#1
Sorry that I sound dumb, but how do you read chord and scale fretboard maps?

Thanks
Bands I like: Acceptance, Ivoryline, Mae, Coheed and Cambria, Breaking Benjamin, Megadeth, Trapt, Staind, Crossfade, and of course Rush!

Guitars: Schecter 2002 Diamond Series C-1
#2
Could you post an example?
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#3
Yeah an example would help big time.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#4
Here is an example:



Thanks
Bands I like: Acceptance, Ivoryline, Mae, Coheed and Cambria, Breaking Benjamin, Megadeth, Trapt, Staind, Crossfade, and of course Rush!

Guitars: Schecter 2002 Diamond Series C-1
#5
these type of grids make me nuts..even for experienced players they can be a pain..try and find some that just have ONE or two octave diagrams..search the net .. there are lots of them out there..they will be much easier to read and understand
play well

wolf
#6
Yeah, that's showing you every note in C minor in every location at once. That'll drive you insane.

Try breaking it up into positions and patterns. Start with one octave fingerings and move them around.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#7
Also note that they are a view of the fretboard as if you were right handed, sitting and holding the guitar ready to to play it and then laid the guitar down on your lap. So imagine the guitar is lying with the head of the guitar pointing to your left and the body of the guitar is on your right and you are looking down on the neck.

This means the thickest string - the low E string is on the bottom of diagram and the thinnest string -the high e - is on the top.

Each dot represents a note that is in the C minor scale. If you hold down the that string on that fret then you will play the note indicated. The red dots are the root notes of the scale.
Si
#8
The numbers are fret numbers, the horizontal lines are strings and the vertical lines are frets. The lowest line is the low E string. The dots that have note names inside them are notes that belong to the C minor scale (though there's one mistake in that picture - it uses sharps instead of flats and C minor should have flats in it). The red dots are root notes, in this case C (C minor is a minor scale with C as the root note).

As you can see, the C minor scale can be played all over the fretboard. The scale has 7 notes (C D Eb F G Ab Bb) that repeat in different octaves and different positions.

The picture is not really that handy because memorizing all that at once is not going to happen. But yeah, that's all notes in the scale. As people said, it would make sense to break it up into different positions.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115