#1
Hey guys

If i play lets say a open G chord, and I strum hard, the D string touches a bit the first finger. It can happen with other chords too., like C.

I can play the chords sounding smoothly strumming normally, and even a bit stronger. but if I strum like pushing the strings a ton they come back and touch something.

The question is should I keep like i am doing or make extra effort to put my fingers more "faraway" from the strings?

I think that it is acceptable that struming like mad could do that, but in the other hand aiming at better chords is what i should do.


My fingers have a kind of big "pink part of the nail" so if i put the finger perpendicular to the wood where the frets are, the nail hits first (even nail cut to the edge of pink part) so the angle is limited and it hits a limit.
#2
2nd finger on the E bass string at an angle so it mutes the A string then 3rd and 4th fingers on the B and (High) E strings. Makes a nice big sound and is easy to play hard. You can also just move the 2nd finger across to the A string and mute the D string to make a nice big C chord.

Just a simple idea to get around the problem, it's how I generally play them these days after messing around for about 20 years. You pick up little tricks as you go.
#3
Quote by Twidler
2nd finger on the E bass string at an angle so it mutes the A string then 3rd and 4th fingers on the B and (High) E strings. Makes a nice big sound and is easy to play hard. You can also just move the 2nd finger across to the A string and mute the D string to make a nice big C chord.

Just a simple idea to get around the problem, it's how I generally play them these days after messing around for about 20 years. You pick up little tricks as you go.
But, that's G5, not G major...
#4
Quote by Captaincranky
But, that's G5, not G major...


So pick up the ring finger and leave the high B string open. Boom. Two fingered G Major. Sounds huge.

But yeah, TC, with careful finger placement (which will become second nature with some practice), you should be able to play the full G chord (3-2-0-0-3-3) without either of the open strings hitting your fingers and muting out. If there's just no way you can get them to stop hitting your fingers, then you probably are just strumming too hard.
#5
Quote by yureguitar

My fingers have a kind of big "pink part of the nail" so if i put the finger perpendicular to the wood where the frets are, the nail hits first (even nail cut to the edge of pink part) so the angle is limited and it hits a limit.


I suppose I should mention, in regards to my comment that you should be able to get your fingers in place to avoid hitting the other strings... I have pretty much no fingernails on my fret hand. They're cut down well past the tip of the fingers. I can't make my nails touch the fretboard if I try.
#6
Quote by the_bi99man
I suppose I should mention, in regards to my comment that you should be able to get your fingers in place to avoid hitting the other strings... I have pretty much no fingernails on my fret hand. They're cut down well past the tip of the fingers. I can't make my nails touch the fretboard if I try.
Fingernails on your fretting hand are a huge consideration, to be sure.

But also, beginners have a tendency to not keep their fingers true at right angles to the fretboard, which tends to mute the string "below" it.

What that does, is take some of the pressure off the very tip of the fingers, which are generally hurting the noob quite a bit. It's still wrong, and you need to build up those callouses on the fingertips.

For example, incorrectly fretting the A-5 string with your fingers at less than a 90 degree angle, mutes the D-4 string "below". (The quote marks, perhaps obviously to indicate while the D-4 is "above" the A-5 in pitch, it is physically "below"it as the guitar is held)).

Correct technique is a bit awkward to be sure, and I still have to be mindful of getting lazy and slanting the fingers at less than a true right angle.

As far as the G major chord is concerned, muting the B 2nd fret, on A-5 and playing the D, 3rd fret on B-2, does give you an "acoustic power chord", a 5 string G-5. I do try to play the 3rd on A-5 2nd fret, but I also normally include that extra D note.

I only brought it up since I believe the some theory goes hand in hand with learning to play. With the process of how and why triads are formed, being a big part of basic theory.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 27, 2014,
#7
Yeah keep your finger nails cut short and make sure your finger tips are hitting the string.
When u say do a c chord hit each string frist and make sure u are not buzzing and muttering other strings then strumm it go to Justin guitar for lessons
#8
Quote by yureguitar

My fingers have a kind of big "pink part of the nail" so if i put the finger perpendicular to the wood where the frets are, the nail hits first (even nail cut to the edge of pink part) so the angle is limited and it hits a limit.



I know exactly what you mean as I have similar fingers. I just make sure to file my nails down as short as possible (file, not cut) and adjust my fingers until I get something which works. You'll need to find your own way of figuring this out.