#1
I have posted this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Su0pxjyBhNE attempting some Jimi Hendrix style rhythm improv. I realise I'm not the greatest player.
Would anyone be able to provide constructive criticism on how to get a better Hendrix style sound/technique?
Last edited by cactus-dude at Dec 29, 2014,
#2
It's a pretty good start if you ask me, you're getting the basic elements of that kind of thing down pretty well.

This is a good thing to watch:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o4jbCDfSXS0

I would say one of the most important things to make sure of is to never lose the groove. I don't think you did but it's something to really watch out for.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#4
Quote by jerrykramskoy
You're on your way, there. As Zaphod says, the groove is king ... and your feel was good.

For the finer nuances, I suggest you get yourself a copy of Transcribe (http://www.seventhstring.com/xscribe/download.html) ... you can really clearly slow down what's going on. Seriously worth the money.

cheers, Jerry


Good call on Transcribe, examining Hendrix's own music and really getting to grips with what's going on will help massively.

Edit: I will note that in this case the physical nature of what's happening is important as well. Usually I tell people to ignore the physical nature of playing and say that you should concentrate on the music but in this case I think the physical process of playing the parts probably went in to their composition more than in a lot of other cases.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Dec 26, 2014,
#5
Thanks a lot guys. I'll check out your link for Transcribe Jerry and the Guthrie Govan vid was really useful.

I will note that in this case the physical nature of what's happening is important as well. Usually I tell people to ignore the physical nature of playing and say that you should concentrate on the music but in this case I think the physical process of playing the parts probably went in to their composition more than in a lot of other cases.


By this do you mean I'm concentrating too much on playing right or I need to spend more time practicing on the physical playing rather than the music?
I might try to get better at playing using Hendrix's "thumb-fretting the low E string" left-hand position with all the other fingers free to do the little embellishments. Do you think that would help or hinder?

Thanks again
#6
Quote by cactus-dude
Thanks a lot guys. I'll check out your link for Transcribe Jerry and the Guthrie Govan vid was really useful.


By this do you mean I'm concentrating too much on playing right or I need to spend more time practicing on the physical playing rather than the music?
I might try to get better at playing using Hendrix's "thumb-fretting the low E string" left-hand position with all the other fingers free to do the little embellishments. Do you think that would help or hinder?

Thanks again

I think that partly depends on hand size and shape.I have short stubby hands and find it difficult.I can hit a chord like that but then when it comes to the twiddley bits i have to cheat and move my hand position.Jimmy had long skinny hands and this kind of playing came naturally,For others like me,It's extremely difficult.It has'nt stopped me learning Jimmy's stuff though,I've just adapted.
#7
Quote by cactus-dude
By this do you mean I'm concentrating too much on playing right or I need to spend more time practicing on the physical playing rather than the music?
I might try to get better at playing using Hendrix's "thumb-fretting the low E string" left-hand position with all the other fingers free to do the little embellishments. Do you think that would help or hinder?

Thanks again


I mean that the nature of what you can play is quite dependent on the physical nature of the style. So if you want the key notes of the chord ringing out that's going to really limit what you can do with the rest of your hand to get other notes. That combination of what you can keep ringing and what you can play at the same time have a big interaction when it comes to what you can play. It's not like shredding where the main questions of playing are going to be economy of motion, relaxation, and where your picking hand needs to be for the next note and so on. Obviously with judicious choice of muting notes and what you play you can keep the impression of the chord in place, but that's going to be done through careful note choice.

If you can manage it then I would say learning to fret with your thumb like that would be very helpful; more fingers open to do the embellishments as you say.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#8
Ok thanks for the encouragement. I think I'll practice that style and see where it takes me.