#1
Hi, I'm trying to get into writing songs and I have started a collection of melodies, but my main guitar is tuned in C# tuning (C#F#BEG#C#) and I can't find any chord charts for this tuning, so I can't play anything other than power chords for rhythm.

Could you perhaps link me somewhere where I can learn how to construct basic major and minor chords, or tell me how to here? "Bing"-ing the subject has proved unfruitful.

Thanks
#2
Each of your strings is tuned down 3 semitones down from standard tuning.

So, every chord shape for standard tuning applies.

For example, in standard tuning, Em triad is

0 treble E.
0
0
2
2
0 bass E

For you, that same shape gives you C# min (Db min). If you want Em, then you have to barre at the 3rd fret.

so ...

0 + 3 treble E = 3
0 + 3 ------------- 3
0 + 3 ------------- 3
2 + 3 ------------- 5
2 + 3 ------------- 5
0 + 3 bass E--- 3


In standard tuning, A7 could be played as

5
5
6
5
7
5

For you, this shape would give Gb7 or F#7. If you want A7, barre at 3 frets higher, so

8
8
9
8
10
8

In other words, any shape you see in a normal chord book, just move each of the indicated frets up by another three frets to get the same pitches as in the book.

cheers, Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Dec 26, 2014,
#3
The chords are exactly the same, no matter what tuning you are in (as long as it's a standard like tuning). That's because the distance between the notes on the open strings stays the same. As Jerry said, the chords just get different names than in standard. The fingering of E minor chord in standard tuning is a C# minor chord in your tuning.

If you want to build chords, knowing intervals helps. Minor chord = root, minor third, perfect fifth (1, b3, 5). Major chord = root, major third, perfect fifth (1, 3, 5).

A chord gets its name from the root note and the quality of the other intervals in the chord. When we are talking about major and minor chords, the only thing that changes is the third. In minor chords the third is minor and in major chord the third is major - pretty logical, eh?


Or there's another way - take the major scale and flatten the 7th note*. This is the basic scale you use to build chords. Let's start the scale on the 3rd fret which is the E note (if we are in C# tuning). It looks like this:

|-----------------
|-----------------
|-----------------
|-----------2-3-5-
|-----2-3-5-------
|-3-5-------------

  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1

(The 8th note is the same as the 1st note, just an octave higher.)

Now, take the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes of the scale and you get a major chord. Flatten the 3rd note and you get a minor chord.

Major chord:
|-----------------
|-----------------
|-----------------
|-----------2-3-[color="Red"]5[/COLOR]-
|-----[color="Red"]2[/COLOR]-3-[color="Red"]5[/COLOR]-------
|-[color="Red"]3[/COLOR]-5-------------

  [color="Red"]1[/COLOR] 2 [color="Red"]3[/COLOR] 4 [color="Red"]5[/COLOR] 6 7 [color="Red"]1[/COLOR]


Minor chord (you need to flatten the 3rd note, ie move it one fret down to make it minor):
|-----------------
|-----------------
|-----------------
|-----------2-3-[color="Red"]5[/COLOR]-
|-----[color="Red"]1[/COLOR]-3-[color="Red"]5[/COLOR]-------
|-[color="Red"]3[/COLOR]-5-------------

  [color="Red"]1[/COLOR] 2 [color="Red"]3[/COLOR] 4 [color="Red"]5[/COLOR] 6 7 [color="Red"]1[/COLOR]

Now find more of these notes to build a chord shape. Use octave shapes to easily find the same note an octave higher/in different positions.

The chord we get is E major or E minor because you start the scale with E note. If you want a G major chord, just start the scale with the G note. (And of course if you want a minor chord, again, flatten the 3rd note.)


* The flat 7th will make more sense when you look at 7th and extended chords.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Dec 26, 2014,