin to see chords-add a G note to the C and E..and you have a C major triad..as you become more comfortable with the learning process..you will discover the C major chord..and of course the notes C E G in more locations on the fretboard..and as you learn how notes relate and their locations..you will discover how chords relate and their locations..theory will teach you "chord scales" that will help you alot with this - and so much more..

play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Dec 25, 2014,
#7
Knowing the patterns is far more important than actually memorizing every note. Learn the patterns, and memorization of the notes will come naturally as you keep playing. If you asked me, "what note is the 9th fret of the B string?", I couldn't tell you off the top of my head. Once I look at the guitar for a second, I'll tell you it's a G#, but that doesn't even really matter. If I'm playing something in a key that uses that note, I'll hit it and play through it just fine, without being consciously aware at all times of exactly what note I'm playing.